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Discussion Starter #1
This is what I'm buying. It's made by UnderArmour. It absorbs sweat and keep you really warm, however it is said that UnderArmour products melt in radiant heat or fire. And the last thing I wanna do it scar my face. Any thoughts or experiences?









Here is the warning as stated-

Do not wear Under Armour® when exposed to extreme radiant heat or open flames. Under Armour® products may melt in extreme heat that exceeds 350°F. Never use Under Armour® products as a substitute for flame-retardant or ballistic protective equipment.


So bottom line is would this be any use with guns or would the heat from muzzle flash or spent brass mess up my face?
 

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You will be fine.



UA and other similar fabrics melt instead of burn like a cotton does. Thus, if you work in an area with the potential for flash fires or open flames (turret gunner in iraq, IED's) its not wise to wear their stuff. Thats all.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, was wondering why the Marines banned it a while back.
 
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Discussion Starter #6
choochboost said:
Eddo, do you find yourself "exposed to extreme radiant heat or open flames" when you go to the range?


Apart from muzzle flash and shell casings, nope.



What conditions does it become 350F? Burning building or near campfire?
 

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Eddo36 said:
[quote name='choochboost']Eddo, do you find yourself "exposed to extreme radiant heat or open flames" when you go to the range?


Apart from muzzle flash and shell casings, nope.



What conditions does it become 350F? Burning building or near campfire?[/quote]





Shell casings wouldn't make the cut. Muzzle flash might, but at the range it would, i'd be more cocerned at the bullet that just smashed through your face. Maybe my priorities are out of whack.





Real world every-day activity I would not wear it for would be welding, and posisbly metal grinding. Dunno if ti would melt to your face, but you'd flush your $40 or whatever it cost down the pooper in short order.
 

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Look,



If exposed to sparks or small flames you will get small melted sections that look like nicks.



The issue with UA is it melts (at a relatively low temp) instead of burns, so it is extremely difficult to remove from your skin post trauma. This is the reason a lot of armor crews are wearing nomex flight suits instead of ACU's (ACU material is nylon and melts, instead of burns). An IED that produces a large fire ball (think drums filled with diesel and a small bit of UXO for ignition) if the blast's concussion doesn't kill you, there would be very little shrapnel. Your burns would be very hard to treat if you were wearing UA compared to say regular cotton. You would be fine except for the portions of you left exposed if you were wearing nomex.



Make sense?



In aviation we are not allowed to wear UA if we are on the flight line or in the aircraft during flight, because of the hazard of a flash fire (from fumes)



For your applications, you are fine.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for all the advice, I really appreciate. Just wondering, if you were a SWAT team member, and you have to wear a balaclava, would you trust an UnderArmour balaclava?
 

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No, nomex. That given I don't really see a tactical advantage to a balaclava unless there is a hazard of a flash fire (meth lab, potential boobie traps, ect) or you just wanna look all high speed low drag.



Are you using this to look cool, or because your cold on the range?
 
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ClosetCaseNerd said:
No, nomex. That given I don't really see a tactical advantage to a balaclava unless there is a hazard of a flash fire (meth lab, potential boobie traps, ect) or you just wanna look all high speed low drag.



Are you using this to look cool, or because your cold on the range?


Honestly, I only want it if it's tactically authentic and won't cause hazard in situations like theoretical door breaching situation (though I probably will never be part of it as I'm long out of the military), I'm not looking to buy a halloween costume. I do collect these tactical stuff, but only if an experienced SWAT officer/military have no problem using it if they absolutely have to wear that balaclava for a theoretical reason (ie: regulation, conceal face) during an operation, and would trust it. I plan on having double uses for it- I want it for head protection in paintball as well in the places the mask doesn't cover, I want it for snow protection when I go skiing or snowboarding, or when it's just plain cold. And especially in the range, I want it to protect my face from flying shell casings. I know that Nomax would probably be better, but this mask is cheaper at only $20 rather than $70 nomax. But if this UnderArmour balaclava can work without the risk melting in the range, and it's better than nothing, I would be glad to use it. So thanks for the advices, I'm most likely gonna get it.



choochboost said:
If someone walked into my range/store wearing one, there could be trouble.
I plan on putting it on AFTER walking in the range, as in the same time I put on eye and ears. Though there is no law against wearing a mask for a legitimate purpose. Or even for no purpose at all. Unless only if you commit a crime at the same time, which then makes wearing a mask a seperate count of felony.
 

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Man, I hope you can shoot...and GOOD. Prepare to be laughed at, but if you keep the groups fist sized while doing hammers at a dead sprint, well it SHOULD die down to muffled snickering.
 
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Discussion Starter #16
So I'll get laughed at just for keeping my face protected from hot brass?
 

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Dude, c'mon. What exactly are you worried about? First, how often does that happen? For most of us it's once in a blue moon if at all. Second, it bounces right off and will not burn you unless it gets caught between your face and your glasses. In that case, get some better fitting glasses and wear a ball cap. It's not going to catch your face on fire.



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Discussion Starter #18
I have seen burn scars from pals when they got hot shells lodged into their skin.
 

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Are you sure? Just because you haven't seen firsthand?



http://ip.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/6/4/268



For unintentional injuries, the most common mechanism was gun recoil (43.2%; 11 686 injuries), followed by cutting, piercing, crushing, and pinching injuries associated with the slide or trigger mechanism or other gun part. Six per cent of unintentional injuries resulted from mechanical force related to an explosion of gun parts. Other unintentional injuries included powder burns, burns from contact with hot shell casings, auditory trauma from excessive noise exposure, and falls while carrying a firearm.



Over the four year study period, 6871 persons with recreational non-GSWs were treated in hospital emergency departments in the United States (table 4). Persons treated for these injuries were primarily male and over 15 years of age. Nearly two thirds of the injuries were to the head, face, neck and eye, and most of the others were to the extremities. Rifles and shotguns accounted for nearly two thirds of these injuries. Recreational non-GSWs were primarily associated with hunting (55.2%; 3792 injuries) and target shooting (44.3%; 3043 injuries). Almost half of the recreational injuries (3209 injuries) were caused by gun recoil, and nearly eight out of 10 occurred during the fall and winter.


Also as stated on site, the burning shell factor is just one of the many hazards of unintentional firearm injuries that can be protected by a balaclava.
 
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