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Are the M&P's dry or wet pistols ? I mean do they work with little oil or do they need lots of oil ? For example the 1911 is a wet gun , the Glock is a dry gun . Any information is appreciated . I am still kinda new to these and I'm learning.
 

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Seven drops of oil is all it takes. Listed oil points in owners manual. One drop per site. Some guys don't even do that, and they seem to keep going with out a hitch.

Are the M&P's dry or wet pistols ? I mean do they work with little oil or do they need lots of oil ? For example the 1911 is a wet gun , the Glock is a dry gun . Any information is appreciated . I am still kinda new to these and I'm learning.
 

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I use Slide Glide grease and at lot more than the 7 points in the manual.
 

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I use Slide Glide grease and at lot more than the 7 points in the manual.
I used to oil mine quite a bit as I was coming from a 1911 background. However my pistol told me I was oiling it too much by splattering me with oil, and kept doing it until I got the message. :rambo:
 

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Pretty dry.

After a good coating of general CLP everywhere, I wipe mine down and lightly hit the rails and barrel hood. That's it. Multiple guns, tens of thousands of rounds, since 2009.;l

Jeff
 

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I'd say that M&Ps are dry pistols. I use very little oil or other lube. Some say you should break them in wet but I don't think it's necessary. At least in my experiences.
 

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It CAN run very dry.

However, like most pistols, having enough lubricant to cover areas where parts slide on each other to some thickness would be better.
 

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Pretty dry.

After a good coating of general CLP everywhere, I wipe mine down and lightly hit the rails and barrel hood. That's it. Multiple guns, tens of thousands of rounds, since 2009.;l

Jeff
Pretty much what I do. Modern polymer pistols can run pretty dry, not completely of course, but not like a 1911 or other all steel pistols. If that's your background then M&P's, Glocks, etc. can take some getting used to.
 

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For what ever reason I never believed the manual when I read 7 points for a drop a piece. I know many people that do that only and the pistols are like Swiss watches. I and others on the other hand lightly coat effectively the entire surface upon which friction will occur. The comparative overuse of lubricant in the form of CLP or Hoppes oil has shown no adverse conditions. The only thing that does not get coated are springs and the like.
 

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Other than it's messy and attracts dirt while carrying. Either way, is effective. I feel S&W knows a little more about guns than I do. JMHO

For what ever reason I never believed the manual when I read 7 points for a drop a piece. I know many people that do that only and the pistols are like Swiss watches. I and others on the other hand lightly coat effectively the entire surface upon which friction will occur. The comparative overuse of lubricant in the form of CLP or Hoppes oil has shown no adverse conditions. The only thing that does not get coated are springs and the like.
 

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I used to oil mine quite a bit as I was coming from a 1911 background. However my pistol told me I was oiling it too much by splattering me with oil, and kept doing it until I got the message. :rambo:
I'll second that... nothing like covering your face and shooting glasses in oil. Good for the complexion tho.

Frog lube on 7 points (plus the couple extra spots that have worn the parkerization off)
 

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I go with the 7 spots 1 drop as per the manual

Too much oil draws in dirt etc. even if I dont shoot my carry gun for a couple weeks Ill take it down clean and oil it at least once every couple weeks. Amazing the amount of dust bunnies and skin etc in a gun that has been IWB carried for two weeks.
See no need to add extra oil to hold the stuff and Ive shot at least 1k rounds thru my shield in last 10 months and it shows no excessive wear.
 

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A small amount of a quality product goes a long way when applied according to the product's directions and the gun's manual. I use weapon shield; small amount of grease on the rails; drop of oil on other areas; remove any excess; light wipe down other metal surfaces. As noted, too much product can attract dirt, residue, etc.
 

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Dunk that M&P in a bucket of 10W30, shake it off, towel it down and call it good. :laughing:
 

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I don't live in a dry dusty environment. I also would like to think that one of these days, when I die, my kids will be able to use my guns for many years themselves, or give them to their kids to use. So I oil them up good. I still have wear on the metal tabs in the frame the rails slide on. I can see wear on the bottom of the slide from the sear, I can see wear on the barrel/chamber area. By wear I mean the finish is gone is spots. Even with what most folks call excess lube, its worn the finish off it multiple spots.

I don't mind the visible wear spots. How it functions/shoots is way more important to me than how it looks.

I may/may not run the car hard, same for the guns, and I want to be sure they are ready if I do so. And I want them to do it again, and again, and again, so I lube up to minimize wear as much as possible. No time outs in a gun fight.
 

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I use a non-nutritive cereal varnish. It's semi-permeable. It's not osmotic. What it does is, it coats and seals the gun. It's really nice.
 

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Amazing...all the different opinions. All I will add is read the manual and use common sense.
 

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My car owner's manual says to change the oil/filter every 7500 miles. Change the transmission fluid every 60,000 miles.

Why would I wait that long? So it wears more, wears out sooner, and I have to buy another one?

I know most folks will never shoot a gun enough to wear it out. Properly lubed or not.

The manufacturer's directions on lube are no better than their design. Which they've changed several times in the last 30 years. It changes based on experience - our experience and feedback, not theirs. They will never shoot as many rounds through the test guns as their buyers shoot through the purchased guns.

Why argue over cleaning/lubing? If it works, it works, how can you argue (unless you have nothing better to do) about varying methods that all work equally well.

If we all followed the manufacturer's recommendations no one would be shooting reloads in their guns. No one would have a loaded gun by their bed, or in the drawer. Does anyone use those ridiculous bicycle locks that come in the box with the gun? Where would the aftermarket vendors be for different sights, improved firing mechanism parts, etc.

Darn, started to say my S&W 9MM works just fine but in fact I still don't trust it. Between the trigger problems the day after I bought it to the latest issues with light strikes or bad primers (most likely hard primers) it will be awhile before I trust S&W's latest attempt to design and build a good semi auto as much as I trust my old 1911's. I'm working on it though. One range trip at a time.
 
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