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How do you do it, and does it really protect your gun?



Was wondering on the function of snap caps. Do you need snap caps to do it?
 

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In my opinion it doesn't really matter, but if it would make you feel better just make sure your weapon is unloaded, point in a safe direction and pull the trigger. No big deal.
 

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Quality springs will never "set" unless they are over bent or forcibly straightened. In a well engineered firearm, the springs are never over compressed and will actually have a "statistically significant" amount of compression remaining in the spring.



A standard range of motion also will not change the spring rate (k) when dealing with a spring. Oxidation, temper, and a few other factors can change it, but cycling the firearm or not cycling the firearm will not have an effect on the spring itself. This is also true for mags. If you do not over load them, do not bind the springs, and the springs/mags don't rust, you can keep them loaded indefinitely.



MI_Jester
 

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Quality springs will never "set" unless they are over bent or forcibly straightened. In a well engineered firearm, the springs are never over compressed and will actually have a "statistically significant" amount of compression remaining in the spring.



A standard range of motion also will not change the spring rate (k) when dealing with a spring. Oxidation, temper, and a few other factors can change it, but cycling the firearm or not cycling the firearm will not have an effect on the spring itself. This is also true for mags. If you do not over load them, do not bind the springs, and the springs/mags don't rust, you can keep them loaded indefinitely.



MI_Jester


The myth that springs left compressed will take a permanant "set" or that if you release the tension the springs will "relax" and regain their former strength refuses to die.



This question, in one form or another, shows up about once a week on every shooting forum I subscribe to.
 

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Actually, spring set is not a myth, it can happen. The key item is for the spring to be a quality spring and used within its design intent. If these items are met youre safe from set. If not springs can be damaged.



With that said, most springs made today, aside from some cheapo Chinese imports for toys and such, are more than able to stand up to their intended uses. There is also a LOT more knowledge available for designers and engineers to insure that their parts dont damage components.



You should be safe with leaving the striker compressed over time, just as you would while having a round in the chamber during regular use. If not, I would use the lever recommended for disassembly.
 

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Actually, spring set is not a myth, it can happen. The key item is for the spring to be a quality spring and used within its design intent. If these items are met youre safe from set. If not springs can be damaged.


True, abuse can damage any spring pemanently but that's not the question being asked here or on the other forums I mentioned. The question here is; "will quality springs, used within their design limits, take a set if left compressed?" The answer is an unqualified no.
 

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How do you do it, and does it really protect your gun?



Was wondering on the function of snap caps. Do you need snap caps to do it?




After cleaning (or handling) and before storage for it's HD use potential, I put a snap cap in the chamber, release the slide, load a full mag, then pull the trigger to release the striker. Obviously I stare at the snap cap, and sometimes if my wife is around, I'll verbally say "snap cap in chamber, closing slide and loading live magazine" before pulling trigger (muzzle pointed in safest direction). I'm aware that upon retrieval of my M&P9 in the event of a home invasion, I need to rack the slide to put a live round in the chamber..wife knows this too..in fact, we do timed tests for how quickly we can retrieve it and load it/rack it.



I too don't like the spring (especially the striker spring) tense during storage for obvious reasons. The debate of spring tension is obviously not over, but it doesn't matter because springs cost next to nothing and can/should be replaced at predetermined round counts or with other such determination.
 

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Actually, after a new spring takes a "set", you can leave it compressed for decades without loss of function, I KNOW that sounds counter-intuitive, but 1911Tuner said that he rec'd a from-the-war 1911, cocked, locked, and stored which functioned perfectly. FWIW



I have been told, repeatedly, that it's not the load, but the flexing that kills springs.



b-
 

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It's not the load, it's the flexing that kills the spring.




My M&P has been loaded almost 24/7 for six months. Except for a little time spent at a match on a cold range or in an airplane, the gun has been loaded. The striker spring is a completely non-issue.
 

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Hey guys.



I'm sitting at my desk with a Marlin/Glenfield Model 60 .22 cal that hadn't been fired since the summer of 1978, that's 29 1/2 years, and the action has been locked open all that time. Two months ago I bought a new mainspring because I gave the rifle to my son but it wasn't cycling correctly. I've decided this would be a good time to swap out that spring.



Again, the old spring has been compressed for close to 30 years and is now 5.274" long. The new one from Brownell's is 5.75" long for a difference of .476 or 8.3%. It would appear that some settling has occurred but that might have happened in the first few years FAIK.



[attachment=48:Marlin_G...w_spring.jpg]



Kevin.



P.S. After installing the new spring the bolt is noticeably heavier. The action slams closed now.
 

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The question is, how much did you shoot the gun before storing it 29 1/2 years ago and how long was the spring at that time?
 

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It's not the load, it's the flexing that kills the spring.




My M&P has been loaded almost 24/7 for six months. Except for a little time spent at a match on a cold range or in an airplane, the gun has been loaded. The striker spring is a completely non-issue.


Mines been loaded 24/7 with one in the hole for 2 years(not the same one
) with no problems. I agree its the abuse or the motion of the spring that causes failure/wear
 

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The question is, how much did you shoot the gun before storing it 29 1/2 years ago and how long was the spring at that time?
Dude,



I never meant this as an argument, I just thought it sounded relevant. If I'm annoying anyone just skip my posts please.



That was a long time ago. I think it was a gift for my 12th birthday in '70, I probably put 500-600 rounds through it in 6 years, then stored it with the action open when I finished my AA in '78 before attending an out of state university for my BS. Didn't clean or fire it again until 2 months ago and was surprised it was working so poorly. I assume the spring started out at 5.75" but could have settled some, I'm not a real gunsmith so I can't say for sure.



I haven't fired it yet but the action feels much snappier and sure.



Kevin.
 

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A while back came across an old WWII GI M1911A1 w a loaded mag in it and the hammer cocked but not on safe. Had been sitting like that in a basket in a closet for at least 15 yrs, maybe longer (ammo in it was WWII GI too BTW). Owner passed away 15 yrs ago, daughter came across it when mother passed away.



Gun, mag, and ammo all worked just fine.
 

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After cleaning (or handling) and before storage for it's HD use potential, I put a snap cap in the chamber, release the slide, load a full mag, then pull the trigger to release the striker. Obviously I stare at the snap cap, and sometimes if my wife is around, I'll verbally say "snap cap in chamber, closing slide and loading live magazine" before pulling trigger (muzzle pointed in safest direction). I'm aware that upon retrieval of my M&P9 in the event of a home invasion, I need to rack the slide to put a live round in the chamber..wife knows this too..in fact, we do timed tests for how quickly we can retrieve it and load it/rack it.



I too don't like the spring (especially the striker spring) tense during storage for obvious reasons. The debate of spring tension is obviously not over, but it doesn't matter because springs cost next to nothing and can/should be replaced at predetermined round counts or with other such determination.


I do not think leaving the striker spring compressed will harm it. But, if I assume with you that it will, you are trading wear on the striker spring for a significantly slower reaction time if you need to use the gun in an emergency. Even if the striker spring is degraded by leaving it compressed, wouldn't you prefer to replace it every year (or even every six months) and have the gun ready instantly ready to go? Not to be too much of a smart-ass, but you may find yourself where an intruder has harmed or killed you because you couldn't get the snap cap out and reload the gun fast enough, but you will be able to die secure in the knowledge that your strike spring has not been overstressed.



Again, though, I think the idea that keeping the gun cocked unduly wears the spring is not correct in the first place.
 

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I never release the tension on my M&P's hammer spring.









Because it doesn't have a hammer.







(sorry, couldn't resist)



 
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