MP-Pistol Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey all, looking for some pointers. I'm shooting a M&P Shield 9mm (1.0) and I love it. My issue is, I really don't know what I'm doing wrong when it comes to shooting. I align my sights right at the bullseye, and pull the trigger and bang - I'm down under the sight, or down and left. I've attempted to change where I place my finger on the trigger, I've tried squeezing the trigger faster/slower, and I really don't know why it's just going off.
I'm not sure if my elbows are supposed to be locked out or not - I typically lock out my dominant arm and my support arm is slightly bent. Also, my hands are huge, so it's difficult to get a good solid grip with my support hand. I don't know if this may be the reason?
I've seen videos about focusing on the front sight vs focusing on the target.. what do y'all think? I'll gladly apply any pointers. Thanks in advance!
17555
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
263 Posts
17557

Practice slow dry fire and watch your sights as you pull the trigger. You are most likely moving when the trigger breaks.
When live firing, start out close to your target until you start getting the groups you like, then increase your distance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Little Shield can be difficult took me awhile to quit hitting low left , I used a Pachmayr Tactical grip and made sure wrist was straight. Keep shooting it will come to you , I now handle Shield better than M&P9
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
I would confirm that you are not squeezing your entire hand as you are squeezing the trigger.

Move the trigger straight to the rear in a smooth motion, once you start the movement keep it going until the gun fires.

Don't "make the gun go off", just keep moving the trigger until it does.

In target shoot you always concentrate on the front sight only. Everything else goes blurry. The alignment of the sights is the most important part of accuracy. When the sights are perfectly aligned you have a significant amount of movement allowable to still get an accurate shot.

These are not target guns, so know that you won't get target-gun results.

Try different ammo. "Range ammo" is usually FMJs, but defense ammo is not. You want something like Federal HSTs or Speer Gold Dots for defense. There are different bullet weights in each caliber, so you need to test. Buy range ammo of the same weight to keep the groups and recoil as similar as possible.

Once you have a defense round you like you will need to shoot at least 100 rounds of it at the range without a malfunction in order to call it good for use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Apply more grip pressure with your left hand, approximately 60-70% compared to right hand, assuming you're right handed.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
83 Posts
I am new like you and watched MANY videos on grip, trigger pull and stance. Stance may be personal though. I did ask and got help from the Range Safey Officer where I shoot. He shoots competitively and was very helpful. Been dry firing too, as suggested. Bought a G-Sight laser cartridge and G-Sight app too register hits on a target I tape to the wall. I usually have a good, fairly close group. But, still low and left a lot. I think it is mostly trigger pull and anticipating the shot. I don’t hit low and left when dry firing. Usually close to center. So, maybe it is more anticipation. Of course there is no recoil on dry firing. But, every video stresses lots of practice. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
613 Posts
Flinch (anticipation)

This can be easily checked by simply using a bench to keep the handgun supported during the firing sequence. I would bet my bottom dollar that your rounds hit precisely where aimed.

As noted by other, dry firing at home can help you overcome most of the anticipation flinch by training your brain and finger in the absence of a kaboom.
 
  • Like
Reactions: jkv45
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top