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Some guys have found some very small mods they can make to make it much easier to use it as a slide release. They may pop up, or you could search the board for slide release problems and probably find the answer.
 

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I've had mine for almost 3 years, don't know how many rounds through it. When I first bought it it was REALLY HARD, but many, many, many releases with a gloved thumb loosened it up quite a bit, but it is still not easy by any means but it's doable. With me being able to release it with my thumb just adds another tool to the ol toolbox of officer survival skills.

I have not tried it, but I have read of others taking a fine file to the Slide Stop lever (not the slide...) and made it easier. Speed Shooter Specialties has Slide Stop Levers in stock for $8 if you should decide to try that and screw it up.
 

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It CAN be done but its not its intention.
I CAN get my shields to drop slide IF slam in mag hard enough but I dont do it regularly as its NOT the intention.

Like every thing there are there are those who like to do it differently.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I see that a lot of you prefer the slingshot. However, I am determined to use the slide stop as a slide release. I have 1000 rounds through it and still can not release the slide with the button.
Could anyone offer detailed advice on how I can make that work?
I'm an old-school fart and to me it's a slide-release, grammar be [email protected].

As pointed out previously, nowhere in the manual does it say *not* to use it as a slide-release. Also, if it's not to be used as a slide-release, why did S&W bother to put serrations on it?

I've read elsewhere that some have used it exclusively as a slide-release w/no problems after many thousands of rds, so what's the worry?

As stiff as it is, I can see why S&W only mentions 'slide-stop' lest someone complain that their slide-release 'is too stiff', 'is defective', etc.

I currently own four 9mm Shields. I used an emery board ('no, honey, I don't know where your emery board is' ;)) to lightly polish the contact area on the slide-release where it contacts the slide.

Three of the four Shields now have a functional (albeit still stiff) slide-release. The fourth is the newest w/the fewest rds through it (I'll let it wear-in over time rather than risk removing too much material from the slide-release).

Use it as a slide-stop or slide-release, whichever you prefer, IMHO.

Tomac
 

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I believe it was S&W`s intention, to make them very stiff,
to keep the slide from accidentally releasing when installing the mag home.

My shields have loosened up enough to release the slide now, but i still slingshot them into battery. I`ve never used the slide lever on any of my semi-auto guns to release the slide into battery, i only use the lever to lock them open. I have many 1911`s that will slam home when the mag is bumped in. So the lever is worthless at that point.

Yeah yeahhhh, everybody`s come back is, "but what if i only have one hand to use"
Well if thats the case, buy a revolver...! The stiff slide lever issue has been beat to death.

Has anybody ever found/seen any statistics on stiff slide locks in combat..? Yeah me neither.

I personally think that too many people watch too many hollywood movies.
I find that people just like the sound and sight of it when they use the lever to release the slide... the COOLNESS factor.
 

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The next time a 'self appointed expert' tells you that its safer to release the slide by ignoring the specific instructions that come with your pistol, turn around and walk out, he doesn't know what he's talking about. What he told you is his opinion, but its not always the correct way to do it.
This topic is often discussed and deserves a logical discussion each time.

So, IF the firearm in question is not manufactured by S&W and they read their other manufacturers' Owner Manual that labels the part differently I guess they should ignore that advice as well.

It is nonsense to consider whether safety is a issue regarding the manner in which the slide is allowed to move into battery; muzzle direction is the primary safety on any firearm, not any lever on the side of the slide. Allowing a new firearm owner to have in their belief system that the manner in which a slide lever is manipulated to perform a task is somehow related to firearm safety is a serious mistake.

Muzzle Safety

Why are traffic "stop" lights not called "go" lights ?; both seem to be a very important function for same device. I guess they designed it to be "stop" light but the "go" light is a defect they can't engineer out of it.

Do these parts "stop" a slide or "release" a slide ? How can you tell by just looking at them ?



Having an ambidextrous slide release could be handy (pun-intended).

When one-handed shooting requires reloading, will activating a slide stop lever allow the slide to move into battery ?

Why is it necessary for the M&P slide stop lever to be ambidextrous ? 1911's usually have single slide stop levers and their slides still "stop".


Often times firearm parts are labeled for their function; apparently all these manufacturers safety engineers don't understand the proper design of a slide lever; some of these firearms even have a "release lever" on both sides ! Yikes, one can only imagine what that owner manual instructs the user to do.






Once you use the lever to "stop" a slide, what does the lever do to the slide to get it "going" again. How does it know ?


How come a magazine follower isn't called a slide stop ?


How come slide release levers are available in different sizes ? Imagine how dangerous an "extended slide release" lever must be !





The Glock nomenclature is schizophrenic, their engineers want it both ways......slide "stop release".



IF the S&W designers shaped the slide "stop" lever based on intentions, then they designed it upside down, as the fullness on top of the engagement areas favors ease of downward movement ! If their intentions were truly to only have the lever only moved upwards then you would think the bulge would be on the lower aspect of the engagement.



Finally, upwards of 70% of law enforcement / military sidearm use encounters that have been closely studied reveal that the operator is using his "handgun" one-handed as designed; that means they better understand how to manage reloading and clearing malfunctions one-handed; none of the accepted methods include the operator grabbing the rear of the slide one handed and sling-shotting the slide into battery.
One-Hand Reloading

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.
 

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To each their own, use the lever any way that suits your wants & needs.
Is there a right or wrong way of operating your gun...? Run it however you want.
This debate will continue long after we`re all gone....lol
 

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I see that a lot of you prefer the slingshot. However, I am determined to use the slide stop as a slide release. I have 1000 rounds through it and still can not release the slide with the button.
Could anyone offer detailed advice on how I can make that work?
I've ruined more than a few things with my ham-handed attempts to "improve" them, so take this with a grain of salt.

My Shield arrived with a slide ####### that required two thumbs to drop the slide which offended my sense of propriety. I checked the slide stop and the notch in the slide and couldn't see any burrs or anything that would obviously impede the proper (as countenanced by GAWD and John Browning) release of the slide. Dragging my fingernail across the surfaces, it became apparent that the surfaces were slightly rough.

I figured a little polishing was in order, so I took a popsicle stick and rubbed some Flitz metal polish into its narrow edge and manually raised the slide stop and sawed away on its bearing surface until it was bright and shiny.

Boom, the slide stop is now a slide release.

If you've got burrs, you'll probably have to go the sandpaper/stone route, but the chances that you'll screw up the engagement angles, making the hold open function not work anymore, increase so...
 

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To each their own, but i prefer to slingshot and never use the slide stop as a slide release. If i did use the slide stop as a release, that would mean that my hand would have to change position from a positive grip of the gun to release the slide using the lever.
 

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The slingshot method is a well-established method to reliably return the slide to battery; lots of slide real estate for the support hand to grasp.

However the method has one short coming for those who choose to simply "come over the top" to manipulate the slide, the back of their hand prevents the operator from viewing the breech; the old adage, whether pistol or carbine, "watch it load, know its loaded". Just rotating the strong hand 45 degrees will allow the breech to in full view to observe the round being properly chambered as the slide is sling shotted; not important on the range but is critical if you will be stepping out from behind cover to engage a down range threat. The same is true for carbine reloads, make a habit of rotating the rifle so you can watch the round chamber as you depress the bolt catch.

The subconscious mind knows correct repetition.

Caution: Pseudo-science may be embedded in this post.
 

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mp9, whatever works for you, go with it. I really dont want to argue the point of theories with you. But please let me say... if you`re "watchin it load", your not watchin the bad guy.
If i have to watch my gun load, that means i dont trust my weapon to do what its supposed to do. A good weapon should never need a set of eyes watching it.

And let me add... my gun is ready long before i would EVER step out in front of the bad guy... just sayin
 

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We are still discussing slide manipulation, just no levers involved.

Some may be interested in learning about subtle differences regarding the manner that their pistol support hand can grasp the slide to perform an immediate reload:

1. using an “over-the-top” grip on the rear of the slide, the user grasps the slide between the four fingers and their palm, such a grip blocks the view of the breech. It’s also awkward if a pistol optic is mounted.

2. pinching the rear of the slide between the support thumb and index finger combined with a slight cant by the strong hand causes the support hand to get out of the line of sight to breech, affording an unobstructed view of the breech loading to the operator.

One method is not quicker than the other, one just affords the operator a higher degree of certainty that the top round in the magazine is not crooked from the impact of being loaded etc., as well as the chamber was indeed loaded.


Some may find the following video demonstrations of interest.

Reload Time

At 1:19 & 1:41 the orientation of the hands and slide is shown with momentary glance of the eyes to the breech.
Immediate Reload



Regardless of method chosen if cover is available and its being properly used there is no view of the down range threat during a reload; this highlights the importance of having the gun properly loaded and in a firearm presentation with sights aligned Before stepping out from behind cover. This practical application of this Principle is well demonstrated during this One-Hand Reload.


Amateurs practice to do it correctly, professionals practice to never get it wrong.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur graphics may be embedded in this post.
 

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We are still discussing slide manipulation, just no levers involved.

Some may be interested in learning about subtle differences regarding the manner that their pistol support hand can grasp the slide to perform an immediate reload:

1. using an “over-the-top” grip on the rear of the slide, the user grasps the slide between the four fingers and their palm, such a grip blocks the view of the breech. It’s also awkward if a pistol optic is mounted.

2. pinching the rear of the slide between the support thumb and index finger combined with a slight cant by the strong hand causes the support hand to get out of the line of sight to breech, affording an unobstructed view of the breech loading to the operator.

One method is not quicker than the other, one just affords the operator a higher degree of certainty that the top round in the magazine is not crooked from the impact of being loaded etc., as well as the chamber was indeed loaded.


Some may find the following video demonstrations of interest.

Reload Time

At 1:19 & 1:41 the orientation of the hands and slide is shown with momentary glance of the eyes to the breech.
Immediate Reload



Regardless of method chosen if cover is available and its being properly used there is no view of the down range threat during a reload; this highlights the importance of having the gun properly loaded and in a firearm presentation with sights aligned Before stepping out from behind cover. This practical application of this Principle is well demonstrated during this One-Hand Reload.


Amateurs practice to do it correctly, professionals practice to never get it wrong.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur graphics may be embedded in this post.
mp9werks, YOU sir, are a human encyclopedia...lol ;)
I dont see how you can make a "crooked magazine" work properly, they only go in one way... but anyhow... carry on...lol
 

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The magazine is never crooked, as you say, it can only be introduced straight guided by the sidewalls of the magwell.

During the reloading process of semi-autos, hand and fore-finger orientation on the magazine to be inserted is the First Step of making sure the bullet nose is properly oriented and properly held by the magazine lips.

The devil is the spring-loaded top round in the magazine being precariously held by just the magazine lips that can be slightly dislodged by the act of magazine insertion, making even the most accommodating feed ramp / bullet nose design suddenly the operators worst friend. When the round is not perfectly secured by the magazine lips, once the slide is released (levers or slingshot) the slide pawl will drive between the lips and either push the round into the chamber or totally push the round obliquely and thus the round jamming between the breech face and some where off center of the feed ramp. Visually checking the top round AFTER the magazine has been inserted is the important Second Step.

A civilian and even most law enforcement personnel will never be required to perform an immediate reload at the speed of human reaction time; however, those that may will find these nuances of technique to serve them well in time of need.
 

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PaPow I use the slingshot method also because it simplifies movements that I need to employ to clear jams etc'. Yes it's slower and I accept that, but it's surer when considering everything. One makes the choice for oneself. When under stress gross movements work best. That's not even up for debate, it's been proven time after time in countless scenarios. I was trained that way in the military and that training sticks.

In the M&P it's a slide stop and not a release. Trying to confuse the issue by introducing designs having a slide release has no bearing on the M&P. They are other designs (I love the 1911). When I used a 1911 I used the over the top to clear jams and the slide release as appropriate, but the over the top slingshot method would have worked for both and I was in the process of converting over to over the top slingshot for everything for the 1911. I surprised a trainer by doing that and getting the 1911 back into action incredibly rapidly. He didn't say anything but i knew he registered surprise; I saw it.

With the M&P 9C if I need more than 12 rounds I'm in some really deep doo-doo and by then I've found cover if I'm being me. I might even be digging out my carbine (or the bear spray) and unfolding it to put it into action. I'd be one sorry Sad Sack if I ever found myself away from cover if I knew something was coming down... there is no substitute for situational awareness. I could never be that involved in anything to be unaware of what's going on around me to find myself in that situation. It just can't happen, maybe if I have alzheimers, but that's not in the foreseeable future.
 

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During a reload, I normally come across the top of the slide to retract it and chamber a round. That being said, I also practice using the slide lock lever to release the slide, but NOT with my shooting hand, but rather, with my support hand, so that I don't need to adjust my grip.

My support hand inserts the fresh mag, comes up into the grip support position and the thumb of my support hand presses the lever, releasing the slide. I can do this quicker than sling-shotting the slide and as mentioned above, no repositioning of my shooting hand is required. I've shown this method to my friends that prefer using a 'slide release' rather than slingshot and they have all adopted the 'support thumb release' technique on all their pistols.

As a side note... I bought my Shield in May of 2012 when they 1st came out. It has well over 15K rounds through it, with no appreciable wear to the Slide/Slide Lock components.
 

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Just picked up a Walther PPQ M2 on the recommendation of Bill Rogers. Interestingly, as a German subsidiary of Smith & Wesson, Walther labels the parts similarly but has a first recommendation for employing the slide stop lever "to release the slide." Those Germans are always trying to teach us something.

It's also remarkably similar to M&P9 M2, the HK VP9 and P30 - laying side by side on the table they are patent-friendly clones of one another.
The uniqueness is the single-action striker mechanism of the PPQ compared to the Glock / M&P's double-action mechanism.

 
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