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M&P=More ergonomic, lower bore axis, better trigger although the 226 and 229 come in multiple trigger types. Melonite is probably a better finish than Nitron. Never been impressed by Nitron. Smith has better customer service as well.
 

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There have been various iterations of what SIG calls "Nitron" with varying degrees of corrosion and abrasion resistance. The current version is actually quite good.



I think it would be hard to argue with the statement that the M&P is more ergonomic. Shorter trigger reach, multiple size grip inserts, ambi slide stop all make the gun easily configurable to the individual. In addition, the M&P mag catch is reversible by the user, while the SIG version is technically an "armorer only" operation.



The SIG gives you more trigger options (TDA, DAK, SRT, SAO on some models), while the M&P provides the one type action not available on the SIG (striker-fired). There are benefits of (and arguments for) each action type.
 

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I have been carrying a Sig P225 as an off duty gun for a while, and now that I have been issued the M&P9, I will be carrying it both on and off duty. Sigs are great, no gripes, but the Smith suits me very well. Feels good in the hand, easy to shoot, accurate, light and relatively compact, what more could I ask for?
 

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In comparing my M&P .40 to a Sig 226 in .40 that I've shot several times, I love both. Prefer the ergonomics of the M&P, though the Sig feels good, too. I think the perceived recoil on the M&P is a bit snappier, but that makes sense because it's polymer. As far as .40's go, the Sig 226 is the smoothest shooting I've tried. More accurate for me as well.



With that said, I own an M&P and don't own a Sig (yet).

IMO, you can't go wrong between the two - and if you can afford it, get 'em both!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
why did ICE and other law enforcement agencies go with the Sauer. did the M&P come out too late for trials?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
i have used a p220 and when i store the gun it rusts. the only way i can store it is it has to be sitting out in the open. another thing i have heard that many people do not like the fact that some guns may have plastic has anyone ever had trouble with the "plastic" of the M&P
 

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sherpa said:
The Sig DAKs seems to be nice. Has anyone compared them with the M&P trigger?


The DAK is like a revolver trigger, just lighter. It is a long, smooth trigger pull. There are two reset points with the DAK. The first one you come to, coined the "intermediate" reset, is about halfway forward and adds 1.5-2# to the trigger pull weight if you only reset that far. The second, or "full" reset, gives you a consistent trigger pull for every shot from first to last but requires the trigger move the full arc twice per shot (once back to the front, then pulled to the rear). The original specification for the DAK was 3 kilograms (6.6#). That is for a P226. The P229 and P220 are half a pound to a pound heavier (due to leverage), and the P239 is another half a pound or pound more than that. In addition, SIG changed to a stronger mainspring over the past year (indicated by red paint on the spring) which adds another half pound or so.



So the DAK wins on smoothness, the M&P wins in terms of speed and (for some people) reach.
 

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mwadibe said:
i have used a p220 and when i store the gun it rusts. the only way i can store it is it has to be sitting out in the open. another thing i have heard that many people do not like the fact that some guns may have plastic has anyone ever had trouble with the "plastic" of the M&P


S&W uses Zytel for the "plastic" in their M&P line. It is one of the more expensive and best available "plastics" out there. S&W's choice to use Zytel is a good one, there shouldn't be any problems with it. Whirlpool uses quite a bit of it in their products, as does IBM. It is a product of Dupont, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zytel
 

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Todd, what is the reasoning behind the two reset points? I can understand the concept of "working the reset", but the heavier trigger pull at the first reset would seem contraindicated. My only guess is a concern that someone working the reset might inadvertently pop one off with the lighter trigger.
 

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jnc36rcpd said:
Todd, what is the reasoning behind the two reset points? I can understand the concept of "working the reset", but the heavier trigger pull at the first reset would seem contraindicated. My only guess is a concern that someone working the reset might inadvertently pop one off with the lighter trigger.


Well, there is an engineering answer and a marketing answer.



The marketing answer is that the intermediate reset is heavier to prevent, as you said, an AD. So if someone starts to have hand spasms the gun won't fire. Or, if someone is used to the full reset point (which is what I teach folks to use), they are maybe a little less likely to let fly with an unintended round if they short stroke the action. However, the reset is there, the marketing folks say, specifically so that if, under stress, the shooter does in fact short stroke the trigger the gun will still go off.



The engineering answer is that there are actually two separate mechanisms within the gun that can make it go bang. This was needed to provide multi-strike capability, which SIG has always maintained as a critical feature in a combat weapon (and a feature that distinguishes it from some of its biggest competition in the LE/mil arena). The intermediate reset is, in essence, a side-effect of that mechanism. Two different "things" reset, either of which can enable the gun to fire. But the mechanism which provides the multi-strike capability doesn't have as much leverage, so the trigger pull is heavier.
 

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I like my S&W MP40 very much. So far.......no problems.

But if I had to choose, without any doubt, I would choose a Sig 226/229/220 all of which have been 100% reliable out of the box and hopefully, all the bugs have been well worked out by now. I think S&W still has a ways to go perfecting the M&P, particularly in the area of mags dropping, slides locking open prematurely, and strikers failing. But I still love my MP....just not sure if I want to trust my life to it yet.
 

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As much as I love my M&Ps, if had a choice between grabbing my Sig P226 .40 and my M&P 9/40/45, it would be the Sig! I have sipped the Glock Kool-Aid and down right love my M&Ps but must admit, my single most trusted pistols are either my P226 .40 or my P229 .40.
 

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texagun said:
hopefully, all the bugs have been well worked out by now.


The problem with this logic is that every gun company is constantly making changes to the internal parts of their guns. Sometimes it's done to improve things (e.g., to fix problems with early M&P strikers). Sometimes it's done to save money. In every case I'm aware of, testing of the new parts is less vigorous than testing of the original design.



So Brand-X Model 66 pistol might be a twelve year old design, but you have no idea whether the trigger bar is now being made of a different material (to save money) or coming from a different vendor (to save money, increase US-made content percentage for government contracts, etc). I've seen both, and in both cases hundreds and hundreds of guns were released into the market before significant problems were discovered.



We all understand that a '67 Corvette is a lot different than a '07 Corvette. Well, a '67 Colt 1911 is a lot different than a '07 Colt 1911, too.



There is a reason why most huge government contracts include a clause freezing the parts, sub-vendors, design, etc. and only allow changes if subsequently tested & approved on a part by part basis. Once they test a particular locking insert, for example, they want that locking insert for the life of the contract even if the manufacturer starts using a different one in their commercial guns. (been there, seen that, too)
 

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Right now, one advantage a .40 SIG 226 or 229 has over an MP40 is that drop-in 367sig barrels are easy to find. (hint, hint, S&W
)



I have a DAK 226 and a DAK 220. As Todd mentioned, the DAK triggers straight out of the box are very smooth and very revolver-like. So, it does take some adjustment time, for example, if you are used to a single-action trigger. I almost guarantee you will shoot low-left with one at first.



I like the DAK trigger, but that being said, if I had it to do over again, I would get the SAO P220 instead.
 

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I have a M&P and a new 226. The 226 does not fit in my small hands as well as the M&P. However, the 226 has a higher overall level of quality about it. This may be subjective, I understand, but its my perception. There are also a ton more accessories on the market since it has been around for years. I prefer the constant trigger pull of my M&P, but the sig is a better shoot all day weapon. Also, the alloy frame of the Sig feels more gun like, another subjective opinion, and it (frame) does not weigh that much more than the M&P.
 
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