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Discussion Starter #1
I live in a small town in the midwest, and recently the cheif of police retired. So the city PD hired the their part-timer as a full timer, and now they need a part-timer to fill in for vacations, illness, etc. it's a real small town off of the beaten path, pop. is around 1700 people. They have 4 full time officers including the new cheif.



I am on real good terms with 3 of the officers, and we go and shoot together on the range. Anyway they came to me and asked if I wanted to be the reserve officer for the town. When I was younger I had always wanted to be an officer, but it never seemed to be the right time. I am now in my late 30's, a business owner, and I really like the community I live in, so I do alot to do my part to make it a nice little town. I have been thinking long and hard about it, and have only a few reservations.



Number one is my business, I spend a lot of time on it as I am not only the owner, but sole employee. It takes a lot of time and effort to keep it going and build business. So I am not so sure I would be available enough to be able to help out. My second reservation is I would not be a "real" officer, but a reserve officer. From what I have read that means I have the same duties as the full timers, but I cant do a few things without calling for help, ie OWI's and that kind of thing. I would have a year to take some basic classes, and would not have to go through an academy. Even though it is a small town, I would still want to be able to do all that I could in the position, and it seems that the training would be next to none. Ride a few times with an officer, take a few classes, and then work shifts as needed. Maybe I am over thinking things, but this seems to me to be abit light on training cosidering the reponsibilites entailed. The positive is I would be able to do something I have always wanted to experience, and I would have the opportunity to help out the town as well.



Any other pitfalls, things I might have not mentioned, or opinions from some of the LEO's on this board?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My appologies, I thought they had taken care of Detroit with some nukes a few years back.




Seriously though I've been there, thats one city I would not want to live in, much less patrol. Every city has its "bad" side, but Detroit seemed to be nothing but bad followed by worse, and very cold looking.
 

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I think you should give it a try. It doesn't have to be a long term committment. Plus, you said that it is something you always wanted to do. The one downside I see is the lack of formal training.
 

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As long as you are competent with a firearm and "know" when to use deadly force, try it. When would you get a better chance at trying on the badge. If you don't like it you are not out much. If you do like, who knows where it may lead to!! What's the worst case? Have a little fun with it.
 

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I have been in LE for around 37 years, In Mi. and Az. currently I'm working in the Jail. I am a Sheriff Deputy. When I was a kid I always wanted to be a cop, just like my Dad was. Well as you can see I'm still working and love it. Do what you have to do. I would also check with your local, Pros Office to see what training is needed in Iowa. Then go with your feelings. One thing I can say for sure, things have sure changed since 1970 when I first started. It really was alot more fun back then.



rogero
 

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I'm not a LEO, but here is different thought

I would be the first to tell you to do what you truly want to do. Sounds like a good strategy to me.



But, I never had the guts to do that and somehow fate took much better care of me than any good plan I ever came up with. Until I was in my 40's -with kids in school (two in college, one in 1st grade), I worked for "the man". Good job, but it went away. Only because I could not replace it, I went into a service business. Worked hard, gave great service and at times, found it promising. Other times, and there were many, many of those times, it was so bleak that I wanted to give up. Probably would have but I had no place else to go. Stuck it out, worked harder and in time, one truck became two trucks, then three trucks..... now up to 25 trucks. I don't work anymore, that kid in the first grade when I started has been out of college five years and runs the business. It is great for me and great for him. He's doing a better job than I did.



If there is anything to be learned from this, is that you don't have to be smart or have a great plan to make things work. If you stay in business, pay attention to detail, take care of your customers and you will stand out from those who do not. And, don't give up your dream. Good luck!
 

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All of the responsibility with few of the benefits, huh? What's not to like? What happens when you get hurt as a reserve officer and are unable to work your real job? There's a lot more to policing than being a shooter. That's a good start, but that's the least of the job. You clearly have some misgivings. Proceed with caution and good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thats exactly the kind of thinking I was looking for, very valid pioint, what happens if I get hurt on the job.



Thanks for your input 8)
 

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Angry_American said:
Thats exactly the kind of thinking I was looking for, very valid pioint, what happens if I get hurt on the job.



Thanks for your input 8)


Our reserves are covered under workmans comp for LOD injuries. Maybe your department is the same?

Starting out as a reserve is a great way to get your feet wet and see if you might like the job. It is also a great way to serve your community.
 

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If you get hurt and the dept provides you workers comp, can you still keepyour buisness running, and how much money will they pay you, is it enough for you to continue your lifestyle.

If you like the answers to those questions and can get more traing as time passes, why not try it.

If youlike it you can keep it up, if you dont you can quit with the knowledge that you tried it.

But the injury issue is something that definately needs to be looked at before you find yourself in a jackpot. Hopefully you will never need it but.. you should know how your going to take care of yourself/family
 

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THINGS TO CONSIDER

First off, you have to step back and consider some of these points. They're not all inclusive, but will give you an idea of what you're looking at...



TRAINING... How long is the training. In PA, for a muninicipal officer, you're looking at twelve weeks of continuous training, or if you don't want to do it all at once, you can take time away from your family, every weekend, for a year. The twelve week schedule is eight hours and day, five days a week. Can you afford that amount of time?



WORK... are you willing to work nights, weekends and holidays? As a reserve officer, you'll be working the shifts no one else wants, working for the regular officers on the holidays, or working what we in the federal service call "sick and dick"... whoever gets sick you get dicked. And if married, what's the Little Lady think of this whole idea, especially knowing you'll more than likely, be working nights and weekends.



LIABILITY/COMPENSATION... do you have the same liability and compensation coverage as the regular officers. Insurance????



There are a host and multitude of things to consider in a decision as such and each must be researched and weighed before you make this decision.



Good luck in whatever you decide, and if you go for it, you'll find it can be one of the craziest, zaniest and at times scary jobs you'll love to work.
 

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I think the most important qualities for a LEO are the ability to communicate with people and just

having some "life experience". When I was working in Florida my agency would at times hire 19

year olds ( the minimum age for a LEO on FL ) and they would almost always fail miserably at

police work. How are they going to deal with domestics when they don't understand the pressures

of being married??? I also observed that they were a lot quicker to go "hands on" in situations

where maybe some more dialogue would have gotten the desired result.



It sounds like you have some life experience. Law Enforcement is a career that can be very

gratifying and very sad. I often tell people it is the best and worse job I have ever had. I bet

more than a few of the LEO's here would agree.



I say if you want to do it, give it a shot. I would definitely get some training in Constitutional

Law, Use of Force, and your state laws / ordinances. The job is 90% common sense. If you

have that, a level head under stress, and a desire to serve, Go for it!!! Good luck!!!
 
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