MP-Pistol Forum banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well, I finally got to the range ... Plenty of internet study, but nothing prepares you for the first time you're on the range, someone elses shot goes "BOOM" and you feel it reverbate through your chest and think to yourself, "Can I really do this?!"



Well, for those of you interested in a small story, it was my buddy and me with my mother in tow (she felt it was finally time to learn to shoot for home protection), all three of us new to handguns, with my only experience dating back to childhood with a .22 rifle.



Between us, 2 M&P9's both ordered from Bud's ... Prior to shooting, we field stripped and put some CLP on the friction (Oil Here) points.



True to form, my first shot was my best ... damn that target gets small out there, and over the course, I was really surprised to see just how much variance there can be, even if your aim is fairly steady dead center, from how you pull, squeeze, jerk, or anticipate that trigger.



I think I was most excited when successive rounds hit close to one another, even if not dead center of the target ... I could really appreciate consistency, but after awhile, it got difficult to see where or even if I hit the target. I'd have to rely on other eyes to say, yes, that was in the orange, or low and in the white. Any hints to seeing this better, short of putting a new target up every 5 rounds?



For the life of me, I don't know how the competition folks keep that barrel down ... I was expecting recoil to push back or at the very least, flex my wrists, but to my amazement, it's like the whole pistol is trying to jump straight-up!



Okay, yes, I'm a newbie, so you can get your *snickers* and *jeers* in, but all the reading in the world can't substitute for the experience of actually shooting.



My issue, and the same goes for my mother as well, is that I can be aiming dead-on, but the pressure required on that final portion of the trigger pull to get the striker to engage really interferes with my aim. I'm thinking about a trigger job, which I believe would improve this part of the "act of firing" but I'd like to be able to shoot it stock well first.



It wasn't long before the sights were blury, and "moving" despite my best attempts to hold the pistol still. I was tempted to play the "red barron game", trying to pull the trigger when the target "flew" its way to the center of the sight picture, but I soon found out that it doesn't work. Damn I hate it when I miss the target. It's frustrating, but I guess it all comes down to trigger control, and that's where I need to practice A LOT!



Between the 3 of us, I believe we came close to 100 rounds total, but I think my buddy got most of 'em. After a little over an hour, I was literally, exhausted. I'm guessing it gets easier and better with time, but it took a lot out of me mentally, and I doubt I could have held a full glass of water without spilling it! LOL!



I've got plenty of questions, like how to reduce the recoil so I can get back on target much faster. I swear those competition folks make it look like there's no recoil in their pistols whatsoever. If I were to try to shoot a second round quickly, it would probably hit the ceiling.



I've ordered some of Brian Enos' #1 Slide Glide lube and will use the CLP for cleaning. Any suggestions exactly on how to clean? The instructions in the cleaning kit were a bit sparse, and I don't want to make any rookie mistakes that could endanger the life, accuracy, and condition of my wonderful M&P9.



Mom is hooked, and yes, she outshot both my buddy and me! What is it with women and handguns?! Perhaps they're just more patient than men and can squeeze that trigger with finesse.



I'll post some followup questions later ... It's the day after, and I'm still a bit tired, but mentally energized from putting something important into practice.



Looking forward to your advice, recommendations, and helpful suggestions!




Best Regards,



Cet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Cet.,

Congrats on your first trip to the range. Actually shooting is very different then you would think from reading reports and seeing other people do it. I think the biggest thing to help with recoil and target acquisition is a proper grip and lots of practice. I highly recommend that you get some snap caps and practice dry firing constantly. Make sure you really pay attention to the position of your grip and that you are not jerking the trigger. This will help considerably but nothing can replace throwing some lead down range. Enjoy!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Reaper,



I don't know how many times I've watched that video, and I'm so amazed!




I do try to do what he says, but even so, the recoil pulls me WAAAAY off target ... Does the load that they're shooting have anything to do with it?



I was using Blazer Brass 115gr 9mm from Wally's.



Looking forward to my next trip too!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
Welcome aboard!!!!

Welcome to the wonderful world of shooting! You are gonna have a lot of fun as you improve. There is a great site to help you improve. www.sportshooter.com Good info on proper sight alignment, trigger control, & holding steady. Practice, SAFELY, dry firing at home. But be sure to follow all the gun safety rules.

You will find that a 9mm is a piece of cake to shoot. I have a MP40 that I love to shoot and don't notice the recoil very much. Maybe you need some instruction on how to hold your pistol when firing. Lots of info on this forum and many others. Explaining that you are new to shooting will get the experienced shooters attention and most are happy to help.

I use Enos' Slide Glide also. I really couldn't tell any difference in recoil but I feel it will certainly help the performance of your pistols.

As far as your mom being a good shot, a lot of us wouldn't be here if women couldn't shoot. Especially here in Texas. I have to be on my toes or my wife would be out shooting me!! She is a rather small woman but can handle a 45, 40, 357 and her S & W snub nose 38 with + p rounds and do well with each. Shoot a snub nose with 357 or 38 +p rounds and you wll think your 9mm is a pea shooter.


Congratulations on choosing shooting as your new hobby. You certainly picked the right pistol. The MP is a great gun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,679 Posts
I would recommend getting some training from a professional. He/she could see your mistakes and correct them before you develop bad habits.



At least go with an experienced shooter, so he/she can show you the basics of grip, stance, trigger control, and follow through.



The CCI Blazer 9mm, in the M&P, is about the lowest recoil you are going to experience with that gun.



Get your stance, grip, trigger control, and follow through down with dry-fire practice at home. Practice until you can pull the trigger without the sights moving at all(or very little). When you are comfortable with that, go to the range and do the very same thing with live rounds. Be sure to grip firmly with your support hand; your firing hand should grip tight, but not real firmly. If you grip too firmly with your firing hand, you can't move your trigger finger without disturbing your hand/grip. Grip it high and tight.



You don't need a trigger job on your M&P. It will take time to learn to shoot proficiently. Be patient.



It's hard to show someone how to shoot on the internet. You really need to find an experienced shooter to help you. Don't be scared to ask someone at the range for help. Most firearms people are very willing to show you what they know.



Have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
419 Posts
CET, ALL guns recoil, you cannot fight it much. You have to have a proper grip and stance and get used to it really. Just go with the flow and learn how the gun moves and gets back on target.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
210 Posts
CET, that's an awesome summary of your 1st experience. I'm expecting my M&P 9 this Wednesday.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
Congrats on the first range trip!



In response to your problem of breaking that last bit of trigger resistance, try to make a conscious effort to pull the trigger straight back, not down. Where you eventually want to be is at the point where the trigger pull is only the first two joints on your finger. Your knuckle on your trigger finger should not move at all. You also want to keep the trigger pull as straight as possible (pull the trigger straight back towards the grip).



I'd also hold off on a trigger job. You just got it!
Honestly, a trigger job right now will not help you, what you need is practice! If you want to really work on getting better, slow fire trigger control will help you tremendously. Make sure you're not limp wristing too, that might have been part of the recoil surprise you experienced.



I just got back into shooting again late last year. The community college I was attending had a pretty good sized Administration of Justice department, and one of the classes they offered was Introduction to Firearms. First four weeks were in a classroom going over safety and basics, next 12 were at the range. We started with .38 special revolvers and I have to tell you, they're great to learn on. What our instructor had us do was load one round, but not know where in the cylinder it was. That way when it went off, it would be a surprise (thus allowing you to see if you're flinching/anticipating and to learn to break the trigger cleanly). If the range you shoot at rents handguns, i'd suggest next time to get one, and try this. Work your way up from one round to a full cylinder. Might also check local colleges to see if they offer classes. I learned a lot of the basics that have helped me tremendously and all it cost me was $26 for the class and $50 for the ammo fee, and I got an excuse to go to the range every week!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,507 Posts
Yep recoil is not something that you control it is something you live with. The best way to live with it is proper grip. But you can have the best grip and be the strongest guy in the world and a gun is still going "jump" so just make sore you have a proper grip not a tight grip just a proper grip and practice that trigger pull without disturbing the sights.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
cet,



If you are not familiar with the trigger reset, and exactly how it works, you may want to do some research on it. This may also help keep you on target better, and allow you to make quicker more accurate follow-up shots. As others have already suggested, spend the money on a good defensive pistol class.



Stay safe,

Nick
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Many thanks for all the great replies!




What amazed me was just how much fun it was. You guys always say "bang" but for me, it's a "BOOM"! LOL! (For you Fifth Element fans, a big-badda-boom)



Are snap caps a necessity for dry fire practice? I've just been keeping the magazine out, racking the slide, aiming at a point in the room and practicing trigger pull. Will it damage or prematurely wear the striker if it's not actually hitting something?



My thought was that snap caps enabled dry firing for pistols with mag safeties and also provided the more realistic experience of going through the entire process.



I'm happier without a magazine in place, as it's an extra safety measure for my personal piece of mind. T'would be difficult for a cartridge to jump into battery without a magazine. Still possible with dextrous fingers, but low on the probability sheet.



The videos are great, and I'm happy to keep watching them. We did get a bit of introduction to shooting from one of the guys at the range. I think he was just as psyched to put the first couple of rounds through my M&P.



Sadly, they only offer a CCW course. It's been difficult for me to find any classes other than CCW here in Orlando. Only other option is private instruction at $80 - $125 / hour, and that's beyond our budget.



That class with range time sounded terrific and VERY affordable. Range membership at $30 / month here cost more than the course with the instruction.



Well, I'm happy with our new "hobby" though the primary purpose is having that extra measure of self-defense at home, and perhaps, eventaully, as CCW.



Please keep the responses coming ... and oh, I do have to mention that somewhere along the line, either my first or second target, but I don't know which shot, has the 10 completely gone dead center. I probably couldn't do that again if I wanted, but it was a thrill pulling that sucker back and seeing it gone!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,207 Posts
Cet,

It is not necessary to use snap caps when dry firing, it is just recommended. With the striker breakage problems that people have been having I figure better safe then sorry. If you want, you can simply chamber a snap cap and then drop your mag. For each successive dry fire only pull the slide back far enough to ready the firing pin but not eject the snap cap. This will allow you to practice the same way you have been while not putting wear on the striker.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
524 Posts
The key is.......make friends with guys that seem to know what they are doing at the range.




Seriously, nobody should have to pay for instruction at the informal level. A 3 day course? Sure! But not informal shooting tips. Find someone who shoots well and is somewhat outgoing (shooters LOVE to teach someone who is willing to learn!) and ask for a few pointers. Even more so, watch what they do. Look at their stance, their hand placement, ect.



It is like anything else, not in that practice will make you better, but PERFECT practice will make you better. Goodluck, and me and you are in much the same boat! My MP40 is my first handgun!



Just make sure you never ever become complacent about gun safety and you will have a ball!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
115 Posts
Cet

Here's a suggestion.. check out some of the local Gun clubs for IDPA or USPSA shooting clubs.. go visit one or more or contact them via email, ask around i'm sure you can find a few knowledgeable folks to give you the basics. Check the NRA also for pistol instructors in the Orlando area.



http://www.idpa.com

http://www.uspsa.org

http://www.nra.org



Nothing quite like the first trip to the range
it's a heady experience.



Yes the loads that competition shooters use in a lot of cases are customized to the shooter preference and weapon, and the weapons themselves are modified in some cases to assist with recoil management, but it's still the shooter that really makes the difference. Please also keep in mind cet that some of those competition shooters you've seen literally put "thousands" of rounds down range yearly.. Some practice sessions for serious competition shooters maybe 500 to a thousand rounds..




Take your time learn the basics and welcome to the sport. Be safe above all else..



Good luck.



Jeff.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
154 Posts
cet,



lots of good advice has been offered already. Most important I would say is to find someone to help show you - in person - the fundementals. In the end, most of what you're seeking in terms of better recoil control will be found in your stance, balance, and grip of the pistol. The blazer ammo is about as easy as it gets for 9MM- this is what I shot at the Nationals this year. Once you learn the basics I would say do lots of disciplined dry fire training. It's cheap and it makes all the difference in the world with your gun handling skills. Others have already suggested looking for a USPSA or IDPA club - that's good advice. Shooting at either one of these events will shorten the learning curve significantly.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top