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I have had my 380 ez for a couple of years and have had the failure to feed and stovepipe issues pretty much every other mag. I read somewhere that if you scored the mag follower it helped, so I used a dremel to crosshatch the followers on 6 mags.
went to the range today and out of 300 rounds I had 1 ftf and 1 stovepipe which to me is acceptable. Various ammo used, magtech, fiocchi hollow point, Winchester and some poly defense. The problem mag was one without the yellow paint and using the fiocchi.
when I used the same mag and ammo a couple more times no problem. I loaded the mags with 2 rounds to 8 rounds and no probs.
not saying this will work for you but it works for me. Much happier now with the EZ.
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WOW. That's a bit radical but if it works, hooray for you. My stovepipe issues are sporadic and not always with the same one or two of my 6 magazines. They are always on the last round of the magazine though, but not always toward the end of my shooting sessions. One thing about scoring the followers the way you did is that if it doesn't work properly, followers are cheap to buy. LOL
 

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I used my EZ for the first time yesterday. I had the stovepipe issue, and another couple of times the spent shells ejected straight up. Another few times after the magazine was empty the slide didn't pop open. And then throw in a bunch of misfires. The two instructors (both former Marines) were both baffled and they were both thinking that I wasn't gripping the grip safety hard enough. I'm going to definitely send the gun in and aside from the stovepipe thing has anyone heard of an issue with the grip safety? It is a gun that is supposed to be EZ, so I can't imagine that is designed to need me to be squeezing the heck out of the grip. Thanks for any help. I hadn't seen this issue discussed anywhere.
 

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Actually, you do need to squeeze the grip quite firmly, making SURE the web of your hand is as high on the back of the grip as possible. However, if the grip safety is not pushed in all the way the gun just plain won't fire, so I'm not sure at all that the grip safety has anything to do with all of those terrible feeding problems. But, even so, I've heard of people having limp wristing problems with the EZ even when the grip safety was pushed in far enough for the trigger to work.

Not sure what you mean by a misfire. Does that mean there was a dent in the primer but the round did not go BANG? AND you said the spent shells ejected straight up. I think you meant that they did not eject, but were caught in the slide, standing straight up. Right?

Did you have someone else fire you gun to see if it is the gun or you? That is a very important thing to do before sending it back. The gun is easy to use, but it is still a gun and has to be used properly in order to work properly. I'm not accusing you of anything, and I understand that you had two instructors there who were baffled. "Baffled" happens to a lot of us from time to time if someone is shooting a "different" type of gun.

The stovepipe issue, with a round not feeding into the chamber but rather it winds up standing straight up, is a known and unfortunately fairly common issue. Some guns have a big problem with that and some never have a problem at all through many hundreds of rounds.

Given all of that, you could have a problem gun. They happen - with all manufacturers - from time to time.

Personally, my .380EZ is a fun gun to shoot at the range, but no way would I count on it to save my life. Not ever.
 

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Actually, you do need to squeeze the grip quite firmly, making SURE the web of your hand is as high on the back of the grip as possible. However, if the grip safety is not pushed in all the way the gun just plain won't fire, so I'm not sure at all that the grip safety has anything to do with all of those terrible feeding problems. But, even so, I've heard of people having limp wristing problems with the EZ even when the grip safety was pushed in far enough for the trigger to work.

Not sure what you mean by a misfire. Does that mean there was a dent in the primer but the round did not go BANG? AND you said the spent shells ejected straight up. I think you meant that they did not eject, but were caught in the slide, standing straight up. Right?

Did you have someone else fire you gun to see if it is the gun or you? That is a very important thing to do before sending it back. The gun is easy to use, but it is still a gun and has to be used properly in order to work properly. I'm not accusing you of anything, and I understand that you had two instructors there who were baffled. "Baffled" happens to a lot of us from time to time if someone is shooting a "different" type of gun.

The stovepipe issue, with a round not feeding into the chamber but rather it winds up standing straight up, is a known and unfortunately fairly common issue. Some guns have a big problem with that and some never have a problem at all through many hundreds of rounds.

Given all of that, you could have a problem gun. They happen - with all manufacturers - from time to time.

Personally, my .380EZ is a fun gun to shoot at the range, but no way would I count on it to save my life. Not ever.
I'm new at this, so don't know the lingo, or much of anything else. Twice the spent shell went straight up in front of my face. My misfire I mean that nothing happened when I pulled the trigger. One instructor tried it and the slide didn't work when it was empty. The other instructor taped the grip so the safety was depressed but that wasn't 100 % either. And the entire time I was trying to grip it high up.
 

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That's OK about the lingo. Keep communicating with us here and we'll help you learn the proper terms. Actually, ejected straight up was exactly what happened!

I've had shells hit me in the face upon occasion, especially when shooting indoors when the shell ejects to the side but hits the divider between lanes and bounces back and hits me in the face or head! That is why I wear really good wrap around shooting glasses, a HIGH NECK shirt and always, always, wear a "baseball cap" when shooting to further protect my eyes.

I've done the famous "hot brass dance" already when a hot casing from the shooter next to me when outdoors bounced into the back of the neck of my tee shirt and down my back. Several women I know have small scars on their chest from hot brass that went in the front of their top and got stuck in their bra.

When you are a regular shooter and you know at least some of the other people around you, everyone laughs when you do the Hot Brass Dance because it is unmistakable! The most important thing is to NEVER lose control of your gun, and keep it pointed down range no matter what happens.

I don't mean to discourage you in any way. I've been shooting for 25 years, including a lot of serious classes, and absolutely love doing it. A lot of practice and good instructors and you'll be right up there with the "big kids!"
 

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That's OK about the lingo. Keep communicating with us here and we'll help you learn the proper terms. Actually, ejected straight up was exactly what happened!

I've had shells hit me in the face upon occasion, especially when shooting indoors when the shell ejects to the side but hits the divider between lanes and bounces back and hits me in the face or head! That is why I wear really good wrap around shooting glasses, a HIGH NECK shirt and always, always, wear a "baseball cap" when shooting to further protect my eyes.

I've done the famous "hot brass dance" already when a hot casing from the shooter next to me when outdoors bounced into the back of the neck of my tee shirt and down my back. Several women I know have small scars on their chest from hot brass that went in the front of their top and got stuck in their bra.

When you are a regular shooter and you know at least some of the other people around you, everyone laughs when you do the Hot Brass Dance because it is unmistakable! The most important thing is to NEVER lose control of your gun, and keep it pointed down range no matter what happens.

I don't mean to discourage you in any way. I've been shooting for 25 years, including a lot of serious classes, and absolutely love doing it. A lot of practice and good instructors and you'll be right up there with the "big kids!"
Thanks for the support, I appreciate it! Will reply when I get answers 👍
 
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