MP-Pistol Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Can anyone educate me about this type of ammo? I am noticing it around alot lately. have never shot it. Is it for target, or self defense, hunting?. Does it work, and what are it's benefits or drawbacks? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,396 Posts
Frangible ("frang") ammunition is designed primarily for the purpose of shooting steel or other reactive targets at close ranges, and for shooting against backstops which cannot handle a steady barrage of high-velocity lead projectiles. It's also used in many shoot-house training simulators because you don't need armor-rated steel to stop the projectiles and the projectiles don't cause as much wear & tear to the structure.



Frang bullets are generally made of compressed metallic powder which seems solid enough, but when it strikes a hard surface it pulverizes itself. This prevents it from penetrating or ricocheting.



Most frang ammo is also lead-free, and so it is sometimes used when environmental requirements won't allow any kind of lead contamination.



However, most frang ammo is lighter than standard bullet weights for a given caliber. This has two (potentially negative) effects. First, it sometimes doesn't cycle in guns ... some brands of ammo are more prone to cause this problem, and some brands of guns are more prone to experience this problem. Second, the lighter weight and higher velocity means that frang ammo is often much more capable of penetrating body armor ... I've seen many demos of 357 SIG frang ammo going through both the front and back panels of body armor that would easily stop a full-power 125gr Gold Dot.



Frang ammo also tends to be substantially more expensive than jacketed or plated lead.



There is something cool about shooting steel targets at point blank range, though, and that's something you cannot safely do unless you're using frangible ammo.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,396 Posts
While there may be exceptional situations, in general a frangible round is unlikely to do anything more than act like a FMJ in human tissue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
ToddG said:
While there may be exceptional situations, in general a frangible round is unlikely to do anything more than act like a FMJ in human tissue.


He may be thinking of rounds like the Glasers, which are intended for defensive applications.



The consensus among people "in the know" is that fragmenting handgun rounds do not penetrate sufficiently to reliably disrupt vital structures (organs, major blood vessels) and are therefore a poor choice to use to protect yourself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,507 Posts
There is a place up here in PA that makes "Frange" bullets called Sinterfire. I have shot a match or two with some of their guys. They do make hollow point rounds that are intended for defensive purposes. They tell me they can make a bullet penetrate as far or as little as they want based on how much pressure they use during the mfg process.



I have shot some of their defense rounds and it is kind of interesting the front of the bullet just totally fragments and the rear portion stays in one piece so you get the quick energy transfer and supposedly the penetration you need.



I just really doubt the real world practicality as their bullets tend to be very light and light bullets just don't tend to penetrate well. Maybe they really do have the magic bullet they claim to but I am not going to bet my life on it.



You can check them out here:

www.sinterfire.com



Todd, it is super cool to be able to shoot at point blank ranges but I could't stop flinching it scared the crap out of me everytime I pulled the trigger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
BateleurRGB said:
[quote name='ToddG']While there may be exceptional situations, in general a frangible round is unlikely to do anything more than act like a FMJ in human tissue.


He may be thinking of rounds like the Glasers, which are intended for defensive applications.



The consensus among people "in the know" is that fragmenting handgun rounds do not penetrate sufficiently to reliably disrupt vital structures (organs, major blood vessels) and are therefore a poor choice to use to protect yourself.[/quote]



I would tend to agree, but if you live in a house with kids or apartment building, a compromise must be had to avoid over-penetration and collateral damage (like your family).



I personally load all my home defense guns with the first 2 rounds Glaser blues (will break up in sheet rock and "dump" all their energy on impact) This (and the Extreme Shock that the Air Marshal's use to prevent over-penetration in an airplane hull. If I can't stop a bad-guy with the first double-tap of Glasers, I have 7+ (depending on the platform) of Hornady's TAP 230 grains waiting for them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,062 Posts
They're not a great choice for self-defense round due to the very design that they market as being desirable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
150 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Appreciate all the input fellas. I never was a user or fan of glaser ammo, and do not load it in my carry guns. The frangible ammo was something i have been seeing on the shelves lately, and was wondering what it's application was. Thanks to Todd, Dan and Chooch, for once again sharing their expertise and saving me numerous trips around the net. Wow, point blank steel shooting, i think i would flinch right out of my shorts. I do believe as we move towards being a more "green" society and sport, we will be seeing this ammo potentially becoming mandatory at ranges in the future. The long term effects of lead and cadmium etc, and the costs involved with cleaning up and protecting shooters from over exposure to these hazards, may well be closer than we think. Your thoughts :?:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,396 Posts
There are already quite a few ranges which are mandated as lead-free, especially LE & mil training facilities. They often allow non-frang ammo as long as it uses a completely enclosed bullet and lead-free primers. These so-called "reduced lead" rounds are much less expensive than frangible but still provide most of the same environmental/health protections.



Frangible is also sometimes mandated either because the backstop/walls of the shooting facility require it, or because the folks running the range don't understand the difference between "reduced lead" and "frangible."
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top