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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Friends, After spending a couple months deciding on 1.) Whether or not to get into and try reloading my own ammo , 2.) Single stage vs Progressive and 3.) Which brand reloader and the components/equipment I would need to make the task as simple/dummy proof as possible and I tell you considering all the suggestions and advice I received from you fellows....making a choice was a whole lot easier. Considering I knew I was going to be reloading 45 acp, 380, 9mm and 40 S&W and would in all likelyhood want a progressive rather shortly I decided on a Dillon 550B with the Dillon Quick Change Conversion Kits to make things easier for me to switch back and forth between calibers.

Keeping in mind I've never set eyes on a brass caartrdge centerfire reloader in my life ---unpacking the damn thing last Friday was overwhelming. :roll: Anyway, I finally got things together, cleaned the brass, etc. and by Monday I felt I had it setup for 45's about as good as I could get it for now. (I don't know about any of you, but have you ever reached a point with your computer that you felt like throwing the SOB in the lake?) "I was about there a couple times" ha

We went to the range that evening after dinner and I put the M&P 45 through it's paces using the 50 rounds I had reloaded. Boy did I feel good.....everything worked great.....no FTF's, FTE, etc. the pistol cycled perfectly and the groups were pretty good at 30' considering I was concentrating on everything but accuracy. Maybe that was beginners luck, but I'll take it.


As soon as I finish reloading the rest of the 45's I have(200-300 I plan on converting to the 40S&W and see how my little 40c likes not so new ammo. ha

Something nice about the 550b is that it allows you to treat it like a single stage unit so you can check everything stage by stage to decrease any really bad mess up's. Nothing papanoid about me.



Thanks for all your help here and elsewhere at M&P Forum.

Jim
 

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There's a real sense of satisfaction when you shoot the ammo you have personally reloaded, it's a grand feeling!
 

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Need manual advice...

coltman1985 said:
Get a good reloading manual and read it 3 times before you load a cartridge!!! SAFETY!!
I can relate to JimK66's post. I have never reloaded but we (my wife, son & I), kind of hold off shooting as much as we would like due to ammo costs. We shoot lots of 9mm, some 380 caliber, lots of 40 caliber, quite a bit of 38+P and 357 magnum and some 45 caliber but limit our range visits to about once a month.

Reloading may be for us. coltman1985; what reloading manuals or books do you reccomend.
 

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There are a number of good manuals, I like the Speer and Hornady manuals, the Hodgdon manual is pretty good, in addition the Lyman manual is good since it lists a lot of information on reloading lead bullets. Keep in mind that brand specific books like the Speer book lists loadings using their bullets, and the Hodgdon manual using their powders, although you can generally adapt and use a different brand of bullet with similar characteristics, a .224 55 grain hollow point is going to be pretty similar no matter what brand it is.



In addition there is lots of information available online, here's a few examples:



Hodgdon, IMR and Winchester powders http://data.hodgdon.com/main_menu.asp



Accurate Arms powders: http://www.accuratepowder.com/loaddata_caliber.htm



Always start at the starting loads and work up, a common beginner error is to start at the max load, NEVER start at the max load, and if only one powder charge is listed, it is the max, and always start 10% below that.



You will find that each book is different, so ALWAYS use at least 2 different books, there are some errors in these things, so you want to check them against each other, since the loads listed will usually be different, usually only 1 or 2 tenths difference but sometimes more than that, I use the lower one, or sometimes split the difference between the two.
 

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I've been thinking about starting to reload. I run through 100-150 9mm a week (if my wife doesn't come too) along with 50-100 .380 and rifle rounds if I take them (7.65x53, 7.62x54R and .223) I'm spending more money on ammo per week that I am on gas.
 

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Adam5 said:
I've been thinking about starting to reload. I run through 100-150 9mm a week (if my wife doesn't come too) along with 50-100 .380 and rifle rounds if I take them (7.65x53, 7.62x54R and .223) I'm spending more money on ammo per week that I am on gas.


Here's a good place to start:

http://www.brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html#which
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have the Lyman and Speer reloading handbooks and aside from the reloading data sheets I found little applicable help in them. I got enough theory/history in 8 years of undergraduate and graduate studies. Bottom line-----give me applied info.


Any of you guy's use Rainier LeadSafe bullets? If so where do you get your load info for them? I'm going to be loading 40S&W, 9mm and 380 cal ammo with the Rainier bullets.

Any help is appreciated.

Jim
 

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G56 said:
[quote name='Adam5']I've been thinking about starting to reload. I run through 100-150 9mm a week (if my wife doesn't come too) along with 50-100 .380 and rifle rounds if I take them (7.65x53, 7.62x54R and .223) I'm spending more money on ammo per week that I am on gas.


Here's a good place to start:

http://www.brianenos.com/pages/dillon.html#which[/quote]



Thanks for the link :wink:
 

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JimK66 said:
Any of you guy's use Rainier LeadSafe bullets? If so where do you get your load info for them? I'm going to be loading 40S&W, 9mm and 380 cal ammo with the Rainier bullets.

Any help is appreciated.

Jim


From Rainier's website:

"We, at Rainier Ballistics, recommend using lead bullet load data when loading our bullets. There is no need for adjustment when using lead bullet load data. Our bullets are jacketed using an electroplating process and are softer than traditionally jacketed bullets; hence the recommendation to use lead bullet load data. If you only have access to traditionally jacketed load data, we recommend reducing maximum charge by 10%. A roll or taper crimp may be used with our bullets; do not over crimp."

http://www.rainierballistics.com/mainframe.htm
 

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Pay now to save later...

I just went to the Brian Enos web site to check it out. Good info. I bought some brian Enos Slide Glide Lite a while back and it's good stuff. I also have the newest Blue Press manual with Dillon equiptment advertised. The Square Deal "B" is the second lowest set up at $319.95 plus extras & shipping bring it to $782.59. That's before you buy the actual makings of the bullets. Probably about $1,000.00 (?) investment to make the 1st batch of bullets. I can see how you would save some money in the long run by reloading but in the short run it's is almost cost prohibitive. I'm not poor (by who's standards?) but somewhat frugal and cost concious. The initial outlay is why I have put off making this decision for so long. :roll:

Still not convinced that reloading is the way for me to go. It would be great if several shooting buddies formed a little bullet making consortium (?) and went in together to make all their ammo. Anyone ever tried that?
 

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My advice would be to start with a single stage press. It's a lower initial investment and can produce quality ammo. For me the debate between progressive and single stage is how much money is your time worth? I reload shotshells on a MEC progressive and can produce about 400 rounds an hour. I load centerfire pistol and rifle on a single stage and can produce about 200 rounds an hour. I used to shoot a lot more shotshells than centerfire but now that my wife likes to shoot her new M&P 40 a lot, I'll probably be investing in a progressive centerfire setup.



I wholeheartedly agree with the advice to buy 2 or 3 manuals and read them extensively from cover to cover. By the way, reloading can become habit forming and is almost as enjoyable as shooting.



Ain't never been a horse that couldn't be rode

and never been a rider that couldn't be throwed.
 

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I like the Dillon XL650 with the casefeeder and the powder check system!! It is worth the extra $ in my opinion. G56 has a good list of books and etc. to read!! DO NOT LET YOURSELF BE DISTRACTED WHILE RELOADING!! Some should not even have the radio on!! The last thing you want your gun to do is swallow a squib before a good round goes boom or to get an over/double charge!! Both are not good for gun, shooter, innocent bystanders. Reloading can be very fun and relaxing, but it is still very, very, very serious stuff!!



I like the idea of being able to customize my loads and being able to have 10,000 rounds not assembled laying around waiting for me!!
 

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Re: Pay now to save later...

TxPhantom said:
I just went to the Brian Enos web site to check it out. Good info. I bought some brian Enos Slide Glide Lite a while back and it's good stuff. I also have the newest Blue Press manual with Dillon equiptment advertised. The Square Deal "B" is the second lowest set up at $319.95 plus extras & shipping bring it to $782.59. That's before you buy the actual makings of the bullets. Probably about $1,000.00 (?) investment to make the 1st batch of bullets. I can see how you would save some money in the long run by reloading but in the short run it's is almost cost prohibitive. I'm not poor (by who's standards?) but somewhat frugal and cost concious. The initial outlay is why I have put off making this decision for so long. :roll:

Still not convinced that reloading is the way for me to go. It would be great if several shooting buddies formed a little bullet making consortium (?) and went in together to make all their ammo. Anyone ever tried that?


I read a lot of posts saying to buy Dillon. I could afford Dillon's price but after considerable study concluded they were to pricy for what you get. When I started 7 months back I purchased Lee's Pro 1000. The entire setup including Frankford Arsenal's tumbler for 9MM and .40 Cal was well under $300. I have since loaded over 8000 rounds of very effective ammo. Based on purchases of the lowest cost ammo i am aware of I, can with ease save $50 per thousand using quality components. The low cost ammo I am refering to (Blazer Alluminum Case) has resulted in destruction of 2 barrels in my M&P9. If low cost components are used the savings rise. The only mistake I made was not buying the Lee Loadmaster for approx. $70 more. The loadmaster will handle rifle ammo and has 5 stations allowing use of a factory crimp Die after the bullet seating Die.



You will pay more for the Dillon case feeder than an entire Lee system including their simple low cost case feeder.



A word of caution: Some people are not good with mechanical devices such as bullet loading systems. If you are one of them save your money and purchase factory ammo.



This is my opinion and I am quite certain others have a different one.



Enjoy.
 

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Re: Pay now to save later...

Quote TOF;

A word of caution: Some people are not good with mechanical devices such as bullet loading systems. If you are one of them save your money and purchase factory ammo.



This is my opinion and I am quite certain others have a different one.



Thanks TOF. I have a feeling you know what you are talking about. :wink:
 

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Here's some comments from some satisfied Lee customers, copied from the net:



Lee presses. I grew up using Lee products and will still use their dies but I recently broke 2 of their presses. Now I will say the one that lasted the longest was the cheap "C" style and it loaded A LOT of different ammo including full length sized .300 ultra mag brass. It was working well and I was resizing some .308. Well, it snapped in two right there where the spent primers go. Completely broke in two!. Well, beside it I had the Lee " O " press and was neck sizing some .308. Not a very serious pressure issue, know what I mean? Well, it snapped where the loading handle goes into the link bracket thing. Completely useless.

I ordered a Lyman turret press and HOLY CRAP, what a difference! I can full length size .454 Casull brass by almost just using the weight of the lever itself. The press must weigh 30 lbs. It is really nice. I seriously doubt it will break regardless of what I'm doing to it.

So, goodbye Lee presses.



Posted :: 9/20/2005 9:37:28 AM EDT

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Okay I currently have a Lee precision 1000 loader or some such crap. And honestly that is what it is. Crap. It doesn't work worth a damn for a progressive reloader. It isn't horrible, but it takes ALOT of time the primer feed is ****, and you have to jack with it constantly, and it is just a PITA in general. Not to mention having to have a 4 die after you load your bullets to crimp them.



Posted:: 1/5/2007

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I had a Lee Progressive 1000. You called it right. It was a piece of crap.



Posted 1/5/2007

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I made the mistake of buying a Lee Annaversary kit once, Within 6 months I had replaced everything save the autoprime with RCBS equipment.



Now I like some of lee's dies and I love the companys case trimmers, But I firmly believe that the ONLY people that will tell you thar buying Lee equipment is worthwile are people who have yet to use anything better.



Posted 1/8/2007

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Same experience as krochus! I don't buy any thing Lee except their pistol dies. I have thrown away most every thing else Lee I ever bought. KN



Posted 1/8/2007

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Like Krochus, and KN said, I also made the "HUGE" mistake of starting out on a LEE Aniversery kit. Even with zero knowlage of handloading, I quickly realized that the entire kit except for the Auto-Prime was nothing but cheap made junk. I very quickly built a set up with a mix of RCBS, and Redding equipment, and it was definately the right decision. I gave away that rickety press, and tossed the rest in the trash.



Posted 1/8/2007

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Thats right. I picked up my lee anniversary kit from my local cabela's at about noon today. Set it all up and started loading up some 10mm slowly around 3pm.

6:30pm - after I had finished up my 10mm, i was de-priming some .45, and the arm had worked it way out a little so that it was secured by only one hole, and it SNAPPED a piece of the press that secures the handle in place!!!

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"It never ceases to amaze me that in this modern age of information dissemination that people will still pay money for the LEE anniversary kit. I bought one at a Pawnshop new in the box so I could move my operation from a buddies house. Within 20 rounds the handle broke off in the press,the infernal measure always leaked and the scale was impossible to zero. At this point I've replaced everything except the hand primer,funnel and chuck for the trimmer."

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Got home from the range and began to take the primers out of my rounds. Simple press, one die at a time. Pulled the handle down, applied some pressure and heard a light ping sound. Looked down and where the rod slides into the press, a large chunk of metal broke off. Now you have no place for the handle to grab leverage to pull the ram down. I'm about ready to send it back for replacement, only a few months old, but will the same thing keep happening to my press?

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I bought a LEE Reloader; broke on the first stroke (still using it as a powder measure/flare station).



Bought a LEE Challanger; broke first session (still in box under bench).

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I would like to strangle the engineer who designed the standoffs for my Lee turret press....



The idiot used rolled/flat threads to go into a cast iron base instead of a full thread which would have provided proper bearing surface...



So the front standoff on my press pulled out of the base and ripped the threads out with it. I guess I get to find out how good Lee's customer service is now.

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The tragedy of it all is that beginners (in this and in many other things) are the ones who need good equipment the most, but are least likely to invest in it.

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Frustrating hard to use non user friendly equipment is NOT a good way to get into reloading. If you're still using the lee safety scale i feel sorry for you. Try a real scale sometime and see what i mean.

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I still can't see why anybody would settle for the Aniversery kit, when you can buy the RCBS Partner kit(same level starter) for nearly exactly the same price, and get extremely high quality equipment? I fully understand the logic as far as not sinking a pile of money into a hobby that you're just testing the waters in. I just can't see buying low quality alluminum/plastic equipment that's not held to any reasonable tollerances when you can get high quality cast/steel equipment that's machined very tight for the same money.



Like's been mentioned here already, the scale in the Aniversery kit is borderline dangerous know matter how good it might work for a while under perfect circumstances. The "perfect Roll Eyes" measure is PLASTIC! Not only does finer ball powder seep out around the metering drum, and spill all over the place, but after a few hundred drops of something aggressive like IMR 4831 the top of the metering chamber gets chewed up so bad it's pathetic.



Like I said early in this thread, I started out with the Aniversery myself because of the money. Yes, I even loaded some very accurate ammo, even for the tempermental 22 Hornet on that set-up, but had the RCBS Partner kit been available then, I'd have likely never started up-grading right off the bat. The argument was made here about buying a Pinto, or a Porsche. Quite frankly in this case it'd be more like buying a Pinto, or buying a nice Camaro for the same money. Either would definately get me from point A to point B, but it'd be quicker, and a much more enjoyable trip in the Camaro.

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STOP! THINK! Do you really want a pot-metal press?



I thought I did (needed a second press to complement my Bonanza Co-Ax) so I got a Lee Reloader press. Broke the handle stop lugs the first time I pushed the handle. Kept it anyway (holds up my powder measure).



So I bought a Lee Challenger. It lasted longer than the Reloader, but I still broke it during the first session.

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In my opinion, the most expensive press to buy is the Lee. Why? Because sooner or later you'll get interested enough in reloading and break down and buy what you should have bought in the first place: a Dillon.

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Primeer feed is plastic and doesn't work reliably. Primers are fed in a plastic chute from the weight of the primers stacked in the chute and they get cocked sideways or upside down---often! Bullet feeder is plastic and doesn't work. You get what you pay for with Lee.

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HIGHLY RECOMMEND buying quality (RCBS, Lyman, Dillon, Redding, Hornady, or the best - Forster/Bonanza Co-Ax), and having no worries.



Own two Lees, both broken. Also own Lyman, Bonanza, and Dillon.



Ever hear of a broken RCBS? or Lyman Crusher 2?

Buy a high-quality press and it will last many life-times; buy a Lee and you may be sending it back that same week.......

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My Lee Auto Prime hand-tool has apparent cracking/linear metal fatigue (in the chromed alloy body) of the shellholder's top groove, leading to patchy performance in seating primers.It is now unserviceable.



The guarentee is for 2 years only...yes, it is over that - of course....

I have contacted the Lee Precision factory by email, but have no reply.

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Thanks fellas, still havn't heard from LEE, but feel that the alloy body is to blame.



"POTMETAL" is a good description !

But I [sadly] take the point that quality is paramount

And what do I do with the special short shellholders at $6AUD each...as they fit nothing else ? So I am stuck, my friends, with any help I may [or may not] get from the factory.



I can only advise anyone NOT to buy a soft alloy bodied prime-tool.

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Buy RCBS press when your Lee breaks. Buy RCBS hand-primer when your Lee breaks.



Speaking from experience; own Lee Reloader and Challenger (both broken)

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STOP buying Lee and buy some quality tools, like the superb RCBS hand-priming tool(s) I bought after blowing out two properly-lubed Lees (same failure - cracked pot metal body).



Own two RCBS tools now (redundancy - taught by Lee) and extremely satisfied. No trouble.

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Recommend Lyman (because Lee presses are generally NOT durable)

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Used a Lee Powder measurer for almost a year. The only positive comment I can make about them is they work. They do not dispense very evenly and they hate fine ball powder. It jams the entire mechanism. Spend the extra $50 and get a better dispenser.

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Best price is $0, because your friend will be much better served by taking his money and buying some quality used equipment, like RCBS.

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I have not known anyone personally who has gotten the Lee Pro 1000 Priming system to work correctly. Even the "unofficial Lee reloading" site states in the "Pro 1000 detailed review" that that guy even primes by hand because of the problems. I am the type of person that expects every part of a piece of equipment to operate like it's advertised. Maybe I'm naive, but I'm glad that Dillon caters to naive folks. Their presses will do exactly what they say they will do.

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Get the RCBS Rockchunker. I have both an RCBS Rockchunker and a Lee Turrett press. The lee is a cheaply made press and it feels like it will fall apart with every pull of the handle. My Rockchunker is solid and smooth. RCBS is well worth the extra price.

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I had one of the Lee progressives. It was the worst piece of junk I'd ever used. After a short hiatus, I got back into reloading and bought an RCBS Rockchucker. Don't know how many rounds are through it, but it's still going strong. Great customer service, too.

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I had a lee loadmaster. Used it for about 2 and a half years and I then started having problems with it. Every time that I went to use it, I spent 30 min fixing it so I could use it. To me, it started to become very unreliable. If I had to fix it every time that I wanted to use it, what was the quality of bullets that came out of it. I decided to call lee. They said that lee presses only have a 2-year warranty on them and that I would have to pay to have the press refurbished. So I started thinking to myself, I don't even have 2000 rounds reloaded on this press and I will have to pay to have it refurbished. The amount that I would have to pay was 1/3 of what I paid for the press in the first place. To me, and this is just my opinion, if lee is such a great company and the claim to have such a great product, then why don't they have a lifetime warranty like Dillon does to back up there product?

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HIGHLY RECOMMEND avoiding the LEE presses; their other gear is decent.



The RCBS will satisfy you longer.........

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Why I have such a grudge against the Lee Slow 1000:

My wife bought the press for me as a Christmas present on our first "married" Christmas. We'd gotten the iead that it was a good press from a local friend. I struggled with the thing for over two months, and called the factory repeatedly. Nothing they advised every seemed to help for more than about 30 rounds. Only a few times did I get more than 20 rounds through it without a malfunction. The priming system was at fault over 95% of the time...the rest worked ok. I spoke to my frind who'd recommended the press and he said, "Oh! I forgot to tell you! I never use that priming system..it sucks!" Turns out, he runs every case through the first stage to deprime and size, then primes every case with a hand priming tool, and then runs the cases through the powder and crimp/seat stations in the press again. How the **** is this supposed to be "fast" doing it that way?

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I know I'm not the only sucker that has one of these cheap friggin measures. I can't seem to get the thing to hold the same charge for more than 3 or 4 case charges using 2400 h-110 aa#7 231 they alllll leak, some work better than others,I'm sick of the thing.Is lymann any better? What would ya'll recomend for a good measure?

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I have a Lee (Challenger, I think) single-stage press. When I am depriming/resizing my brass, regardless of caliber, it makes a loud "CLINK" sound about every 30 rounds or so. It's like it gets slightly stuck mid-way though. I'm always very careful to make sure the mouth of the brass is fed into the die before using pressure on the handle, so it's not that the brass isn't going in to the die. When I check the brass and the die afterwards, there's nothing apparently wrong at all. What is this noise?



answer:

I had the same problem with my Lee Challenger, frame was cracked on side (broken frame) closest to the handle. Made CLINK noise for some reason, and resistance was from brass twisting inside die. Hope you don't find this on yours, but have seen on more than just mine.

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I have used lots of different loading equipment in the last 45 years and the only problem I ever had was with a cheap Lee press. First time it broke, they replaced it. Second time, I trashed it.

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I had the Lee Press that came with the Anniversary Kit; an unmitigated piece of crap if I ever saw one. Avoid it like the plague.

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I JUST got back a bag of 5 primer sliders today. Wrecked 4 in less than an hour. Wnt over the press with a fine tooth comb and here's a list of parts that are going back:



carrier

draw bolt

ejector

yoke retainer

small primer trough

4 small primer sliders

1 primer punch return spring

.223 die (snapped off decapper pin).



Thats about $50 in parts. Lee has NO clue.. I beg them for help every time I send in parts (bout once a month for the last 4 months... had press for 6 months total).



I am not a mechanical moron... was an Airframe and Powerplant Mechanic for a few years... own my own mill and lathe.. I just can't figure out why small primers are kicking my but.



I am fully prepared for the 'Buy Dillon, don't look back' posts... if I could I would at this point BELIVE ME I WOULD.

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I bought one of those loadmasters, after hours of continual primer problems, I sent it back to MidWay, they credited my account....I now own a 650 dillon

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Actually if you read Lee's self promotional book, errrr loading manual you'll see Lee believes that people don't really want quality tools that are overbuilt to last a lifetime but instead want something cheap so that when it breaks they can just though it away and buy a new one. Not my words I'm just paraphrasing Mr. Lee.

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Thats right. I picked up my lee anniversary kit from my local cabela's at about noon today. Set it all up and started loading up some 10mm slowly around 3pm.

6:30pm - after I had finished up my 10mm, i was de-priming some .45, and the arm had worked it way out a little so that it was secured by only one hole, and it SNAPPED a piece of the press that secures the handle in place!!!

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Front Sight, the Journal of USPSA said that of the shooters that used reloaders at last years Nationals, 94.85% used Dillon presses while 2.01% used Lee reloaders.

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"Why are many Dillon advocates frequently so obnoxious? Always positively JUMPING to tell you they own one and how anything else is not worthy and how if you were cool like them you'd have one too."





because most of us have allready been down the road. I had a 1000 and a loadmaster. Bought the loadmaster cause i thought the 1000 was junk and found out the loadmaster was worse! I now have 5 dillons and wouldnt buy any other. There may be somethings that a couple other presses do better but overall you cant beat them. Plus there backed up by the best warantee of anything anywhere. I wonder how many Lee presses are sitting in closets unused because people just gave up trying to get them to load reliably. I dont remember a single loading session with one that didnt require some kind of dinking around with it. I know a couple of my square deals have over 100000 rounds on them and there still going strong. There starting to get a little loose but dillion has already sent the new bushings no charge. ther still working fine and i havent bothered to install them yet. They will even recondition a press for free even if you bought it used!

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When the Loadmaster came out I bought one right away. Bigest mistake of my life. Worst POS I have ever used. Had for about 6 months, didn't get 100 usable round in that whole time. On the phone with Lee repeatedly, sent it back twice, no improvement. The priming system is it's worst feature, there is a reason why every other manufacture primes cases on the rams downstroke, not on the upstroke when all other actions are also being done. Finaly sold for less that half of what I paid for just to get rid of it. Its been years and that guy still won't talk to me.

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I knew I was bursting some bubbles with this one.



Let me clarify the situation.



Nowhere did I say the Dillon equipment was no good nor did I say Lee equipment was superior. What I am saying is that those on budgets can build better ammo than they can buy for less with Lee Loaders. Lee loaders can and will break in various ways from time to time just as Dillon loaders will. Dillon has a lifetime warranty because their equipment breaks from time to time. You pay dearly for that warranty. Lee has a 2 year warranty. Long enough to determine what parts you should stock. I don’t like waiting for parts to be shipped anyway. I look my equipment over and purchase a maintenance kit. The one for my Lee system cost approx $20. I may have an advantage in that I spent 45 of the last 50 years developing small parts handling and manufacturing systems within the Electronic component industry that processed thousands of parts per hour. Home reloading is very simple in comparison.



If you can afford $1000 plus to setup and want to, then do so. If you would prefer to spend a lesser amount the Lee equipment can produce just as good ammo for less. There will be a rough spot or two getting started with either.



Let’s all try to remember some of the people asking for help and information on this forum may not be as comfortable financially as others. Please don’t leave them out.



Enjoy.
 

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Dillon has a lifetime warranty because their equipment breaks from time to time
I've never heard of a broken frame on a Dillon, I've only heard of one on an RCBS, but I've heard a number of cases of broken frames on Lee, it's fairly common when you use inferior materials like pot metal.



If you can afford $1000 plus to setup and want to, then do so. If you would prefer to spend a lesser amount the Lee equipment can produce just as good ammo for less.
A beginner can get quality equipment from good manufacturers for a very reasonable price, they don't have to accept second rate products to save money.



Lyman Crusher 2 Single Stage Press Pro Kit $153.99

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/...leitemid=548480



RCBS Partner Single Stage Press Reloading Kit $156.99

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/...leitemid=140616



Redding Big Boss Pro-Pak Reloading Kit $249.99

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/...leitemid=898448



RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Press Master Kit $249.99

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/...leitemid=646599
 
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