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Yesterday I went to the range for an hour and put 250 rounds through my M&P.



I started off fine, I'm new and not a great shot but I normally have a decent grouping at 25 feet. Usually its a a couple inches low and to the right (I am left handed) but its usually only slightly low-left so I adjust by aiming up a little left and higher.



After my first 50 rounds it seemed like my shots were getting worse. Everything was so far right and low that I was even missing the 12" target. I would aim for the top left corner and if lucky would hit the bottom right corner (and this is only at 25 feet). I had two paper targets hanging next to each other and at one point, I shot at the left one and hit the right one. It was actually a little embarrassing.



Then around my 225th shot of the day my M&P jammed for the first time since I got it last December (about 1000 rounds ago). It didn't extract the shell casing of a fired round but still tried to chamber the next one, which really wedged the shell into the barrel. That just ticked me off.



I was really trying to remember everything I've been learning over the internet about proper technique. I was using the grip from the you-tube video that everyone keeps posting. I was being carefull not to limp-wrist, even going so far as to apply equal or more force with my non-dominate hand. I was taking my time between shots and controlling my breathing as best I could. But it just seemed that as the day went on I kept getting worse and worse.



I would blame my M&P but that would be to easy, it was probably my fault. I just wish I knew what I was doing wrong.
 

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I don't know what to say about the jam- but wrt the shooting- how did you shoot it the last several times you went out? I've had some really good days shooting and some where I just packed up and left in frustration. I'd be surprised if the gun actually went down hill in accuracy that quick.



Focus completely on the front sight. While focusing on the front sight use a controlled pull on the trigger. Pull it straight back. Try to use only the pad of the trigger finger. If I were a betting man I'd say you are either pushing the trigger or flinching. When it jumps from one target to the other though that might be a bad flinch- use some dummy rounds mixed in your mag and see what your muzzle does when the trigger releases.



Good luck!



EDIT: I wouldn't adjust the aim.. get a bigger target or move it closer.
 

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sounds like you were getting tired.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
use some dummy rounds mixed in your mag and see what your muzzle does when the trigger releases.


I like that tip. I'll randomly load a snap-cap and see if I notice what I'm doing wrong. When I dry-fire at home I *know* that its not going to fire so perhaps I don't flinch in front of the mirror but when I'm at the range I may just not realize that that is what I'm doing.



I'll keep working at it.



and Jester, I probably was getting tired too. It was an indoor range and the AC was not working very well on a muggy day.
 

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If you are a lefty shooting low and right, I'd suggest you are milking the grip. Which basically boils down to not isolating the trigger finger and having too much sympathetic movement from your other fingers on your storng hand.



I've had this problem very badly in the past, and the best way to fight it is to notice what sypmathetic movement you are getting, and do dryfire practice with draws or picking up the gun and take one "shot" while trying to eliminate you bad habit. You REALLY want your weak hand to be doing most of the gripping.



Additionally, some guns can really amplify the negative effects of milking the grip. If you have large hands with long fingers like me, probably the worst gun for this si a 1911 with a flat mainspring housing. For me, a curved mainspring housing fixes it up about 80%.



For the M&P, try changing gripstraps. depending on hand shape, the large may fill the hand properly or push the upper part of your hand away and leave a gap at the bottom.
 

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Jester said:
sounds like you were getting tired.


I agree. Just got sloppy. I usually really focus and shoot real good at first then get lazy and out of the blue pop a couple all over the place.
 

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Get a good .22 cal pistol and practice with it.

Your most likely flinching or anticipating recoil to be that far off at 25ft. .

I know when my groups start looking bad running a few mags through the .22 helps me.



nunnya

P.S. Everyone who shoots should have a good .22 (cheap to shoot and fun).
 

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choochboost said:
[quote name='nunnya']Get a good .22 cal pistol and practice with it.

Your most likely flinching or anticipating recoil to be that far off at 25ft. .

I know when my groups start looking bad running a few mags through the .22 helps me.



nunnya

P.S. Everyone who shoots should have a good .22 (cheap to shoot and fun).
I agree 100%. Shooting my .22 is not only fun but also very helpful.[/quote]



x2 - When I get to the range, I usually warm up with my 22.. Then I start shooting the M&P.. It does help.. And after a few hundred rounds.. Your eyes will get tired.. I know mine does.. There are times, when I am at the range, I just take a break from shooting and observe others..



Ben
 
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