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During a combat reload (emergency only, meaning slide is locked back) do you?

  • Use slide lock lever

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  • Weapon chambers automaticly

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Discussion Starter #1
Im curious as to how you guys preform your combat loading... i personally train myself the same way the english do and that is to rack the slide to chamber a round from a new mag... the reason for this is that when the excrement hits the oscillator, you lose your fine motor skills (among other things such as auditor exclusion, im sure some of you are familiar with this)...



Iv heard of people not being able to reload because they cant get there thumb to hit the slide lock lever, and that can be dangerous as every second counts in a fight for your life...
 

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PPCmaster said:
Iv heard of people not being able to reload because they cant get there thumb to hit the slide lock lever
You've only heard it. My thought is that if I can do something as simple as manipulating my index finger to pull the trigger, I can do something equally as simple such as sweeping my thumb downward to work the slide release. What scares me are complex movements such as raising my support hand to grasp the slide with equal pressure between my thumb and fingers to pull back and release the slide.



Yes I'm being sarcastic, but it is not directed at you as much as it is directed at the notion that working a slide release is a complex motion. Using the slide release is second nature to me, I do it without thinking. If the slide returns to battery on it's own, even better. YMMV.



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Discussion Starter #3
choochboost said:
[quote name='PPCmaster']Iv heard of people not being able to reload because they cant get there thumb to hit the slide lock lever
You've only heard it. My thought is that if I can do something as simple as manipulating my index finger to pull the trigger, I can do something equally as simple such as sweeping my thumb downward to work the slide release. What scares me are complex movements such as raising my support hand to grasp the slide with equal pressure between my thumb and fingers to pull back and release the slide.



Yes I'm being sarcastic, but it is not directed at you as much as it is directed at the notion that working a slide release is a complex motion. Using the slide release is second nature to me, I do it without thinking. If the slide returns to battery on it's own, even better. YMMV.[/quote]



Iv only heard this because i have been fortunate enough not to have ever been involved in a shooting... and these were their experiences... its reported that majority of folks even a short time after the shooting have lost so much fine motor skills they were unable to touch thumb to finger (less complex then thumb to slide lock IMO)...
 

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I have not been in a shooting and my level of training might be more than most but I am far from an "operator" or gun school junkie. I shared my opinion with the postscript of YMMV. It's okay if people disagree with me. I don't agree with everything I've been trained to do. I just don't see how working a slide release is any more complicated than working a trigger, especially when it is a movement that is second nature. If I can't work a slide release, I'll have more trouble dropping the mag in the first place.



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depends on the gun and the operating controls - generally, the using the slide stop lever works good - hand over method works as well and is more of a gross motor skill movement. For defensive purposes, using the hand over method of releasing the slide during an emergency reload is probably the most widely taught method from my experience.
 

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You will have the least difficulty doing what you have practiced the most when under extreeme stress. If my weapons slide releases with ease and goes into battery RELIABLY I will use the thumb release. If it doesn't I will fix, or get rid of it. IMHO
 

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I agree with Chooch. If you don't have enough dexterity to thumb the slide lock, then you aren't going to have enough dexterity to thumb the mag release.



You will do as you have trained. One good reason to train the slingshot method is platform adaptability. You will be able to grab most any pistol, and ready it with the slingshot method; no fumbling around trying to find the slide lock. I understand this is more applicable to military/LEO because they are more likely to be in a firefight with other weapons. But you never know.
 

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PPCmaster said:
Im curious if you have been in a high risk situation where you had to pull your weapon from your waste band? I mean you speak so sure that loosing your motor skills wont affect you in any way and you will be able to this... or even your level of DT training...


All the more reason to take internet advice with a grain of salt - Everyone has a different perspective and background -
 

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YukonGlocker said:
One good reason to train the slingshot method is platform adaptability. You will be able to grab most any pistol, and ready it with the slingshot method; no fumbling around trying to find the slide lock. I understand this is more applicable to military/LEO because they are more likely to be in a firefight with other weapons. But you never know.
I took a Kapap advanced tactical handgun class where this was incorporated into the training. The Israelis train in such a way that it works across the board. That's part of the reason why they do not carry with one in the chamber.



Bryan W said:
All the more reason to take internet advice with a grain of salt - Everyone has a different perspective and background -
Chew the fruit and spit out the seeds.



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Discussion Starter #10
Bryan W said:
[quote name='PPCmaster']



Im curious if you have been in a high risk situation where you had to pull your weapon from your waste band? I mean you speak so sure that loosing your motor skills wont affect you in any way and you will be able to this... or even your level of DT training...


All the more reason to take internet advice with a grain of salt - Everyone has a different perspective and background -[/quote]



Indeed
 

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Bryan W said:
hand over method works as well and is more of a gross motor skill movement. For defensive purposes, using the hand over method of releasing the slide during an emergency reload is probably the most widely taught method from my experience.


Exactly right. Hand-over-slide release is more of a gross motor movement, and is applicable to more weapons (the slide release is not in the same place on all semiauto handguns; slide usually is). Plus some guns (Browning HPs, and the earliest M&Ps for example) have pretty small slide releases.



Try this test: Load one round in one mag, one round in a second mag, and clock your shot-to-shot times including the reload. Run it a dozen or so times with each different type of slide-releasing technique -- hand-over, slide-release button, slingshot -- you want to consider. Include the times when you miss or fumble hitting the slide release. Then use the technique that's fastest for you.



I shot the 1911 for decades before ever considering any technique except hitting the slide release. Then I started using different techniques and putting them to the test with a timer. I now use the hand-over technique exclusively. Your mileage may vary.



Cheers,

Whisper
 

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If you lack the motor skill to hit the slide stop lever, then how are you able to hit the mag release? Both buttons are roughly the same size on all pistols.



ANyways, with an M&P the slide typically goes forward on its own when doing a speed reload. With all guns I train to run the slide withmy hand over the top.
 

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I rack the slide. the slide is in the same place on every gun. the slide release is not. Therefore I can stay the course without having to think. Just do.
 
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