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How accurate is dry firing? I can dry fire all day long and probably 90% of the time my front sight doesn't move. Does that mean I'm shooting straight and how accurate is this to real bullets? I know this should help my shooting but am I really going to shoot as perfect as this every time? I can dry fire and pull the trigger as fast as I can cycle my gun and the front sight never moves.
 

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Dry firing - with many - many reps, is muscle training. Paying attention to the workings of your gun's trigger -squeeze the round off. When your POI is in your sights, squeeze. When it drifts out (because of your involuntary movement) stop the process. Continue when your target moves back into the sight. Try to surprise yourself with the click. Never rush the trigger pull because the target is in the sight. Then, when shooting the real stuff, just mimic your training. You can actually teach yourself that the process of squeezing the trigger does not cause pain or damage to your body and that flinching is not required. Some people advocate that real training comes from dry firing and that shooting live ammo is just a test to see how much you've learned. That is, you should dry fire many times more than actually shooting live rounds.
 

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I'm a firm believer in dry fire practice. It has helped me tremendously. And it has helped new shooters I have taught to shoot.



Sometimes I will go to the range and have a bad day. I won't shoot as good as normal. When this happens I come home, do some dry fire practice, and get back to the basics. I then go back to the range and shoot really good.



Dry fire practice works. And the best thing about it: It's free.
 

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It is cool that it's free and I can do it anywhere. I actually check after I load a snap cap to make sure it's a snap cap. Last thing I want to do is think I have a snap cap and put a hole in the wall.



I do practice like it's real. I dont ever really know when the gun is going to click. I just had a hard time believing that with my sights not moving I was really a good shot. The thread asking about shooting 2 inch groups at 25 yards came to mind as I didn't think I could shoot that well.
 

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Dry fire doesn't always help accuracy. It depends on what problems you are trying to fix. For some, it's not really of any use.





As for hampering accuracy, I have found it CAN be quite detrimental uner soe circumstances.



Namely shooting a DA/SA gun with a significant difference in trigger pull between DA ans SA, I found using DA all the time in dryfire had taught me to expect a 9lb trigger pull, and other than the first shot on a stage it was all really a 4lb SA pull. WHich reuslted in me shooting low or low-left a lot. Took me about a month to figure out what caused it, and about a month to break the habit.



For the M&P I cock it, first shot is real dryfire, the rest of the string of dryfire is just working the trigger without cocking it. With the longer pre-travel of the trigger job, it's the best analog of a stage I cna get dry-firing.
 

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Maybe I should start a new thread with this, but I'll post it here.

With all the dry fire talk here and on other threads, I have started

the practice of dry firing.

I've discovered that about 70 percent of the time my front sight jumps

slightly to the left everytime the striker falls. This is not due to a loose front sight, but the entire end of the gun "jerks".

It is very slight and I would not have known I was doing this if it wasn't for dry firing.

Any thoughts, I'm open for suggestions?

I have done a trigger job, probably still have around a 5 lb pull.

I also have just a slight bit of over travel left.
 

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Your grip is off just a little.



Usually 1 or both of these issues:

1. You are squeezing too hard with your trigger hand, and not enough with your support hand.

2. Your finger is not on the trigger far enough, and you are pushing the muzzle sideways instead of pulling straight back.



You have to have the correct grip to get the correct trigger pull. Your finger has to be on the trigger at the correct spot to get the correct trigger pull also. What grip insert are you using?? If you are not using the small, then go down a size. Then try to adjust your grip and trigger finger position until everything snaps without breaking your sight picture.
 

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YukonGlocker:

I was using the med grip and have since changed to the small grip.

It has helped a lot, but being a thumbs forwrd guy, I think I might have an issue with the slide lock now.

I'll check how tight my grip is on the trigger hand next, you might have something there.

For what it's worth, I've been shooting my 1911 the last couple years and the M&P trigger is a change for me.
 

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I found my rather nasty trigger jerk through dry-fire. I've worked on it a bit and my last time at the range showed marked improvement. A-zoom snap caps are nice, I just wish they weren't so expensive.
 
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