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Discussion Starter #1
Saw my first competition this weekend and now I want to get in the mix! I've got a M&P9C so the barrel length would probably put me at a disadvantage, but I'm still toying around with it and buck the trend. Anybody out there compete and if so, with what?
 

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If you are going to carry the 9c it would be good to shoot some IDPA matches with it I shot my first IDPA last week with my full size 40 and its a blast.
Jump right in to see where you are , then go from there . Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter #3
tigs40cal said:
If you are going to carry the 9c it would be good to shoot some IDPA matches with it I shot my first IDPA last week with my full size 40 and its a blast.
Jump right in to see where you are , then go from there . Good luck


Thanks. I've got to practice quite a bit first and buy some mag holders etc. Right now, I'm having trouble hitting 6" plates consistently from 20 yrds away, with no time limit. The competition I watched had shooters hitting rectangles of about 20" x 20" from 10-15 yrds away and 6" plates from 10 yrds away or so. After trying to hit the 6" plates at 20 yrds away, I tended to think hitting them at 10 would be easy. I've never done it under pressure though...
 

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Yeah, distances aren't usually much past 10-15 yards. I participated in a match on saturday, posted a video in another thread here
 

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Get your basics down (Safe gun handling/manipulation then basic marksmanship) and then give IDPA a shot. You'll meet great folks and really enjoy it. The 9c will make a fine gun for anyone starting out.



-B
 

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I've been shooting my M&P 9mm for almost 6 months and have been doing well with it. The pistol has been utterly reliaible with every thing I have feed through it. I have performed the trigger job from the instructions on Burwells sight and installed a warren rear and hi viz front.

I have really come to like mine alot.
 

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I've been shooting my M&P40 in USPSA for about a year now. (been competing in uspsa for 4 and change). Also shoot some steel now and then.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
kcevans said:
I've been shooting my M&P 9mm for almost 6 months and have been doing well with it. The pistol has been utterly reliaible with every thing I have feed through it. I have performed the trigger job from the instructions on Burwells sight and installed a warren rear and hi viz front.

I have really come to like mine alot.


I'm assuming you like the Hi-viz front sight? I've been thinking about adding sights to my 9C but don't want to pay and arm and a leg.
 

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IDPA and USPSA here! Both are great but I would start with IDPA first. 3 mags, a double mag pouch of some kind, safe gun handling, and a desire to have fun!! just go and do it, the guys will help you through!!
 

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I shoot IDPA pretty regularly. For the most part I shoot my full-size M&P9. I know IDPA is not training, but it is great practice and a great way to learn to shoot fast and accurately. I carry a M&P40 on-duty and a M&P9c off-duty. The M&P9 I use in IDPA has the same sight picture, trigger, and feel as my carry guns, but ammo is cheaper.



The M&P series pistols are great for IDPA and they are really starting to take off there. I think I am going to shoot my 9c at the next match just to get more trigger time with it.
 

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I really like the Hi Viz sight alot. I use it on my competition pistol, I use a factory front night sight on my M&Pc 9mm for carry.

Good luck witht the sight choise.
 

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I LOVE competition shooting, it can be incredibly self-rewarding relaxing and satisfying and terribly demanding and frustrating....



but action shooting (IPSC, IDPA etc) and precision shooting (Bullseye, smallbore, highpower, olympic) require a significantly different mindset and seem to attract a different crowd and the ideal gun for one event is not real good for the other.



the MP/Glock/tupperware type guns are great for IPSC



NRA bullseye is precision .22's and 1911 .45s with the occasional very rare .38. Olympic/international is all precision european made .22/.177/.32 (imagine a single shot .22 with a 15" barrel, or spending $2500 on an air gun)



only the 1911 seems to cross over and appear (configured differently) in both NRA and action pistol events.



AR-15's OWN high power out to 600 yds and a german company named Anschutz makes everything used in smallbore rifle competition.



Go watch different events, rifle, pistol, precision, action, shotgun.., the motto on my website is "10 meters to 1000 yards" (http://arizona.rifleshooting.com/) there are about 100 different types of shooting competition and they differ from each other as much as the ball sports such as Golf or Tennis differ from each other.



See what you like, see what the folks are using and start shooting!!!!!



Poole
 

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I was shooting in a monthly GSSF indoor league until I sold my G17 and bought my M&P9. Once I get a little trigger time with it I'll start shooing IPSC or IDPA. My local indoor range hosts weekly IPSC and monthly IDPA matches. I just need to decide if I'm going to shoot one or both of them. Do they both require off hand shooting? I'm very right handed and am not sure if I could hot the side of the building with just my left.
 

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Adam5 said:
I was shooting in a monthly GSSF indoor league until I sold my G17 and bought my M&P9. Once I get a little trigger time with it I'll start shooing IPSC or IDPA. My local indoor range hosts weekly IPSC and monthly IDPA matches. I just need to decide if I'm going to shoot one or both of them. Do they both require off hand shooting? I'm very right handed and am not sure if I could hot the side of the building with just my left.




You may have to shoot off hand, it depends on the stage. Either way, it gives you reason to learn to shoot with your left
 

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I saw my first IDPA meet this last weekend. I didn't shoot in it but observed and had a lot of fun. I need to learn more about drawing and shooting while moving, etc. before I will feel safe to compete but I plan to work towards that goal. (I will use my MP9c)
 

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The M&P is a great IDPA gun. Even IPSC (USPSA) has several classifications that the pistol would do well in.



You do NOT have to be all that good, just be safe. Speed and accuracy come with practice. There are so many gun divisions and shooter classifications that you'll always have some competitive competition, but will not be totally out classed.



I've never seen a match where people are not willing to offer all the help you would ever want. In fact, at times I've seen shooters being far too helpful and really overloading a new shooter. But I don't think the shooter minded if the grin on his face is a good gauge.



When my family travels, or I travel for business, I always pack along my pistol because there is always something going on. I can only remember one trip where I could not find any local action.



Heck, I even shot a match in Florida on Easter Sunday and had plenty of other shooters.



Get a holster (a cheap $20 Kydex is really all you need), two mag pouches and throw on an old jacket and you are ready to go.



Just don't go beyond your ability. Nobody will care if you are a slow shooter or need to tighten up your groups - we've all been beginners at one point. However, be an unsafe shooter and you'll face a very different tolerance level.



Find a match in your area. Sign up if they require pre-registration (many IDPA programs are becoming so popular that they have to limit the number of shooters). Show up early your first time so that you can get a little one-on-one. Keep your gear in its case until you know where the "Safe Area" is and what the proper procedures are for that club. Then just stay alert, listen, ask questions, and find a more experienced shooter to tag along with.



Focus on making good hits. Don't worry about the clock, the mag you dropped, or anything else. Sure, you'll make procedural errors, but that is how we learn.



DO NOT go downloading the rule book before your first outing. I've found that this generally just confuses the hell out of new shooters as much in the rules really doesn't apply to new shooters. After the first match, then you can read the book, but don't get all hung up on the details. Let your experience guide you.



Be ready for when your name comes up. Don't try to be pasting targets or picking up brass after the shooter before you. Use that time to relax and focus. Let the Safety Officer who is going to run you through the stage know that this is your first match. This not only lets them know to be extra cautious on safety issues, but also will likely get you a lot more help during the course of fire. For example, I always go over the course of fire with new shooters just to be sure they get the requirements. I'll usually remind about reloads or overlooked targets. I don't think I've ever called a penalty on a new shooter, but rather just have them correct the error.



Remember, there is ALWAYS a better shooter out there. If winning is your only objective, you'll miss out on a lot of the fun. In the beginning, the challenge is to better yourself. This is one reason that I really like the IDPA. In many shooting sports, the 'winners' get expensive prizes and the competition and level of bad sportsmanship can get nasty. In IDPA, all you will ever get is some trinket and in many clubs, not even that. Any large prizes are given by chance, not by competition. This removes all the monetary incentives and allows people to focus on their skills.



Remember to pack things to keep your comfy. Bug spray, sun block, some water, and don't pack the range bag as if you are shooting for weeks. Try to keep the gear simple. I bring my pistol in a gun case which then goes back to the car, or finds a home somewhere out of the way. I then carry my safety gear, ammo and spare mags in a small range bag that is easy to carry around.



Above all, have fun.



IDPA # CL133
 

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Thanks for the beginners advice. I will be shooting my first IPSC match in the near future and was getting confused reading the rules online. The indoor range near my house hosts an IPSC match every Monday night.
 
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