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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, mostly asking the professional smiths on this forum;



what trigger gauge to you use to check weight? brand and type?

Where on the trigger do you make contact with the trigger contact point of the gauge?



Do you feel there are any possibilities to get inaccurate readings because of inconsistent methods?



Is it me, or would it seem that striker fired pistols with a long range of pretravel may be more difficult to get consistent?



And finally, do you take a series of pulls and average them to get a final reading?





thanks!
 

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olyeller said:
Hi, mostly asking the professional smiths on this forum;
I'm not a professional smith, but it is my last name and it is my carry gun. 8)



what trigger gauge to you use to check weight? brand and type?
I use this one: http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/store/Pro...GGER+PULL+GAUGE



Where on the trigger do you make contact with the trigger contact point of the gauge?
The lower portion so that it mimics a the pull of a finger. :wink:



Do you feel there are any possibilities to get inaccurate readings because of inconsistent methods?
I think probably so. The more pressure you put against the tool, the more it will register. I go nice and easy until the trigger breaks and I try to minimize any further and unnecessary rearward movement.



When I had my carry guns inspected, the armorer's method was to use the pistol to pick the gauge up off the table and then actually jerk the gun.



Is it me, or would it seem that striker fired pistols with a long range of pretravel may be more difficult to get consistent?
With a digital gauge where even the slightest variations register, they are all the same to me. Striker fired or otherwise.



And finally, do you take a series of pulls and average them to get a final reading?
I do. I measure it 10 times and take an average. My gauge even does the math for me.



 

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That pretty much covers it. A good digital scale will record the # at its highest point, so after the trigger breaks you still have the pull weight!
 

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Pretty much the the accepted "best method" is to use a set of NRA trigger weights. Having calibrated mass hanging on the trigger is the least error prone method of measuring. No issues with trying something hard like calibrating a spring or making sure your stress meter is not out of whack over time or becuase the temperature changed or something.



It's most common to measure from the position on the trigger that gives you the most leverage, as people seem to mind more if you go under a certain weight than over by a little. If you tell someone it si a 4lb trigger, you want to to be at least a 4lb trigger, not 2.8lb if i grab it funny.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Any pros?
 

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I'm not a gunsmith, but raz-o's method (and the use of a professional NRA weight set) is what I've always done and seen used by professionals. I have a set at home.



Measuring trigger pull can be as much an art as a science and it's not at all difficult to fudge readings by changing technique slightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
exactly.

I can add or minus a pound easily, just by making an unnoticable adjustment in my technique.



A point is that one person's 3# trigger isnt another 'smiths 3# trigger.



Not a big deal, really, cause the average shooter would believ that a crisp #5 trigger is really a 3# one.
 

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Well, there is a proper way to do it, as raz-o explained. But you're correct, a 'smith could fudge it one way or the other if he chose to and most customers don't have their own NRA weight set at home.



I'd also argue that a crisp 5# trigger is better for almost every endeavor than a less crisp 3# trigger, but then that's been my personal crusade lately.
 

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yeah, I left out one important bit. That the weight is applied by VERY slowly lifting the gun against the weight. The gun of course needs to be unloaded for safety.



You lift the gun a little faster, the trigger looks a little lighter than it is.
 

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My goal is always, "don't trip the trigger." I try as hard as I can -- go as slow as I can -- to prevent the trigger from breaking.
 
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