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Discussion Starter #1
Whenever I take my M&P .40 to the local indoor range I end up pissing off people to my right. The M&P throws brass in a perfect arc over the barrier and onto the poor person in the next bay.



Now, in all honesty, I think getting hit with brass is just a reality in shooting that one should learn to live with, but my fear is a safety issue... the line is open to beginning shooters as well as experienced. My fear is that people, when hit with hot brass AND they have a gun in hand, they can do dangerous things... like wave it all around.



I think my concerns can be taken care of by just asking the range personnel for the far right lane, so my only neighbors are to my left...



I guess my main reason for this post is to find out if anyone else has had this issue with their M&P?



When I take my SW1911 to the range, I am usually pissing people off about 4 lanes down... strong extractor!

:twisted:
 

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You could try to get an end stall, whenever possible. The brass coming over can be annoying. It is one of the downsides to useing public ranges. On the up side if all your brass is in the next stall when your done shooting you can ask the people there to pick it up for you :wink:
 

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IMHO that is part of going to the range. If people are getting irritated that is their problem.
 

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I've been stuck in a stall to the right of a Glock owner at least twice. It's difficult to concentrate when hot brass is hitting you in the head and dropping past your sights. After those incidences, I tried to get an end stall where no one would be, and I made every effort to avoid launching brass over the wall at anyone else. To that effect, I worked up some loads that don't have the energy to fly in that particular way, but more to the side so it bounces off the wall and then back behind me. There's a product out there that is basicly just a net that can be installed betwen the stall top and the ceiling that prevents brass from going over. It's expensive though, an it'd certainly be cheaper to rig something.



Oh, to the OP's question if I've had this problem of up and over with my gun: No, Not really. MOst of my cases shoot out to the side, pelting everyone on an open line, but in stalls they just bounce behind me. It seems to be ammo specific, which jives with my different loads. Try a different ammo and see if the angle changes.
 

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Every Tuesday night My wife, her uncle & mom, my dad and I go to a "league shoot" where we go through drills of timed shooting. It's a very fun atmosphere and the only competition is yourself and your previous score. I'm always hitting people with my brass as it flies right over to my neighbor. I haven't seen it irritate anyone though. It's usually just laughed about after the session!



If you think about it, though, we're all at the range to get better at shooting, for the reason that some day we might need to use it. If we're training with no distractions, would that really prepare us for real-life experiences? I don't think so!



But if you're irritating someone, that's another story. I'd move to the right, as mentioned before.
 

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I have only shot indoors a few times so don't know what is typical in terms of lane control. I would think, should your brass be hitting your neighbor, you might ask if they want to change positions. Range management shouldn't have a problem with that. IMHO



:twisted:
 

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My M&P9 doesn't do it... but I have been the "victim" a few times. I just stop what I'm doing and wait a few seconds for them to finish what they have loaded up and then continue. It isn't that big of a deal but I see your concern with a new person on the range.
 

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Ive seen a brass catcher somewhere on this board, a quick search should yield results. Not sure if your left handed though, looks like only righty's would be somewhat comfortable.
 

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The last time I was at a range, I was firing a Springfield M1903, and a man to my left was firing an M1 Garand. Every other shot of his seemed to throw brass at me or very close to me. I actually enjoyed it somewhat, it gave me a small feeling of what live combat might have felt like on a front line in WWII.
 

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+1 and an amen! The more distractions (within saftey reasons) the better! Have a friend load your mags with some random snap caps and you'll learn a whole lot more!



As far as the brass catcher, it seems a simple enough device to create ourselves; one could get some good wire and work it so it snaps onto the accsessory rail (make sure the clamp's tension is high and wrap with friction tape so it doesn't fly into one's face with the recoil!), add an impact-friendly collector (foam-lined plastic walls or netting) and voila! If I ever get some free time I'd love to get to the drafting table to at least get some sketches churned out!



BTW, notice that I'm not telling you to do this. :wink:
 

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While it is part of the indoor experience some who are not in to it as much as we are might get upset by it. I just look to see where the bullet case is going over the stall wall and change my position so the case hits the wall rather then going over it. If I have to adjust so much that it throws off my shooting I go back to normal stance and not worry about it.
 

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I will respectfully disagree with the growing groundswell of support for bombarding your neighbor with brass.



Not everyone at the range is working on their fighting mindset. Some people might, just might, be working on their marksmanship skills. Maybe they're teaching a new shooter who is already intimidated by the noise. Getting rained on by pieces of hot brass isn't going to make those tasks easier.



Then, as the OP pointed out, there are safety issues. I've seen what happens when a new shooter wearing a halter top gets a piece of very hot brass down her front and inside a bra cup ... muzzle awareness is not a consideration at that point.



Distractions are useful for certain things. I've trained with fog machines, flashbangs, police lights and sirens, Simunition rounds flying at me from every direction, etc. But that isn't an environment conducive to learning mechanical skills. You should be able to handle distractions in a fight, but that doesn't mean distractions will make you a better shooter. A balance needs to be reached.



To the OP: dude, it's just not your fault. The gun does what it does. If it annoys people, try to arrange things so it doesn't happen as much. Offer to trade lanes. Move to the far right when you can.



The indoor range where I shoot has full floor-to-ceiling barriers between lanes, so the only time someone's brass hits me is when he's pushed his muzzle out past the safe point. But getting hit by brass is part of being at a range with other people. I had a scar on my face for about six months because a piece of 5.56mm brass got stuck between my cheek and my eye protection a couple years ago. My shooting partner and I were in a class performing a team tactics drill and his spent brass hit me right as his gun ran empty. I had to continue engaging the threats until he was back up and running, so the brass just had to lie there sizzling away for about three or four seconds. Good times ...
 

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Discussion Starter #15
ToddG said:
I had a scar on my face for about six months because a piece of 5.56mm brass got stuck between my cheek and my eye protection a couple years ago. My shooting partner and I were in a class performing a team tactics drill and his spent brass hit me right as his gun ran empty. I had to continue engaging the threats until he was back up and running, so the brass just had to lie there sizzling away for about three or four seconds. Good times ...


LOL, I can sympathize... I had a very similar scar on my forehead when I was in the service. I was A-gunning for the M60 on a practice range. The gun jammed - I rolled over the back of the gunner to fix the jam on the right side of the gun. I tipped my helmet up to see things better... cleared the jam and tapped the gunner on the head. Before I could start my roll back over him, he began firing, allowing one piece of 7.62 brass to become lodged between my internal helmet strap and my forehead. I was now in the process of my roll and as I did that, our helmets bumped and forced mine down tighter on my head, REALLY trapping that brass. ***SIZZLE***
 

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I'm tall, and in most indoor ranges, most centerfire guns bounce brass off the ceiling energetically for me. About the only thing you cna do is shoot to the right of people or leave a port in between. if things are busy enough, that isn't going to happen, and it's just part of shooting indoors.



If taking new shooters, it's best to try and do it when things aren't too busy anyway, just because of the noise and new shooter nerves.
 

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This has happened to me b4 it didnt bother me at all catching brass at a range should be classified as part of the trip. If someone is to my right I will make some small talk with him and warn him in advance about the possibility..
 

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As far as I'm concerned...that's just par for the course. However, you may be able to make some adjustments to minimize the likelihood of your brass raining down on other shooters. A buddy of mine is quite tall and has very long arms. When he is shooting from the very forward-most point in the lane, his brass hits everyone to his right, but if he steps back a foot, his brass hits the divider. He's not as far forward in the lane but is still safely in his lane, if that makes any sense. Its the least he can do IMO, but its still par for the course.
 

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tamworth said:
+1 and an amen! The more distractions (within saftey reasons) the better! Have a friend load your mags with some random snap caps and you'll learn a whole lot more!



As far as the brass catcher, it seems a simple enough device to create ourselves; one could get some good wire and work it so it snaps onto the accsessory rail (make sure the clamp's tension is high and wrap with friction tape so it doesn't fly into one's face with the recoil!), add an impact-friendly collector (foam-lined plastic walls or netting) and voila! If I ever get some free time I'd love to get to the drafting table to at least get some sketches churned out!



BTW, notice that I'm not telling you to do this. :wink:


Here it is: http://mp-pistol.com/boards/viewtopic.php?...&highlight=
 
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