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Does Blue-Wonder do any good or is CLP better? I was trying to use a q-tip to get into some of those hard to reach places. It takes me about an hour to do a complete cleaning, though I think I'm a little slow. What do you use in your cleaning kits and how long does it take you to do you do it? Do you clean/oil the magazines too?
 

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My standard cleaning procedure for all my autoloaders:

1. Remove any magazine, lock-back slide, verify weapon is unloaded. Put on nitrile rubber gloves.

2. Field strip slide from frame, remove barrel and recoil spring from slide, disassemble magazines.

3. Using a gun cleaning nylon brush generously dipped in Hoppe's #9, scrub brush all interior/exterior surfaces of slide, barrel, recoil spring, magazines, and last but not least, the interior of the pistol's frame.

4. Using an appropriately sized bronze bore brush generously dipped in Hoppe's #9, brush the bore of the barrel its full length approx. 2 dozen times or so.

5. Apply Breakfree foaming bore cleaner (or equiv.) to inside of barrel bore and chamber. Let sit 20 minutes, min.

6. Again using an appropriately sized bronze bore brush generously dipped in Hoppe's #9, brush the bore of the barrel another 2 dozen times or so.

7. Clean wash every part initially cleaned with Hoppe's #9 using Breakfree Powder Blast or equiv. cleaner/degreaser. You will be amazed at the amount of crud and carbon that will pour out of your gun! It will be as dry as a desert rock after that, but it will be sparkly clean and ready for lube.

8. Put several drops of Breakfree CLP on several appropriately sized bore patches and jag them through the barrel bore, from the chamber end of the barrel, of course. They should come out completely clean after several patches are pushed through.

9. Using a patch or lint-free shop towel with several drops of CLP on it, put an ultra thin surface coat of CLP on all interior/exterior metal surfaces, being certain to keep any oil out of the firing pin channel.

10. Put single drops of CLP on the recommended high wear points per manufacturer, reassemble weapon and magazines.



Done.



Usually takes 30 minutes per weapon, including the 20 minute wait. Let the chemicals do the elbow work for you.
 
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, so you don't experience much double-feed/stove-pipe jams? I do every 200 rounds or so, and am starting to change my cleaning tactics. Would Blue Wonder work as well?
 

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I don't have any experience with..

Blue Wonder products.



I've used Breakfree CLP for years as my standard lube, as I've found nothing better for the CLP functions that it performs. It has been shown to be one of the best, if not the best corrosion inhibiting firearm lubricant on the market.



Hoppe's #9 still is tops in the non/low-ammonia powder solvent category, in my opinion. Breakfree foaming bore cleaner dissolves copper fouling like no tommorow. And Breakfree powder blast is safe on polymer firearms and has a pleasing citrus scent (not recommended for use as Screwdriver mix, though).



While other products might be comparable to the above, I like sticking with what I know works for me.



If it ain't broke...
 

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Disassemble, clean barrel with Ed's Red/CLP.



Shoot the rest of the gun with solvent in a spray bottle, blast out with compressed air. Wipe down, lubricate, reassemble.



5-minutes. I only clean every 1,000 rounds or so.
 

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I use a Hoppes kit for my 9. In addition to the kit, I use Q-Tips and pipe cleaners for tight areas. The pipe cleaners come from a tobacco store and are made of cotton as opposed to the nylon ones available at craft stores. The cotton ones hold solvent better. They are great for getting into tight places like under the rails. I also use a toothbrush for cleaning areas like the slide and breach. I use old clean t-shirts for general wipe down and drying of parts. It takes me about 30-40 minutes to do a cleaning. As for lubrication I follow the instructions in the owners manual.

I have done a bit of research on this and ended up putting together an instruction sheet. When I have finished formatting it, I will make it available to anyone who wants it.
 

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All my guns get CLP and Remington's teflon lube on selected parts. I also use Bore Cleen's ( CleenBore?? can't remember) copper-out bore foam on my AR. I have a 16 year old Glock that has been cleaned exclusively this way, and aside from some holster wear, looks new.
 

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I use a Hoppes kit for my 9. In addition to the kit, I use Q-Tips and pipe cleaners for tight areas. The pipe cleaners come from a tobacco store and are made of cotton as opposed to the nylon ones available at craft stores. The cotton ones hold solvent better. They are great for getting into tight places like under the rails. I also use a toothbrush for cleaning areas like the slide and breach. I use old clean t-shirts for general wipe down and drying of parts. It takes me about 30-40 minutes to do a cleaning. As for lubrication I follow the instructions in the owners manual.

I have done a bit of research on this and ended up putting together an instruction sheet. When I have finished formatting it, I will make it available to anyone who wants it.


That sounds great. I just got my M&P 9 and have not had the chance to even fire it yet.
 

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Okay, here's a dumb newb question about using a bore brush.



I know you're supposed to shove the brush in from the chamber end of the barrel, not the muzzle, to avoid damaging the muzzle crown.



But it occurs to me that once you've shoved the brush all the way through and out into thin air, pulling it back through the barrel is not any different from inserting it from the muzzle end in the first place.



So...when you're scrubbing the barrel with the brush, are you supposed to avoid shoving it clear of the other end or not?
 

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Okay, here's a dumb newb question about using a bore brush.



I know you're supposed to shove the brush in from the chamber end of the barrel, not the muzzle, to avoid damaging the muzzle crown.



But it occurs to me that once you've shoved the brush all the way through and out into thin air, pulling it back through the barrel is not any different from inserting it from the muzzle end in the first place.



So...when you're scrubbing the barrel with the brush, are you supposed to avoid shoving it clear of the other end or not?
You have to pass it all the way through the barrel before pulling it back through. Have you ever tried to pull it back before it has exited the other end? It doesn't work.

Pulling it back through is much safer for the crown than inserting from the muzzle end because the rod will not be making contact with the crown. Just be careful when you do it.
 

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You have to pass it all the way through the barrel before pulling it back through. Have you ever tried to pull it back before it has exited the other end? It doesn't work.

Pulling it back through is much safer for the crown than inserting from the muzzle end because the rod will not be making contact with the crown. Just be careful when you do it.




Just to add to what harrydog said -

The reason why you don't reverse the cleaning brush in the middle is that when the brush goes thru the barrel the bristles will be bent backwards. If you reverse course then the bristles have to straighten up and then bend the other way. It is usually damaging to either the brush and/or the barrel when that happens.
 

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Have you ever tried to pull it back before it has exited the other end? It doesn't work.


Actually, yeah... on a different gun. I just got done cleaning my .22 target rifle. I could pull the brush back through the barrel without first shoving it out the muzzle with no real problem.
 

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Actually, yeah... on a different gun. I just got done cleaning my .22 target rifle. I could pull the brush back through the barrel without first shoving it out the muzzle with no real problem.


Well, I probably shouldn't have said that "it doesn't work" but rather that it is difficult enough that it should be obvious that you shouldn't do it. On a .22 I have a feeling that the brush bristles are so short that reversing the direction within the barrel is much easier than with a larger bore.

Just curious though, why would you want to do it that way?
 

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Just curious though, why would you want to do it that way?


See my question above....you're supposed to put the rod and brush in from the chamber end to avoid damaging the muzzle crown, right?



So what I was wondering is, could pulling the brush back into the barrel once you've shoved it all the way out the muzzle potentially cause the same kind of damage?
 

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Standard takedown - 2 Rem Wipes ( 1 as general cleaning rag - 1 as a lube rag when cleaning is done )



Re-assemble - gaze at with love.



I also use a .45 brush for inside of barrel with the cleaning wipe around it.



Done in 5 mins.



Fred
 

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I don't think that cleaning the inside of the frame is too important as a routine. I would add that one way to mess up a Glock or M&P is to allow powder or metal particles and/or oil to accumulate in the striker channel. I have found that, no matter how lightly I oil the various parts, unwelcome stuff collects in the channel and can cause failures to fire.



I check the striker channel every 200 rounds or so and swab it out with Q-Tips.



BTW, you should never lube the striker or channel.
 

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1. Remove any magazine, lock-back slide, verify weapon is unloaded. Put on nitrile rubber gloves.

2. Field strip slide from frame, remove barrel and recoil spring from slide, disassemble magazines.

3. Using a gun cleaning nylon brush generously dipped in Hoppe's #9, scrub brush all interior/exterior surfaces of slide, barrel, recoil spring, magazines, and last but not least, the interior of the pistol's frame.

4. Using an appropriately sized bronze bore brush generously dipped in Hoppe's #9, brush the bore of the barrel its full length approx. 2 dozen times or so.

5. Apply Breakfree foaming bore cleaner (or equiv.) to inside of barrel bore and chamber. Let sit 20 minutes, min.

6. Again using an appropriately sized bronze bore brush generously dipped in Hoppe's #9, brush the bore of the barrel another 2 dozen times or so.

7. Clean wash every part initially cleaned with Hoppe's #9 using Breakfree Powder Blast or equiv. cleaner/degreaser. You will be amazed at the amount of crud and carbon that will pour out of your gun! It will be as dry as a desert rock after that, but it will be sparkly clean and ready for lube.

8. Put several drops of Breakfree CLP on several appropriately sized bore patches and jag them through the barrel bore, from the chamber end of the barrel, of course. They should come out completely clean after several patches are pushed through.

9. Using a patch or lint-free shop towel with several drops of CLP on it, put an ultra thin surface coat of CLP on all interior/exterior metal surfaces, being certain to keep any oil out of the firing pin channel.

10. Put single drops of CLP on the recommended high wear points per manufacturer, reassemble weapon and magazines.



Done.



Usually takes 30 minutes per weapon, including the 20 minute wait. Let the chemicals do the elbow work for you.


10. Put single drops of CLP on the recommended high wear points per manufacturer, reassemble weapon and magazines.

what are the high wear points? thanks
 
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