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The trigger glitches on my M&P 45 M2.0. For those who don't know, this manifests as a jump to one side as the shot breaks. I can control it with grip, but my both my M&P 9 M2.0 pistols do not do this.

What is the fix for "the glitch"?
 

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You are seeing this during Dry-fire exercises, I assume. The jump that you are seeing is attributable to the amount of over-travel in the trigger as the trigger slaps the frame just past the break. (The more travel, the more the jump in the front site due to an accelerating finger being abruptly stopped. The jump you are seeing is not usually seen in the point-of-impact on your targets, but it can be annoying during dry-fire exercises, and different guns will have this phenomenon to one degree or another... Except for 1911s of course. :evil:

I always do my own trigger jobs on my M&Ps, which always includes an over-travel stop on the frame. I cannot really describe the process, except to say that it involves JB Weld and black cerakote to match the frame... It ends up looking like the gun was made with the enlarged over-travel stop from the factory. For me, this eliminates all unnecessary trigger movement and even provides a shorter reset, the way I like.

I hope that helps.

A peek at one of my over-travel stops...
 

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Rather than answer your same question on two different forums........

If you separate the slide from the frame and manipulate the trigger it will isolate where in the trigger mechanism the "glitch" is occurring. If the glitch is gone with the slide off, then the problem resides in either the engagement of the trigger bar with the safety block plunger or with the plunger itself having a rough excursion. If the glitch remains with the slide off, then your problem is in the trigger bar-spring-sear connector system, then you just need to isolate wherein it is occurring.
 

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What you are seeing is actually quite normal with an M&P when dry firing. If you look at how the slide is captured to the frame rails, there is four points of contact between the frame and slide. When the slide is retracted and the striker is captured by the sear there are now five points of contact. That fifth point between the striker (in the slide) and the sear (in the frame) adds tension (striker spring) that when the striker is released allows the slide to move due to the tolerances of the slide to frame rail fit and the energy released by the striker spring.
 

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What you are seeing is actually quite normal with an M&P when dry firing. If you look at how the slide is captured to the frame rails, there is four points of contact between the frame and slide. When the slide is retracted and the striker is captured by the sear there are now five points of contact. That fifth point between the striker (in the slide) and the sear (in the frame) adds tension (striker spring) that when the striker is released allows the slide to move due to the tolerances of the slide to frame rail fit and the energy released by the striker spring.

I just checked my M 2.0 45 and I didn't notice anything like this. I am already planning on doing the Apex to it anyway. I assume this would fix his problem?
 

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I just checked my M 2.0 45 and I didn't notice anything like this. I am already planning on doing the Apex to it anyway. I assume this would fix his problem?
Its a tolerance issue. The Apex parts have nothing to do with it. Some M&P's do it worse than others. 1.0 M&P's I have owned were far worse than the 2.0's I now own. Different springs can have a subtle effect on reducing how noticeable it is. It really is a non issue though. What matters is if the gun is accurate when you actually shoot bullets. If it is then no worries.
 
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