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Ideas for backstop at home range

8513 Views 23 Replies 15 Participants Last post by  YukonGlocker
Want to build my own backstop on my property. Will be shooting .45/9mm/.223

Was thinking of combination of railroad ties,thick plywood, soil or sand and maybe old tires.

Anybody ever build their own. trying to economical but safe.
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Take some pictures of the property, so we or I have a better idea of what you have. I dream of doing the same thing, but like you I am not sure of the safety requirements.



Backstop

Morgan, got 16 acres have been shootin a lot but a kid in a neighboring town was killed a couple of weeks ago by a stray .22 fired by a guy target shooting on his property(Buda,TX) so Im thinking about making sure I dont have any stray rounds. Was thinking of taking railroad ties and building 2 seperate wall w/wings about a foot apart and 3/4 inch plywood front and back of both walls. then filling the gap w/ soil or sand. Maybe dirt ramp coming of the back of the structure. Im thinking I could just replace the facing plywood once it gets to shot up. probably have no more than 30-40 yards cause of residences a few acres over in different directions.
I used to work at a commercial range, and we used shredded tires as a backstop. VERY effective. Most handgun rounds where stopped in the first 6 inches and rifle rounds only about 1.5 feet.



Not the prettiest thing in the world tho...



--EasyD
Plain old dirt or sand makes an excellent backstop, avoid rocks that could cause ricochets, railroad ties get shot out and penetrated after a while, dirt gets eroded by the gunfire as well as weather.



Best bet is an earthen backstop as high as reasonably possible and at least 5 or 6 feet thick, even then monitor closely for bullet impact erosion and erosion caused by weather.
shredded tires

EasyD said:
I used to work at a commercial range, and we used shredded tires as a backstop. VERY effective. Most handgun rounds where stopped in the first 6 inches and rifle rounds only about 1.5 feet.



Not the prettiest thing in the world tho...



--EasyD
where did you get old shredde tires from?
I am jealous! Cant wait to move to WA so I can build my own Backstop/Range.......Your a lucky man brother!



Let us know how it goes!!
OK, here is what my idea for now. I have room for improvement I know, and I would like you suggestions too.







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Now thats a man with a plan there! Nice layout brother!! Let me know when its all done I will be there for sure, considering you supply the ammo.....lmao



Is this going to be in your backyard? Or some plans for junior? Either or, you layed this out quite nice Morgan!!



Morgan Walker said:
OK, here is what my idea for now. I have room for improvement I know, and I would like you suggestions too.



I would suggest a wall of railroad ties (simply stacked and secured together) in a broad, open C shape with the open end facing your firing position. Then, push dirt up against the back of them into a slope and stack used tires within the C two or three deep and however tall you want, fill them up with dirt or sand as you go. The used tires help to prevent soil erosion and the railroad ties give support and over-penetration protection to the setup. I think that would be the most economical method because having a large enough hill that's self-supporting earth is quite costly and hard to do. - Colt
I thought about large bails of hay, or straw too...



I don't often go to traditional ranges but I remember at scout camp range they had plate steel at a 45 degree angle so bullets would hit and be deflected straight down. You'd have to get something pretty think and hardened if you're going to shoot larger caliber rifles but it's something that wouldn't require moving a lot of work and wouldn't wear down.
One thing to keep in mind; limit the area of the back stop so the lead-contaminated soil can be dug out and disposed of fairly easily. Some day you, or your descendants, may want to sell the land and having to remediate a toxic waste site can be very expensive and/or greatly lower the sale price. Also lead contamination (from primers) can occur at the firing point so protect the soil there too.



With the current high price of lead, you may also want to recover the bullets for their scrap value and limiting the backstop area will make this easier too.
cheaper to shoot the old junk car :wink:
lmao




tigs40cal said:
cheaper to shoot the old junk car :wink:
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You have to remember in Louisiana, old rusted out cars are just lawn ornaments that epitomise the status of us ********... :wink:



Morgan Walker said:
You have to remember in Louisiana, old rusted out cars are just lawn ornaments that epitomise the status of us ********... :wink:


yes but to have one with glass is a plus so you can see how well your defense rounds go thru car windows.i guess you could shoot neighbors junk car ifyours dont have glass :wink:
Just shoot at road signs. That's the way they do in the hills. :wink:
I second that "be careful about lead" thing. Do you have your own well? Make sure that you aren't going to be filtering lead down into your water table. With enough shooting and rainfall lead can contaminate ground water. Just make sure that you can periodically remove your lead.

M2C
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