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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I would post some of my favorite pistol drills over the next few days







  • draw and fire one shot taking care to follow through. Go no faster than you can get "A" hits 10 yds



    draw and fire two shots taking care to follow through. The placement of the shots should be very close together. Go no faster than you can get "A" hits 10 yds



    Old standard 2 to the body one to the head. The head shot should be fired on the muzzle rise & should like one continuous string. Bang Bang Bang not Bang Bang Bang 7 yds



    six shots in 2 sec. It sounds easy but it takes a sub 1 sec. draw and .20 splits. Pretty darn hard to do consistently. I'll generally try 5-6 times and if I make it once I quit. 7 yds



    3 targets 3 yards apart. 2 shots on the center 1 on each outside target and 2 more in the center. This drill makes you focus on sight alignment and should sound like one string. That is time between shots on one target should be the same as shots between targets. 5-10 yds



    Same as A but 1 shot on the center 2 shots on each outside target and 1 more in the center. I find this drill harder to do correctly as I really want to fire 2 shots on the center target to start. 5- 10 yds



    Variation on above but the center target is at 5 yes. Start on the center target Fire 1 at the center 2 shots on each outside target and 1 more on the center. This is fired 3 times once facing downrange once facing right and once facing left. 5-10 yds



    stand behind low barricade drop to kneeling and fire 2 shots at a different target from each position (right cover center cover and left

    cover 12 yds



    Hackathorn's famous drill. Make a square about 5 yards on a side. Start at any corner and fire two shots on each target while moving to the next corner. Keep going until you are back to the starting point. This is the best shooting while moving drill that there is. Keep your knees bent. and try not to forget where you are. 7-12 yds



    Set up 3 barrels at 10 15 & 20 yards in a zigzag pattern. Fire 2 shots at each target from each barrel while kneeling. Using good cover. Wear Hatch knee pads if you are old like me. 10-20 yds



    fire 6 head shots on one target. If you are jerking the trigger this will "kill" you. "My gun shoots low left I'm not jerking the trigger" yea right!! 20 yds










    • Mike
 

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follow through question

Having NO expereince on competitive shoot I'm not really sure what you mean by follow through. Please elaborate.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Having NO experience on competitive shoot I'm not really sure what you mean by follow through. Please elaborate.


follow through has nothing much to do with competitive shooting but all to do with being able to shoot well.



The way I describe it is watching the front sight through the entire recoil cycle. You should see the sight move up off the point of aim and back down to the exact point as then the pistol was fired. I to this day remember when I first realized I could actually know where my shot went Other folks describe it as calling your shot. Either way it is a major part of being able to truly shoot well and second in importance to trigger control.



Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #4




On of my favorites that I shoot all the time is shot on the DEA dot target. It is real quick taking less than a minute. The drill is very hard to shoot clean. I start at 10 yards if I shoot clean I back up a step if not I go forward a step. The drill is all about trigger control (or the lack there of)



1. 1 shot from low ready at dot 1

2. 1 shot from low ready at dot 1

3. 1 shot at dot 2 from holster

4. 1 shot at dot 2 from holster

5. 2 shots on dot 3 from low ready

6. 2 shots on dot 4 from holster

7. 1 shot on dot 5 and 1 on dot 6 from ready

8. 1 shot on 6 reload one shot on 5 from holster



Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Shooting & Moving



Fire one shot step off line fire one shot 4 times to the right and 4 times to the left

7 yards 16 rounds



Shooting while moving sideways



Fire 2 shots while moving to the left

Fire 2 shots while moving to the right

Repeat twice

7 yards 12 rounds



Fire three shots while moving to the left

Fire three shots while moving to the right

Repeat twice

7 yards 18 rounds



Shooting while retreating



Fire 6 shots while retreating take a step or two before firing

Repeat twice

Keep the pistol out of reach of the opponent until you get some distance

1 yard 18 rounds
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I have a bunch of targets made in auto cad I can sent them to you if you can read them or I can convert them to something else if you can not.



I typically print targets on my 17/22" format printer



Mike
 

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I have a plotter at work if you send them to me I'd love to get some.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
X-Drill





Two IDPA targets spaced 3 yards apart 7 yards distant



One shot to the body of target 1 then one shot to the head of target 2

One shot to the body of target 2 then one shot to the head of target 1

Repeat twice



You should try to shoot this as fast as possible

the drill should teach you to speed up on easy shots (full body) and slow down for the more difficult shots





Mike



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Ahhh the good ole days. I was ankle deep in brass in the 90s doing some of those drills.



If i recall my best time on a el pres was 3.79 and best on a mosambique sp? was 2.89
 

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These drills are great, but where do you practice them? I'm not allowed to do ANY of this kind of stuff other than slow fire and 2-3 shot bursts at my local indoor range? Is there ever a time when you can go practice this sort of thing at indoor ranges?
 

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Discussion Starter #17
These drills are great, but where do you practice them? I'm not allowed to do ANY of this kind of stuff other than slow fire and 2-3 shot bursts at my local indoor range? Is there ever a time when you can go practice this sort of thing at indoor ranges?




Join a gun club with an outdoor range. I rarely shoot at an indoor range. Just like you said there is not much you can do in most of them.



go to www.idpa.com www.uspsa.org and look for clubs in your area. Clubs that have practical shooting matches will have like minded shooters to practice with.



Mike
 

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Thanks for all the GREAT INFO!!
 

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It takes far more than just doing drills for one to improve his combat handgunnary skills. One obvious and important omission from this thread is information pertaining to proper technique. Almost all of these techniques are utilized in both self-defense and competitive environments. Without proper technique, one can expend significant amounts of time and ammo on the drills and not achieve desired results, which can be quite frustrating. There are many technical nuances a lesser skilled combat handgunner can learn over time to both reduce their shooting times while also increasing the accuracy of their shots. Learning combat handgunnary is similar to learning other sports such as football, tennis, golf, etc. There are different ways to hold the club, racquet, ball, etc as well as different ways to throw and hit to produce different desired results. All this takes LOTS of repetition over time to learn as a skill. Fortunately, much of the combat handgunnary skills can be practiced at home instead of at the range firing live rounds of ammo (e.g., 1000s of practice draws and mag reloads using an unloaded gun with mags loaded with snap caps).



Also missing from this thread are suggestions for equipment selection. It goes without saying that equipment selection will help or hamper your combat handgunnary skills. The first obvious choice is the gun. Some shoot faster, while others shoot more accurately, while other draw faster, while others reload faster, while other index faster than the others, etc. Additionally, as one’s combat handgunnary skills improve over time, one usually finds that their first and even subsequent selections were not the right ones. It’s OK because equipment change is normal as one climbs the learning curve. In fact, if/when you get really good at this, you should be able to master all types of different configuration handguns. Other equipment selection considerations: custom mods to the gun, holster, mag pouches, belt, progressive reloader(!), etc. Finally, we can’t forget the one important piece of equipment that quantifies the progression of your skills is the all-important shot timer.



Over the years, I’ve read numerous books, magazine articles, and watched instructional video on combat handgunnary skills. One single source book that I found that covers in great detail both the skills and equipment aspects of combat handgunnary is “The Gun Digest Book of Combat Handgunnary, 6th Ed” by Massad Ayoob. IMO, Ayoob’s book teaches the right skills the right way focusing on practical self-defense/IDPA style techniques. You can also find lots of combat handgunning video on internet venues such as youtube.



Most important thing to remember is to ENJOY both your practice sessions and the learning process too.



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