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Discussion Starter #1
Just received my new Fist #7 (Drop Front Basic) for a 9c.

Instructions say to push the pistol in and out to loosen the fit.I've done this perhaps 75 times so far.

This has helped a lot compared to yesterday's fit but it is still too tight for a reasonable draw.

Any suggestions to speed up the process ??

Thanks
 

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Wrap the pistol in a baggy or two and leave it in the holster overnight.



From Milt Sparks Holsters:

My holster is too tight! What's the best way to break it in?



Tightness in a new holster is not uncommon and is much preferable to the alternative. If the draw is a little stiff at first, it is recommended that you work with it to see if it doesn't loosen up with a bit of use. About 25 to 50 presentations should be a good indicator of whether the holster will break in sufficiently on its own or if maybe a little blocking out of the leather is in order. There are many variables as to why a holster would be excessively tight ranging from the texture of your guns finish, to slight changes in climate or humidity from where the holster is made. Regardless of the reason, a too tight holster can easily be remedied by the end user with a method we have been recommending to customers for over 20 years.



To block out (stretch) your new holster first UNLOAD your pistol or revolver and place the gun into the 4 mil plastic bag that your new holster was packaged in. Then carefully insert the bagged gun all the way into the holster (do not! I repeat, do not!! wet or spray the holster with any solution to aid in the stretching process). The blocking out process as described above will in no way harm the crisp detailed molding of your new holster, nor will it ruin its retention qualities. It serves simply to stretch the leather a few thousands of an inch larger than the gun. The amount of stretching time needed for satisfactory results range from a just a few minutes to overnight.
 

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Desantis recommends using a dress sock vs. a plastic bag. Worked for me. Guess you could use a heavier white gym sock if you wanted a little more space, but go slow, you don't want to overstrretch it.



They also caution against using any spray or liquid.
 

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Galco said:
Galco leather holsters are… precision molded to specific firearms. It may appear the holster fit is too tight at first, but this is by design. We engineer our holsters to fit tightly knowing the leather fibers will relax to the proper fit with use…



…If the fit is too tight when holstering your firearm the first time don’t force it. If you do force it, it may be difficult to remove the firearm. Spend a few minutes preparing the leather pocket. (Similar to a new baseball glove or pair of leather shoes, it needs to be broken in. However, the break-in techniques are different.) Using your hands only - no tools, no oils, no chemicals, etc. - relax the seamed edges by gently flexing the holster in all directions repeatedly. This does not mean severely folding, bending or smashing the leather. Once the body of the holster starts to feel less rigid, it is time to insert and remove your completely unloaded firearm from the holster multiple times to create the perfect, long-term fit.



After using the above break-in techniques, if your holster is too tight for your preference, you may want to try Galco Draw-EZ. It is applied to the inside of your leather holster to shorten the break-in period and to provide a slicker draw.


High Noon Holsters said:
We build our holsters for a snug fit. It may appear the holster fit is too tight at first but this is by design. Tightness in a new holster is not uncommon and is much preferable to the alternative. If the draw is a little stiff at first, it is recommended that you work with it to see if it doesn't loosen up with a bit of use. About 25 to 35 draws should be a good indicator of whether the holster will break in on its own.



There are many reasons as to why a holster would be excessively tight ranging from the texture of your guns finish, minute variations in the hand stitching process, to slight changes in climate or humidity from where the holster is made. Regardless of the reason, a too tight holster can easily be remedied by the end user. Generally leather will stretch slightly with use. A break-in period may be needed, similar to a new pair of leather shoes.


Kramer Leather said:
we prefer to have our holsters start out on the snug fitting side. Should it be necessary to loosen your holster, take the plastic bag that the holster cam in and wrap it around the gun. Insert the UNLOADED gun into the holster and let it set for several hours. This will stretch the leather approximately two or three thousandths of an inch. If necessary, wrap the gun with two bags. You can use up to three bags to stretch the holster. If this is still not successful, give us a call and we will be happy to adjust the fit for you.
 

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I'm not familiar with the holster you mention. Leather?



Two suggestions for leather:

1. Take a piece of wax paper and "polish" the inside of the holster with it. This has worked very well for me with several holsters.



2. I've heard of spraying the inside of the holster with silicone but never needed to try it myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi;

I've now done plastic bag,wax paper and sock.

Holster is MUCH looser so my draw now lifts the holster (and the belt) a lot less.(With belt pretty tight on my waist)

Holster still retains pistol when turned upside down.

**My question is how loose should it be?

I don't want to over stretch it.

I'm used to kydex but I know leather wont ever be that slippery.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's not specifically a holster belt but it is pretty stiff and 1 1/2 inches wide.

I'll try another belt same width but MUCH thicker leather.
 

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A good belt makes all the difference

I have to dress in a professional manner at work and have been sporting one of these (1.5 inch) for the past several months. Nobody knows it’s a gun belt. It looks nice yet is very stiff as a gun belt should be.



You would be hard-pressed to find a better gun belt at any price. The Beltman really knows his stuff.
 

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I've got a FIST #8 (owb) and a UBG Canute (iwb) and an actual gun belt made all the difference in carrying and drawing. If you're using a thinner belt with a leather holster that doesn't have a reinforced mouth, and cinching it tighter, it's pulling the holster tighter around the pistol and binding it a little when you draw. With the gun belt, I can wear the belt at the proper tension and not worry about pulling the gun and the holster up around my armpit. Also, I know it's common sense, but I don't miss any belt loops on my pants.



Since my belt is getting pretty old, I've also been looking at Beltman (rondo provided the link in his post). Christmas is coming!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Final Break-in Report

Using a sock over the pistol to stretch the holster and "polishing" the inside with wax paper(doesn't get the leather wet or soft) did the trick.

I'll still get a heavier belt though.
 

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A good belt on your hips, tightened well (overly tight is not necessary), plenty of "working" the leather by holstering & drawing as well as rolling the leather in your hands, and your holster should break in nicely. It took my Galco Summer Comfort quite a while for my P220ST to break it in, but now it's a very solid ride and doesn't try to jump into my armpit on the draw either




A belt specifically for carrying is definitely far better than even solid belts not reserved specifically for carrying.
 
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