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Discussion Starter #1
Thanks for having me here. I will be picking up my new M&P 9mm Shield California Compliant semi auto soon. Also having the Streamlight TLR-6 laser light attached.

My last semi auto pistol was a Sig Sauer 228 from 30 years ago, which was sold (regretfully). That Sig has a traditional hammer design along with a de-cocking lever to lower the hammer, with no safety locks whatsoever. If I chamber a round in the Sig and decide I don't want to fire it, I simply press down the de-cocking lever to safely lower the hammer. This is what I'm familiar with.

How do I do the equivalence of de-cocking my new M&P Shield pistol since it has no hammer that I can physically lower? I think it has to do with "resetting" the trigger on the Shield, but I'm still confused about this even after watching a bunch of YouTube videos on this topic.

Here's my scenario: Insert a fully loaded magazine into the Shield grip. Then pull the slide back to chamber a round. At this point, I imagine that a "virtual hammer" inside the slide is "cocked" which makes it ready to fire in a "single action trigger mode" (or equivalence thereof). But I decide I don't want to fire the round that is chambered. Then what? How do I de-cock and lower the virtual hammer, while maintaining a round in the chamber?

Sorry if I'm not wording my question properly with the correct jargon and concepts. If someone can kindly give me a very layman basic tutorial on answering my question, I would highly appreciate it.

Also: Is it a good idea to buy some so-called dummy rounds so I can practice this at home? How do dummy rounds work? Is there an actual loud bang noise as if I'm firing a live bullet? I just want to fire dummy rounds without making any "bang" noise at home. Is this possible?

Will the below link for dummy rounds allow me to safely practice "resetting" the Shield trigger at home without making a loud bang sound to alarm the neighbors?

Thank you!!
 

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Thanks for having me here. I will be picking up my new M&P 9mm Shield California Compliant semi auto soon. Also having the Streamlight TLR-6 laser light attached.

My last semi auto pistol was a Sig Sauer 228 from 30 years ago, which was sold (regretfully). That Sig has a traditional hammer design along with a de-cocking lever to lower the hammer, with no safety locks whatsoever. If I chamber a round in the Sig and decide I don't want to fire it, I simply press down the de-cocking lever to safely lower the hammer. This is what I'm familiar with.

How do I do the equivalence of de-cocking my new M&P Shield pistol since it has no hammer that I can physically lower? I think it has to do with "resetting" the trigger on the Shield, but I'm still confused about this even after watching a bunch of YouTube videos on this topic.

Here's my scenario: Insert a fully loaded magazine into the Shield grip. Then pull the slide back to chamber a round. At this point, I imagine that a "virtual hammer" inside the slide is "cocked" which makes it ready to fire in a "single action trigger mode" (or equivalence thereof). But I decide I don't want to fire the round that is chambered. Then what? How do I de-cock and lower the virtual hammer, while maintaining a round in the chamber?

Sorry if I'm not wording my question properly with the correct jargon and concepts. If someone can kindly give me a very layman basic tutorial on answering my question, I would highly appreciate it.

Also: Is it a good idea to buy some so-called dummy rounds so I can practice this at home? How do dummy rounds work? Is there an actual loud bang noise as if I'm firing a live bullet? I just want to fire dummy rounds without making any "bang" noise at home. Is this possible?

Will the below link for dummy rounds allow me to safely practice "resetting" the Shield trigger at home without making a loud bang sound to alarm the neighbors?

Thank you!!
With the Shield you don’t need dummy rounds, it’s fine to dry fire. I did however just buy a Gen 3 G-Sight and love it, works great with the app and my groupings with both 9mm and 45 ACP Shields are very tight. Any training laser I would recommend to practice with, cheaper than the range. (Not as much fun though) You’ll love your Shield!
 

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The "dummy rounds" you are asking about are called "snap caps" or "action proving rounds" and they are just inert plastic or aluminum rounds with a soft insert where the primer would be in a real cartridge. They are used to safely check action functioning like feeding and ejection and to protect the firing pin while dry firing. They make no noise at all.

The Shield is a striker fired gun and there is no hammer to lower. The internal safeties and firing pin block make it safe to carry with a round chambered as it won't fire without a deliberate trigger pull. There is also an external thumb safety you can use as an extra precaution.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you all for kindly providing input to my questions, much appreciated!

So I've learned that there is no equivalence of de-cocking a Shield, I would need to remove the magazine, rack the slide to eject the chambered round. End of story. I accept that.

But I'm not understanding what it means to "reset" the trigger. What is the point of resetting a trigger? I've watch YouTube videos on this that shows the physical action of resetting the trigger but the videos don't explain the reason for doing so. Additionally, I was further confused by the trigger design of the Shield for both the 1.0 and 2.0 versions. I thought I purchased a 2.0 Shield version with the redesigned trigger. But I later realized I'm getting the 1.0 version of the Shield because the 2.0 is only available for law enforcement in California. Do I need to learn how to reset the trigger?
 

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Resetting the trigger occurs when the gun is fired releasing the striker. As the slide cycles back then forward the striker is recocked. When you then release the trigger to it's forward position the sear "resets". You can hear and feel the "click as this takes place.

You can duplicate this when dry firing (MAKE SURE THE MAGAZINE IS REMOVED AND THE CHAMBER EMPTY)
Pull the trigger and hold it to the rear. While keeping the trigger fully depressed, cycle the slide all the way back then release it. After completely cycling the slide, slowly release the trigger. Again you should hear and feel a click as the sear resets just before the trigger completes it's full forward travel.

You don't have to learn to reset the sear. It's part of the natural function of firing the gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You don't have to learn to reset the sear. It's part of the natural function of firing the gun.
Aaaah, thank you! That makes sense, thanks for the explanation. I was going a little nutty trying to figure out the point of learning the trigger reset, LOL! My last pistols were the Sig Sauer 228 and a Colt Mustang 380. Those were purchased 30 years ago in the good ol' days of the hammer design. I have no experience with the current crop of hammer-less pistols, this is all new to me.
 

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A Sig P228 has trigger "reset" as does a Colt Mustang. The reset "ability" of the trigger is independent as to the presence of a hammer. The simple mechanical act of the trigger / trigger bar releasing a cocked sear, whether it be a sear lug on a striker assembly or a hammer, to cause the firing pin to move forward (whether struck by the hammer or powered by the captured spring tensioned in a striker assembly), is assured when the slide cycles immediately after the cartridge ignited. IF you hold the trigger pinned back against the frame after a shot, the sear will have been re-engaged by the time the slide has cycled forward back into full battery. When you then slowly release the trigger forward, a distinctive click can be felt / heard broadcasting the firearm is again armed to fire, i.e. the sear has re-engaged the trigger mechanism. The forward distance required for the specific firearm to reach it's reset position varies based on the mechanical geometries internally; any additional forward motion of the trigger allowed afterwards by the operator is the "pre-travel" distance until the trigger comes to rest at its most forward static position without any trigger pressure. Some users prefer a "short" reset distance in the misguided belief that it affords an opportunity for a faster follow-up shot. IF one is slowing down their trigger manipulation pace "to feel the reset" then re-engage the rearward trigger pull, this method is certainly not the fastest method to cause a follow-up shot.

As can be seen in the diagram, the reset distance for the M&P is roughly 1/2 the distance
required for a trigger pull sear release starting from the resting position.

Caution: Pseudo-science and / or amateur photos may be embedded in this post.


Screen Shot 2020-05-13 at 6.04.48 PM.png
 

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With my Shield 2.0 I find during dry fire I only need to pull the slide back about 1/2" to 'cock' it and ready to fire again.
 
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