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Discussion Starter #1
Obviously, I need to practice this drill more often. Haven't really thought/done it since purchasing my M&P's (of which I am very happy). When I did try - I was taken back by the results.



Typcially in this drill you can not use your normal or dominant hand to draw, fire or otherwise manipulate the weapon. You are simulating a wound to your dominant side that precludes you from using it.



So you must use the weak side only. Draw, fire, reload and clear any malfunctions. Reloading and clearing malfunctions requires you to rack the slide. Typically the rear sight has had a snag point(s) allowing you to rack the slide by pushing down against your pistol belt, pant pocket opening or holster.



Problem:

M&P rear sights are so smooth with no snag points it (up to this point) has been virtually impossible to rack the slide using only the weak hand. I am currently using Trijicon night sights.



Has anyone else noticed this and/or has a work around? Being able to reload or clear a potential malfunction without the use of your dominant side is not easy to begin with. It s appears the M&P may make even harder to near impossible.



Thoughts?
 

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The response to this problem on my wife's full size 9mm is the installation of a 10-8 Performance rear sight. One handed manipulation capability was a requirement for the designer(s) of this sight. I believe that the 10-8 Performance rear sight is the best rear sight available for a fighting pistol.
 

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I found out during a outdoors shoot that both me and my brother shot better one handed, and at the with our left hands.



I don't think I could rack the slide in its current condition one handed though, and im not sure how well I would shoot if I was injured either.



Something to think about and practice now though.
 

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Hi, new guy here.



Can you just catch the front sight on a seam or something? I have basically the same sights on a G19 and I was able to one-hand rack in a class last year. I haven't tried it with the M&P yet. Also, have you thought about kneeling and putting the pistol behind your knee, then pulling the slide back? Not too safe (without professional instruction), and not to be practiced with ammo at first but possible.



There are any number of good pistol instructors who would help you work this out in one of their classes.



M_P
 

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With sufficient pressure into the body, the Novak sight will work to rack the slide. Does help if you're wearing a duty type belt. The edge of the ejection port is also an option.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone.



I have tried the front sight - - it works. I should have thought about that one. Will try the ejection port and report back.
 

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Try using some very aggressive skate board tape on the top of the slide. Then you can rack the slide on you leg.
 

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Check Dan Burwells site, he has designed some rear sights to resolve that problem. Or get a left hand holster and carry on both sides
 

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bang-flash said:
careful using the front sight. the bang end could be close to soft stuff.


Best solution I ahve found is to use the front sight against various portions of the sole of the shoe (heel area, where exactly depends on what you are wearing), or a table or other convenient object.
 

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raz-0 said:
Best solution I ahve found is to use the front sight against various portions of the sole of the shoe (heel area, where exactly depends on what you are wearing), or a table or other convenient object.


The only problem with that approach is that it can be tricky depending on your position (standing vs. kneeling vs. prone vs. driving vs. ???). Using some random object is great if there is something flat and hard enough nearby, and if you're aware enough in the middle of a fight.



The fact is, the rear sight on the M&P is poor for a real life practical/tactical gun. Institutional inertia led to someone believing that "Novak" on the marketing sheet was worth more than practical operation in the field.
 

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ToddG said:
The only problem with that approach is that it can be tricky depending on your position (standing vs. kneeling vs. prone vs. driving vs. ???). Using some random object is great if there is something flat and hard enough nearby, and if you're aware enough in the middle of a fight.



The fact is, the rear sight on the M&P is poor for a real life practical/tactical gun. Institutional inertia led to someone believing that "Novak" on the marketing sheet was worth more than practical operation in the field.


Well, if you have a disable arm, and are driving and in a gun fight, good luck to you.



You can make the front sight + boot thing work pretty well and reasonably fast with a little practice from standing or kneeling. From prone, you pretty much have to do front sight on belt, or wedge the slide between a body part and the ground if you want something expedient.



Heck, waht if you wear suspenders? There are no guarantees in the real world of unexpected stuff happening. Even with something like my baby eagle which is super easy to rack with the rear sight, not having a belt will slow you down. But it is a heck of a lot easier to snag on the draw. Which is why some people like no-snag deisgns as tactical rather than what you can use to rack the slide easily. Life is a compromise. Hopefully, when you look back on it, the sum total of SHTF situations you have found yourself in will have had more draws than crippled limbs.



Other things you can do: If you have a kydex holster for the M&P, you can rack it on the holster by just jamming the slide into the ejection port cutout and pushing down. At least on my holster.
 

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raz-0 said:
[quote name='ToddG']

Well, if you have a disable arm, and are driving and in a gun fight, good luck to you.
[/quote]



I was thinking more along the lines of being a passenger and/or being in a stopped car but that's funny dude.



You can make the front sight + boot thing work pretty well and reasonably fast with a little practice from standing or kneeling. From prone, you pretty much have to do front sight on belt, or wedge the slide between a body part and the ground if you want something expedient.


I agree it's workable. I've been working on it myself because for the moment I have a stock night sight on my M&P. It just requires more conditional branching and awareness than the standard method of using the rear sight on the belt/holster. The simple fact is that the sight design is poor and needs to be addressed for a gun intended for combat.



But it is a heck of a lot easier to snag on the draw. Which is why some people like no-snag deisgns as tactical rather than what you can use to rack the slide easily.


How do the Smith sights reduce the chance of a snag on a draw? The angled part is in front, not the side of the sight that will contact your cover garment, holster retention strap, whatever. The "slant" sights for the M&P make it easier to put back in the holster, in theory, but as someone who's carried non-slant sights for the past ten years I've never had a problem.
 
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