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I recently bought an M&Pc in Massachusettes. I wasn't terribly fond of the trigger pull so I took it to a local gunsmith, and asked that he lighten it. After the adjustments I noticed something strange, when I pull the trigger and there is no magazine in the well, it feels as if the sear is engaging (I think that's the word, I'm terrible with the trigger nomenclature) but at about 1/3 the normal resistance. It allmost feels like the metal arm that connects the triger to the sear is engaging the top of the slide. (BTW it has the magazine safety) All the gunsmithing he did, took only 10 min, and all I believe he did was change the trigger spring. I called him the next day and when i explained the issue his response was, "so" :?I then called S&W about the issue and they told me that his "work" voided my warranty.
So I've decided to just place the old spring back in. (I kept it just in case) But my question is this, is it possible that the smith incorrectly reassembled the trigger assembly? I mean, I took it shooting afterwards, it functions fine, 100 rounds through, no ftf or fte, nothing. I've decided I'm done with "help" from that smith. I was woundering if I could smooth the trigger pull somehow myself in such a way that the damage would no be permenant? Sorry for the countless typo's.



Thanks for any and all help,

-CrabPirate
 

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10 minuit trigger job

I did a trigger job following the on line instuctions and I can tell you it takes alot longer than 10 min. If he just changed a spring I would hardly call that a trigger job. With his attitude it sounds like you're the one that got jobbed! I hope you didn't spend alot of money. You might want to do us Mass gun owners a favor and let us know the name of this gunsmith so that we don't fall into the same situation. If you are handy for about $50 you can order a sear block, trigger bar and trigger spring from Brownells and drop those parts in and you'll have a 6.5 lb trigger. Beats the 10 lb for sure.
 

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E-mail Dan...he can cure what ails you gun.
 

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I'd be surprised if Dan can do one in much less than a half hour. To get it really good.. you need to do some trial and error with the sear. If you have a MA trigger a replacement sear assembly is the minimum required and that alone is about $30.



Take it to Dan.
 

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CrabPirate said:
I recently bought an M&Pc in Massachusettes. I wasn't terribly fond of the trigger pull so I took it to a local gunsmith, and asked that he lighten it. After the adjustments I noticed something strange, when I pull the trigger and there is no magazine in the well, it feels as if the sear is engaging (I think that's the word, I'm terrible with the trigger nomenclature) but at about 1/3 the normal resistance. It allmost feels like the metal arm that connects the triger to the sear is engaging the top of the slide. (BTW it has the magazine safety) All the gunsmithing he did, took only 10 min, and all I believe he did was change the trigger spring. I called him the next day and when i explained the issue his response was, "so" :?I then called S&W about the issue and they told me that his "work" voided my warranty. :shock: So I've decided to just place the old spring back in. (I kept it just in case) But my question is this, is it possible that the smith incorrectly reassembled the trigger assembly? I mean, I took it shooting afterwards, it functions fine, 100 rounds through, no ftf or fte, nothing. I've decided I'm done with "help" from that smith. I was woundering if I could smooth the trigger pull somehow myself in such a way that the damage would no be permenant? Sorry for the countless typo's.



Thanks for any and all help,

-CrabPirate


Sure, why not compound your problems and work on it yourself. Send it to Dan and be done with it. It will be done correctly and you wont have to waste anymore time worrying about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well I took her apart and replace the new spring with the old, and put some metal conditioner on the sear, now the guns works fine, just got back from the range and put 200 rounds through her, no ftf fte or anything, just like she was when i got her. The trigger assembly was so amazingly simplistic! I am used to 1911's which give me endless trouble reassembling the triggers. I think I'm all set with gun smiths for awhile, I'll just break this one in, I've had enough help for one life time.
 

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CrabPirate said:
Well I took her apart and replace the new spring with the old, and put some metal conditioner on the sear, now the guns works fine, just got back from the range and put 200 rounds through her, no ftf fte or anything, just like she was when i got her. The trigger assembly was so amazingly simplistic! I am used to 1911's which give me endless trouble reassembling the triggers. I think I'm all set with gun smiths for awhile, I'll just break this one in, I've had enough help for one life time.




I feel exactly the opposite of what you said (in highlights). 1911 triggers are the easiest to reassemble in my opinion. Of course I haven't tried to do this with the M&P. With the 1911s, as long as you follow guides found in books, on the net or in Kuhnhausen's book/s and know the intimate relationship (tolerances, specs) between sear, hammer, disconnector and trigger everything comes together. I will wait a while before I try anything with the M&P. I aim to break it in first to see how it performs for me. I am very hard on pistols and expect much out of them.
 

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effinnewguy said:
[quote name='CrabPirate']Well I took her apart and replace the new spring with the old, and put some metal conditioner on the sear, now the guns works fine, just got back from the range and put 200 rounds through her, no ftf fte or anything, just like she was when i got her. The trigger assembly was so amazingly simplistic! I am used to 1911's which give me endless trouble reassembling the triggers. I think I'm all set with gun smiths for awhile, I'll just break this one in, I've had enough help for one life time.




I feel exactly the opposite of what you said (in highlights). 1911 triggers are the easiest to reassemble in my opinion. Of course I haven't tried to do this with the M&P. [/quote]



Then how in the world would you know that 1911 triggers are the "easiest" if you have never tried anything to the M&P trigger? :roll: Maybe you should have a looked at your M&P's sear housing and see how simplistic the design is BEFORE your statement.



The M&P's trigger assembly is 10 times easier to work on than any 1911.



The Guinea
 

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The 1911 is simpler. There are less moving parts, and less to polish.



Look at the M&P, trigger bar gets polished, striker saftey gets reprofiled and polished, Striker gets ground and polished, sear gets reprofiled and polished, and springs get changed out on the heavy ones.



I can do a 20 min trigger job on my 1911 touching only 2 parts, sear, and hammer.



M&P is a nice setup for everything that it is.
 

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Jester,

Maybe I am doing something wrong bt it takes me longer to do a 1911 trigger job than it does a M&P. I think they are both pretty simple but the 1911 has to be darn near perfect to work right and feel right (ok Maybe I am just really picky when it comes to 1911's) but to get a really nice trigger on either it will usually take me longer on the 1911.
 

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I'm talking the joe smoe trigger job... I hit the nail on the head on my 1911 trigger setting 3 lbs.



I could never get my M&P like that in that amount of time.
 

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guinea said:
[quote name='effinnewguy'][quote name='CrabPirate']Well I took her apart and replace the new spring with the old, and put some metal conditioner on the sear, now the guns works fine, just got back from the range and put 200 rounds through her, no ftf fte or anything, just like she was when i got her. The trigger assembly was so amazingly simplistic! I am used to 1911's which give me endless trouble reassembling the triggers. I think I'm all set with gun smiths for awhile, I'll just break this one in, I've had enough help for one life time.




I feel exactly the opposite of what you said (in highlights). 1911 triggers are the easiest to reassemble in my opinion. Of course I haven't tried to do this with the M&P. [/quote]



Then how in the world would you know that 1911 triggers are the "easiest" if you have never tried anything to the M&P trigger? :roll: Maybe you should have a looked at your M&P's sear housing and see how simplistic the design is BEFORE your statement.



The M&P's trigger assembly is 10 times easier to work on than any 1911.



The Guinea[/quote]



I suppose its a matter of opinion. I did look at the trigger housing and compared to the 1911, found it more complicated. Again, this is my view. No need to get all huffed and puffed up. Shall we be friends?
 

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Getting back to the orginal post, I made it a personal policy that the only people that work on my guns are folks with REALLY good feedback, like Dan has, or EGW, or some other place like that, or myself. Being a bit on the cheap side that means that I end up doing most of my own work. I get to figure out how things work, and when they break I know why and how to fix them. My own work may not be as good as that of pro's but I never have to worry about paying some local dude my money and getting crap in return. The big names have a name to protect and even in the unlikely event they screw something up they will make it right. The local guy ends up not really giving a damn.



And yeah, I know that there decent local smiths, but there are a lot of them out there that can't tell a Mauser striker from a 1911 firing pin.
 
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