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It seems you have your answer to your question, yes you can add one. However, IF you need to have one added have a gunsmith do it, your wife is worth the extra cash, don't bother trying to do it yourself.

FWIW here's my experience with the 380EZ:

Brand new shooter in Dec, 2020. My very first pistol was the 380EZ, I did get the thumb safety. I didn't even know it was an optional item when I bought it. It was used and was the only one they had at the time. I don't regret getting the safety, it did give me an extra sense of security carrying with one in the chamber.

I started carrying it daily after I got a good holster. Yes get a good holster immediately for her, covers trigger completely, good retention etc.

I took two shooting classes with that and during all that training I did NOT forget to drop the safety once. That was two 3.5hr classes (7hrs) with 300 rounds fired. When I switch between it and my G19 (no thumb safety) it takes a few practice draws to regain the drawing and disengaging back into memory.

Training is key, training to draw and holster safely, draw and fire and manipulate the safety can all be learned with or without the thumb safety.

The gun is perfectly fine without the thumb safety, and I would say have her try it without it. The grip safety is good and if you don't have a good grip it won't fire. Have her train with dummy rounds and work on drawing and holstering etc. Attend a training classes (plural!) with it.
 

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I just purchased a 380 ez fo my wife today, and realized after I got it home that I got the one without the thumb Safety. This is her first ever pistol, and I would be more comfortable if it has the safety . Is there a way to add one?


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You know your wife so do whats in your better judgement, my girl is 68 and her first firearm and shes comfortable with the grip safety - She also had 3 firearm safety classes and range time with me , I trust her 100% -classes with Girl on Girl class was a major improvement
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·

Now that i know i can add one, ill let her choose after she gets some range time and training under her belt. I cant wait to see if she likes it


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(SNIP)
I took two shooting classes with that and during all that training I did NOT forget to drop the safety once. That was two 3.5hr classes (7hrs) with 300 rounds fired. When I switch between it and my G19 (no thumb safety) it takes a few practice draws to regain the drawing and disengaging back into memory.

Training is key, training to draw and holster safely, draw and fire and manipulate the safety can all be learned with or without the thumb safety.

The gun is perfectly fine without the thumb safety, and I would say have her try it without it. The grip safety is good and if you don't have a good grip it won't fire. Have her train with dummy rounds and work on drawing and holstering etc. Attend a training classes (plural!) with it.
We are just debating this, so don't take it personally, but there is a big difference between remembering to disengage a manual safety during training and remembering when you are surprised, under extreme stress, in a hurry, and thinking someone is going to shoot back.

How about if someone has their hands on you, and you need to clear the holster and get a shot off immediately? Same as carrying with an empty chamber. It's not ready to fire. You can never know if you will have any amount of time to draw and fire. You don't need additional things to do if that ever happens.

Honestly, I can't see a need for a manual safety. Keeping your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot should be adequate.

I'm just big on keeping it real simple I guess.
 

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Get her use to a firearm without the safety. Since this has a grip safety, that should be good enough. If used in a self defense situation where time is everything, you'll be glad you didn't have that thumb safety. I have many automatic pistols and the only ones with a thumb safety are my 1911s. All the Tupperware autos are thumb safety free.
 

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We are just debating this, so don't take it personally, but there is a big difference between remembering to disengage a manual safety during training and remembering when you are surprised, under extreme stress, in a hurry, and thinking someone is going to shoot back.

How about if someone has their hands on you, and you need to clear the holster and get a shot off immediately? Same as carrying with an empty chamber. It's not ready to fire. You can never know if you will have any amount of time to draw and fire. You don't need additional things to do if that ever happens.

Honestly, I can't see a need for a manual safety. Keeping your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot should be adequate.

I'm just big on keeping it real simple I guess.
^^^ This ^^^ Saw a vid on You Tube some time ago of a real time robbery of a jewelry store. The store owner pulls a 1911, has the drop on the bad guys. You can see him trying to fire the weapon. In the heat of the moment, he forgot to release the thumb safety. That gave Mr. Bad Guy the edge he needed to shoot the owner dead. Training is fine, the more the better, but the cold hard fact is, you don't know how you'll react when the excrement gets real. I won't debate those of you who run with external safeties, by all means, rock on. Me? If it comes down to it, all I want to remember is to squeeze the trigger.
 

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^^^ This ^^^ Saw a vid on You Tube some time ago of a real time robbery of a jewelry store. The store owner pulls a 1911, has the drop on the bad guys. You can see him trying to fire the weapon. In the heat of the moment, he forgot to release the thumb safety. That gave Mr. Bad Guy the edge he needed to shoot the owner dead. Training is fine, the more the better, but the cold hard fact is, you don't know how you'll react when the excrement gets real. I won't debate those of you who run with external safeties, by all means, rock on. Me? If it comes down to it, all I want to remember is to squeeze the trigger.
I saw that as well.

Kinda sticks with you...
 

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I was an Army MP, 1970 - 1972. The 1911A1 was my primary weapon. Later I retired from local law enforcement when revolvers were the norm. I carried a Colt Commander in .45 ACP when in plain clothes and off duty. I trained with these weapons extensively and I never had a problem with transitioning from revolver to 1911 with a thumb safety. I usually carried in the 1 o’clock position down the front of my pants and I was thankful for that thumb safety.

Things have changed significantly since those days. Now I read and see YouTube videos of people very much against thumb safeties, without explaining why. I have read this thread and wonder about all this hypothetical scenarios. The story about the guy being robbed, having the drop on the criminal and not knowing how to disengage the thumb safety shows that he had a dangerous lack of training.

My point is, no matter what you arm yourself with, you need training and significant range time practicing with that firearm. There is a lot more to possession and carry of a firearm than just buying one and bringing it home. Remember, “ How do you get to Carnegie Hall? PRACTICE. “ It is the same if you want to arm yourself. PRACTICE. What Rodney_Roberts does with the M&P EZ is none of my business. He asked a question and wanted help. I responded to that NOT whether it was a good idea. That is for him to decide.
 

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Thank you for your service - both military and law enforcement.

As a professional in law enforcement you are prepared to deal with life-and-death situations, and have the obligation and opportunity to train extensively. Most civilians do not.

Civilians are not trained to enter dangerous situations - they find us - typically unexpectedly.

I'm proficient with my firearms, and a Master-class pistol competitor, but that's not the same as being trained on how to react and deal with a deadly threat. I'm most likely going to be startled, scared, nervous, and full of adrenaline if I think I need to defend myself with deadly force. It's not something I typically deal with frequently or am trained for.

I'm assuming most of us will be the same, including the OP's wife.

That's why I keep it real simple.
 

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We are just debating this, so don't take it personally, but there is a big difference between remembering to disengage a manual safety during training and remembering when you are surprised, under extreme stress, in a hurry, and thinking someone is going to shoot back.

How about if someone has their hands on you, and you need to clear the holster and get a shot off immediately? Same as carrying with an empty chamber. It's not ready to fire. You can never know if you will have any amount of time to draw and fire. You don't need additional things to do if that ever happens.

Honestly, I can't see a need for a manual safety. Keeping your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot should be adequate.

I'm just big on keeping it real simple I guess.
None taken, I think the overall message is that whether you have a manual safety or not, trigger discipline and training are the most important thing.
 

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Hi Guys,
I just joined this forum tonight, so I don’t mean to barge in, but this topic is of interest to me because I want to add an external safety to my M&P 2.0 and C.O.R.E. The reasons are as follows:
1. I cut my teeth on 1911s, so the safety has been trained into me. But interestingly, my duty weapon is a HK USP without an external safety, so the points made above are definitely valid. My current duty training doesn’t include an external safety, so I have to make sure that I train with it for my concealed carry pistols (1911 and Browning Hi Power).
2. When duck hunting with a shotgun, or training with an AR-15, the external safety is part of the program. I’m not sure how that’s any different than a pistol safety. As many have said, training is key.
3. When holstering a 1911, it’s comforting to be able to confirm that the safety is on. Another benefit is being able to block the hammer with your thumb as you put the pistol in the holster, which is obviously not possible with a striker fired pistol, but knowing that the eternal safety is engaged helps mitigate the danger of a discharge due to shirt material or holster material or God forbid bad trigger finger placement activating the trigger.
4. The external safety can always be activated while holstering, then taken off to be ready for the first shot without having to worry about it when the time comes. The external safeties on S&W pistols don’t seem to take up much room, so the benefits seem to outweigh any negatives.
5. Sorry for such a long post by a newbie! My next post will be asking what parts are needed to add external safeties to my pistols.
Cheers!
 

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Hi Guys,
I just joined this forum tonight, so I don’t mean to barge in, but this topic is of interest to me because I want to add an external safety to my M&P 2.0 and C.O.R.E. The reasons are as follows:
…..
…..
…..
My next post will be asking what parts are needed to add external safeties to my pistols.
Cheers!
The parts for the M&P 2.0 are:
Manual Safety Code: 3001832
Safety Detent Code: 391430000
Safety Detent Spring Code: 391640000
These are listed at Midwest Gun Works.
 

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(SNIP)
4. The external safety can always be activated while holstering, then taken off to be ready for the first shot without having to worry about it when the time comes. The external safeties on S&W pistols don’t seem to take up much room, so the benefits seem to outweigh any negatives.
5. Sorry for such a long post by a newbie! My next post will be asking what parts are needed to add external safeties to my pistols.
Cheers!
Welcome, and thank you for your service in law enforcement.

The issue I would have with that procedure (safety on during holstering, then off after in holster) would be if you were to get distracted and not turn it off after it's in the holster. In that case you would draw it and it would not fire. You would then need to determine that the safety was on and needed to be deactivated.

I totally understand the need to a manual safety on a 1911, but to me the current striker-fired pistols operate more like a revolver (no safety) than a 1911. A stock M&P takes quite a bit of movement and effort to release the trigger.
 

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The "old 1911 guys" I know have developed muscle memory to the point where they automatically flick off the safety as they draw -- whether there is a safety or not. It seems to me that this is a good thing since you are not having to remember which platform you are using that day when you have that enormous adrenaline dump that occurs when ... you know.

You shoot the way you train. So, train to always flick off the safety even when there is none. And if you need a manual safety on a striker gun for your own peace of mind - that is what you should have.
 
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The parts for the M&P 2.0 are:
Manual Safety Code: 3001832
Safety Detent Code: 391430000
Safety Detent Spring Code: 391640000
These are listed at Midwest Gun Works.
Thanks for the info! Are Those parts the same for both the 2.0 and the C.O.R.E? My C.O.R.E is not a 2.0.
thanks again!
 

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Thanks for the info! Are Those parts the same for both the 2.0 and the C.O.R.E? My C.O.R.E is not a 2.0.
thanks again!
The Manual Safety is different for original M&P (not the M2.0) They look the same but there a slight difference. The original version has a different code number. MGW has both.
 

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Welcome, and thank you for your service in law enforcement.

The issue I would have with that procedure (safety on during holstering, then off after in holster) would be if you were to get distracted and not turn it off after it's in the holster. In that case you would draw it and it would not fire. You would then need to determine that the safety was on and needed to be deactivated.

I totally understand the need to a manual safety on a 1911, but to me the current striker-fired pistols operate more like a revolver (no safety) than a 1911. A stock M&P takes quite a bit of movement and effort to release the trigger.
The Manual Safety is different for original M&P (not the M2.0) They look the same but there a slight difference. The original version has a different code number. MGW has both.
Thanks a lot!
 

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I went through this debate with my Wife & Youngest Son..
Originally we bought the 380EZ without the safety & sold it off making an extra $100 BTW
Picked the 2nd one up with the safety but only had one magazine for $331
My Son is a South Paw & I just ordered him a nice kydex LH Holster for the 380EZ
It came yesterday & his birthday is Aug. 26th + Found an extra magazine too..

Without Safety M&P Shield 380 EZ
18231


With Safety M&P Shield 380 EZ
18232
 

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My thoughts as well.

Unless you train A LOT to automatically switch the manual safety off as you draw, even an experienced shooter can forget to disengage it under the extreme stress of a personal defense situation.
Agreed about training. But for over a hundred years 1911 owners sort of figured that out before Glock came along. :)
 

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Agreed about training. But for over a hundred years 1911 owners sort of figured that out before Glock came along. :)
True, but there were plenty of incidents over the years when it was a factor - and changed the outcome.
 
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