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I was just wondering, since the trigger is so light, how do you know where to put pressure right before the trigger breaks? Mine will break just a tiny bit before the stop in the trigger guard, and since its so light I have trouble finding where to put pressure right before the trigger breaks.
 

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I'm not sure that I'm following what your question is. Will your trigger not release the sear if you are pulling at certain places along the trigger (e.g. more toward the bottom of the trigger)? I had this problem initially when I did the trigger job on my M&P. I has little to do with weight of the pull and more to do with the trigger bar's interaction with the sear (there isn't sufficient contact to rotate the sear away from the striker). You'll need to remove some material from the top of the sear. However, make sure that at least .028" of sear/striker engagement remains. Doing this should bring your release point on your trigger pull a little farther forward- enough for a consistent release of the sear.
 

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I guess you could say there is quite a bit of pre-travel. The trigger will release the sear at the same point everytime. But its at almost the very end of the trigger, and with the stock trigger. I was able to easily put pressure untill there was resistance where i knew the trigger would break after this point. I guess I just have to get used to it being so light,
 

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What you are speaking of is staging the trigger. You want to pull through the trigger stroke until the shot breaks and you have finished your follow through, then release the distance you've trained your muscle memory on from dry firing so that the sear resets, then repeat as you started.
 

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One of the side affects of the trigger job and shortening of the reset is that the actual trigger stroke is significantly reduced. There is now a greater amout of pre-travel, but the actual trigger pull is very near the end of the stroke and likely pretty crisp.



All pistols have this to some degree- it is just more oticeable when your pistol went from a long spongy stroke to one with a lot of pretravel and a short pull. I've gotten used to this on my M&P. Thr trigger pull is still consistent, short and light. If you are shooting for speed, the practive of "prepping" the trigger (pulling the trigger to the point where all pre-travel is taken up and the sear is just about to be fully engaged) comes into play.



Follow-up shots should be performed with the trigger brought forward just enough to reset- no need to repeat the whole long trigger stroke again.



Also, some people have mentioned that they preferred a larger grip on thteir M&P post trigger job. This has the affect of making the trigger pull occur farther out from your palm, and feel less like you are about to touch your palm with you trigger finger during the firing stroke. I did this to my M&P, and can certainly say that I prefer the medium grip now over the small one that was on it prior to my trigger job.
 

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ClosetCaseNerd said:
What you are speaking of is staging the trigger. You want to pull through the trigger stroke until the shot breaks and you have finished your follow through, then release the distance you've trained your muscle memory on from dry firing so that the sear resets, then repeat as you started.


Doesn't the need for recoil (or at least a small amount of slide travel) to preload the striker make the reset point awkward to return to when you are dry firing?
 

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I think what you are sayng is the trigger is so light you can't feel the point at which the trigger bar has hit the sear and is ready to release the sear. If this is the case and this is a carry gun this is real bad. and dangerous. That is why I don't do triggers under four pounds. I know you should not have your finger on the trigger until ready to shoot but if you need a very precise shot and you can't feel the sear release point you are going to loose and round you were not ready for.

There is no need for a trigger that light. Not even for competition. I used to shoot IPSC and gained at one point was winning A class and master class raiting matches with a glock 19 with a 5 pound trigger.

It any of you have been around Ernest Langdon and have had the chance to shoot his M&P you will find his trigger is not all that impressive. It is just a good clean somewhat shortened reset trigger. That's all it needs to be. Practice is what is needed not a ultra light trigger.

CHECK 360

David Bowie
 
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