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Discussion Starter #1
This may sound like a wierd question so bear with;



I've been looking at the movement of the slide and was wondering ..... what part of the pistol takes the brunt of the force when the slide moves forward?? If the take down lever is lowered the slide comes right off in a forward motion .... so would this mean that with the lever up that is also what stops the slides forward motion?? Or would it be the barrel, mainly the rear where the breach is & where the barrel meet the take down lever?? Then again it could be all 3 places right??



I'm asking because I put a heavier recoil spring in and wanted to know what parts are going to take the most stress/wear the most with the heavier forward return. I had the factory spring marked blue which I read was only 10# and went up to a 24#. Wanted to get more backwards recoil vs muzzle flip & read this was the way to do it.
 

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Most 1911 gunsmiths will tell you one specific thing to NEVER do to a pistol. That's clear the gun and unlock the slide and allow it to slam forward. I NEVER do this with any gun. I've known some gun shops that have a policy written up that say if you do that to one of their guns when you are looking at it, that you just bought it or paid to have it looked at by a smith to assure nothing was hurt by your actions.



greatzippy said:
I had the factory spring marked blue which I read was only 10# and went up to a 24#. Wanted to get more backwards recoil vs muzzle flip & read this was the way to do it.


That being said. The actual weight of the stock recoil spring is 16# (according to Wolf Springs and others). Common wisdom in the competition arena, where fast shooting is mandatory and recoil management is everything, is to lighten the stock recoil spring instead. A 24# spring is going to possibly even cause issues with any lighter power ammo not being able to reliably cycle the slide. Now if you are a CorBon +P+ kind of shooter then the higher spring might be a good move but even then I wouldn't make such a radical jump as 16# to 24#. Buy a few intermediate springs and shoot bill drills (6 shots into a target as fast as you can from about 10y) to see what effect the spring weight has on the timing of your shooting. It's a timing drill developed by Matt Burkett I believe. When you play with it a little bit you will see what the effect of the spring has on your firing cycle timing and you will find that you might have a bit too much spring in your M&P. I run a 13# spring in my standard 9 with target loads so far, but I'm experimenting with 14# and 15# springs too.
 

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Morphire said:
Most 1911 gunsmiths will tell you one specific thing to NEVER do to a pistol. That's clear the gun and unlock the slide and allow it to slam forward. I NEVER do this with any gun. I've known some gun shops that have a policy written up that say if you do that to one of their guns when you are looking at it, that you just bought it or paid to have it looked at by a smith to assure nothing was hurt by your actions.
Doesn't the slide move forward with its full force after every single shot??
 

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ShooterMcGavin said:
Doesn't the slide move forward with its full force after every single shot??


bingo, yes they do. However some will say the round being picked up out of the mag and inserted in the chamber acts as a buffer for the slide.
 
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