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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I had a question that I thought I would ask you guys. I have a target out behind my house. The target is a little up hill from when I stand. I notice that when I shoot here I am a little low and to the left with my M&P .40, but when I go to the target range I am closer to center. I thought at first that it was off mostly because of being up a little higher than where I was standing, but I have never noticed this with any rife or shotgun that I fired at this target. Also my dad has a Ruger GP100 and when we shoot at the same target it is close to center as well. So here is my question. Is there a reason that I am shooting low and left here?





Thanks
 

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Do a search here - there is a lot that has been said about "low and left". It is almost certainly you and not the gun. You are right-handed and are jerking the trigger, anticipating the recoil, flinching, etc. This will go away with a lot of dry-firing and careful attention paid to a smooth rearward trigger press. When dry-firing make sure that front sight stays put. Load a snap-cap in your mag with your ammo and you will likely see the front sight take a dive when the trigger is pulled on that snap-cap.
 

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For a while I was shooting low and right with my M&P, about 2" right and 1" low at 7-10m. I would transition to a different pistol and shoot center, so I thought it was perhaps my sights. I did a bit of dry fire practice to work on my trigger pull, and I solidified my grip and supportive hand and the problem went away.



Operator head-space, as we military folks like to call it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
See I thought the same thing that it could have been my sights because I could switch to my dads revolver and shoot better, but then I took it to an indoor gun range where I bought mine at and shot there and I was a lot better. My dads GP100 is a 6" barrel, could that be a reason for the difference in outcomes? Thanks
 

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Your grip, especially if you don't have a good grip down pat, can change somewhat if you are aiming at targets above your natural point of aim or below it.



If I have been focusing on my time too much for too long, my grip gets lighter and can cause some significant accuracy issues for me. I run into this periodically when i get a bit obsesses on running stages quicker at USPSA matches because I am tall, and in some pits we have to set targets lower for safety purposes.



Groups open up, but I also can get the low and left syndrome if I am shooting something I slap the triger on like my 1911 (or my M&P if i am getting sloppy).
 
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