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Discussion Starter #1
has anyone actually changed to a lighter spring and has felt less recoil??

using the same gr bullet?

i undertsand it is not true..
 

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OK. You shove a bullet weighin X out the front of the gun at speed Y. THe force transferred to you is exactly the same no matter what.



What mucking about with springs and burn rate of powder does is change the length of the recoil impulse. lets say the recoil is 5ft-lbs. You put in a lighter spring, it gets snappier/flippier. You put in a heavy spring it will mellow the recoil a bit and make it more pushy than flippy. Howver, it will put the slide back into battery with a bit more vigor, and

you might get your sights dipping too much, and it can exxagerate any flinch you have.



It gets very complicated, and how messing with impulse and springs effects feel varies with things like the mass of the gun, reciprocal mass of the gun, non-reciprocal mass of the gun, grip angle, and the action of the gun.



Add in the fact that personal opinion is what mesaures the good/bad of what you feel at the other end, and it is a nearly useless practice to discuss unless you know what you want to achieve ahead of time.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
can i achieve less flip of gun and maintain the same integrity for the gun. just wondering?

i assume taht the less gr you use the less recooil you wil have .i it I shoot a 180 gr with a different spring willl that work.

it ain't broke so don't fix?lol
 

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when changing gr wt you notice that the Muzzle Vel goes up. The shove of the 180GR turns into a hit in the 155 level.
 

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The math gets funny as everything is interrelated.



If you take the powder charge of a 180gr round and put a 155gr bullet over it, you get more velocity. It's usually not a linear relationship, so the recoil is usally less than the 180, but not much as the 155 is now moving faster.



A good recipie in general for a soft shooting round is to put a heavy bullet over the minimum charge to get the velocity you want, and to have that powder be towards the faster end of the burn rate charts. Somehwere fast enough that all/most of the powder is burned by the time the bullet exits the muzzle. The mass and action of the firearm interact with this in such a way that the last fine tuning is a holistic process. That involves playing with spring rates on most guns, and various other things that are platform dependant (e.g. on 1911s, you can play with firing pin stop profile, recoil and mainspring wieghts, shock-bufs, main spring housing shape, etc).



As a general rule with recoil springs lighter weight means that more energy stays in the slide, and you get more flip but a gentler return to battery. A heavier spring rate means more energy is absorbed byt he spring/frame, and gives more of a pushy recoil.



In a heavy gun, heavier springs make the mass of the gun work for you more in the disipation of recoil by taking more advantage of the inertia of the heavier gun.



heavier mainsprings will generally result in torque similar to flippy/snappy recoil as the energy transfer changes it's axis of motion in order to cock the hammer of the gun (non-issue on striker fired guns).



For the M&P, I'd probably jsut stick to a faster burn rate powder, and try the 14lb recoil spring when it comes out Given that it is a light gun with a striker.
 

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Mr. Gotz PM'd me this question and below is my response:



it will change they way feels but not the actual amount of recoil.



Lighter springs usually cause less muzzle rise but you can feel a more harsh impact of the slide against the frame.



Heavier springs usually have more muzzle rise, less impact on the rearward travel of the slide but more on the return to battery.



regardless of spring there will always be the same amount of energy being transferred into the gun then into your hand.



Since recoil is a perception there is no right way to determine what a spring change may do for you. But you must be careful if you get too much spring then the gun won't cycle reliably when shooting one handed.



Dan


That is the best way I am able to put it into words.



The only way I know to find the right recoil spring is figure out what load you want then play around with several springs until you find the one you thinks feels the best and cycles your gun reliably even in less than ideal shooting positions.



Dan
 
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