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Great Info! Thanx for sharing :)
 

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Can't wait to pick one up.
 

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Surgical staplers are only for the most superficial and simple wound closures. The wound should not be any deeper than the depth of the staple itself, which is usually 3'16" - 1/4" in depth.

Self application of the stapler to close your own wounds is quite limited....it will require at least one forcep in one hand and the stapler in the other....it will require the wound be visible an reachable by both hands, e.g. that rules out upper extremity wounds, most head wounds, all wounds on the backside of the body and back side of most of your lower legs.

Most novices will require an assistant to use 2 forceps to properly align the wound edges and perhaps a third person to apply the staples.

The stapler is intended to close simple lacerations that are clean with sharp wound edges......not ragged wound edges, not deep wounds.

The staples hurt to apply without local anesthetic. The staples require a special staple remover device to remove them without gouging the wound that has healed.

The staples will generally be required to remain in place for 7-14 days depending on the site of the wound closure.

Virtually all traumatic wounds, small / large will heal without sutures or staples if attended to with topical simple cleansing and patience. The final result of the scar might be improved with the use of staples, however when applied by a novice for the sake of closing a wound, your scar might not be one bit better.

The most important judgment in closing traumatic wounds is whether or not it is safe to close the wound .......was the wound depths properly cleansed, is it a high risk wound for infection e.g. farm yard soil, dirty underwater rock, animal bite, puncture wound etc.... all the above at risk for closing the wound and risking tetanus infection and what is commonly referred to as "flesh eating bacteria" to proliferate when the jubilence of closing a laceration is superceded by medical training. Most of the time when a laceration is repaired in an emergency room setting etc. the patient will not be prescribed antibiotics as all the above concerns have already been considered. Closing a wound with staples by a novice and not having even basic microbiology antibiotic coverage (which are wound specific) could be a medical disaster, leading to a severe infection or even death.
 

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Surgical staplers are only for the most superficial and simple wound closures. The wound should not be any deeper than the depth of the staple itself, which is usually 3'16" - 1/4" in depth.

Self application of the stapler to close your own wounds is quite limited....it will require at least one forcep in one hand and the stapler in the other....it will require the wound be visible an reachable by both hands, e.g. that rules out upper extremity wounds, most head wounds, all wounds on the backside of the body and back side of most of your lower legs.

Most novices will require an assistant to use 2 forceps to properly align the wound edges and perhaps a third person to apply the staples.

The stapler is intended to close simple lacerations that are clean with sharp wound edges......not ragged wound edges, not deep wounds.

The staples hurt to apply without local anesthetic. The staples require a special staple remover device to remove them without gouging the wound that has healed.

The staples will generally be required to remain in place for 7-14 days depending on the site of the wound closure.

Virtually all traumatic wounds, small / large will heal without sutures or staples if attended to with topical simple cleansing and patience. The final result of the scar might be improved with the use of staples, however when applied by a novice for the sake of closing a wound, your scar might not be one bit better.

The most important judgment in closing traumatic wounds is whether or not it is safe to close the wound .......was the wound depths properly cleansed, is it a high risk wound for infection e.g. farm yard soil, dirty underwater rock, animal bite, puncture wound etc.... all the above at risk for closing the wound and risking tetanus infection and what is commonly referred to as "flesh eating bacteria" to proliferate when the jubilence of closing a laceration is superceded by medical training. Most of the time when a laceration is repaired in an emergency room setting etc. the patient will not be prescribed antibiotics as all the above concerns have already been considered. Closing a wound with staples by a novice and not having even basic microbiology antibiotic coverage (which are wound specific) could be a medical disaster, leading to a severe infection or even death.
I don't believe anyone that has access to basic medical care would use this item for day-to-day wound care. This would be for a major disaster scenario where the only option you have is to clean the wound and close it yourself (or with the help of a friend). Wouldn't it be more beneficial to clean and close the wound than to leave it exposed in post-disaster scenario where it may be a long time before you could receive medical attention?

Amazon also has rather inexpensive staple removers as well.
 

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Wouldn't it be more beneficial to clean and close the wound than to leave it exposed in post-disaster scenario where it may be a long time before you could receive medical attention?
Yes to cleaning. No to closing the wound. Therein lies the misunderstanding for the public at large with the apparent easy stapler solution to address their misinformed understanding of wound healing in general and the pitfalls of wound closure in particular.

Nature has been safely closely open ugly wounds for man and beast without staplers since time began. Countless third world countries and most second tier countries don't have access to staples in their medical care system, due to lack of cost effectiveness.

Staplers are employed in some highly developed countries for the sole purpose of expediency, not safety, of wound closure after the benefit of using said stapler has been evaluated by trained personnel.
 

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Surgical staplers are only for the most superficial and simple wound closures. The wound should not be any deeper than the depth of the staple itself, which is usually 3'16" - 1/4" in depth.

Self application of the stapler to close your own wounds is quite limited....it will require at least one forcep in one hand and the stapler in the other....it will require the wound be visible an reachable by both hands, e.g. that rules out upper extremity wounds, most head wounds, all wounds on the backside of the body and back side of most of your lower legs.

Most novices will require an assistant to use 2 forceps to properly align the wound edges and perhaps a third person to apply the staples.

The stapler is intended to close simple lacerations that are clean with sharp wound edges......not ragged wound edges, not deep wounds.

The staples hurt to apply without local anesthetic. The staples require a special staple remover device to remove them without gouging the wound that has healed.

The staples will generally be required to remain in place for 7-14 days depending on the site of the wound closure.

Virtually all traumatic wounds, small / large will heal without sutures or staples if attended to with topical simple cleansing and patience. The final result of the scar might be improved with the use of staples, however when applied by a novice for the sake of closing a wound, your scar might not be one bit better.

The most important judgment in closing traumatic wounds is whether or not it is safe to close the wound .......was the wound depths properly cleansed, is it a high risk wound for infection e.g. farm yard soil, dirty underwater rock, animal bite, puncture wound etc.... all the above at risk for closing the wound and risking tetanus infection and what is commonly referred to as "flesh eating bacteria" to proliferate when the jubilence of closing a laceration is superceded by medical training. Most of the time when a laceration is repaired in an emergency room setting etc. the patient will not be prescribed antibiotics as all the above concerns have already been considered. Closing a wound with staples by a novice and not having even basic microbiology antibiotic coverage (which are wound specific) could be a medical disaster, leading to a severe infection or even death.

Thanks. Too much stuff to remember. It's easier just to die. :smiling:

Super Glue might be the better option.
 

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Super Glue might be the better option.
Medical super glue has a more limited role than staplers in closing wounds.....much more shallow wounds. The problem with super glue is that you have to keep the wound edges together while the glue dries ! There is no clever way to do that. In emergency rooms it is often tauted as a simple solution for simple pediatric wound closures......anyone who has every tried to get near a small child with a cut in the ER knows they are not going to be sitting still while the wound edges are apposed to allow the glue to dry.....not any better than poorly placed sutures.

Most uses of super glue in the operating room are to "seal" a incision already closed by stitches / staples....in lieu of applying a cumbersome bandage over said stitches / staples.
 

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Medical super glue has a more limited role than staplers in closing wounds.....much more shallow wounds. The problem with super glue is that you have to keep the wound edges together while the glue dries ! There is no clever way to do that. In emergency rooms it is often tauted as a simple solution for simple pediatric wound closures......anyone who has every tried to get near a small child with a cut in the ER knows they are sitting still while the wound edges are apposed to allow the glue to dry.....not any better than poorly placed sutures.

Most uses of super glue in the operating room are to "seal" a incision already closed by stitches / staples....in lieu of applying a cumbersome bandage over said stitches / staples.
THANK YOU on your sound advice before some one does something WAY beyond their skill level and medicial knowledge and things go "ugly" fast.:shock: I know Super Glue works well on paper cuts.:yes
 

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I carry suitures in my backpack and would try to get one of these. Though I am un trained and have no imideate intrest in using it I would rather have them and not need them on a backcountry hike than not have them. I would also hope that anyone would seek medical assistance as soon as possible.
 

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Here's a fairly recent news item that incorporates all the elements of this thread......

Georgia Woman Fights for Life Against Flesh-Eating Bacteria - The Daily Beast


1. A apparently benign appearing laceration to the leg from falling off a zip-line ride
2. Wound examined and closed by medical personnel with staples
3. Within 2 days the infection of the leg threatened life
4. Weeks of intensive care, limb amputations etc....
5. Victim survives but life altered forever.

The care this patient received in the two days subsequent to having her laceration closed with staples, is problematic in many ways. However, the lesson learned for the general public is that ......unless there is an underlying bone fracture that was not detected or a foreign body not removed......a closed wound should not continue to cause intractable pain !! .....it should not cause you to have "flu symptoms".......if it does, something is wrong in the healing process; get a second opinion from the treating doctor immediately......if you hear that it's normal to experience severe pain from a laceration.....get a 3rd / 4th opinion immediately at another accredited health care facility !
 

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Hmmm....staple a lot of folks and never used forceps or assistants.
If you are applying the staples you are the "assistant" attending to the one with the wound.

Please tell us how you appose the wound edges for alignment before the staples are applied.
 

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To better inform this thread viewers, here is an example one of the best staplers available.......used a similar one this morning. Note how small the surgical staple is, which is why it has very limited application for difficult wound closures.


Also, an example of the simplest of wounds that might be appropriate to close with a stapler....shown is a laceration near the ankle; here the tissue is generally shallow in depth, the wound edges are clean and sharp, the wound edges are not far apart. Even if repaired with staples, the wound (ankle) should be splinted, otherwise the rigid staples will "cheese wire" right through the edges of the wound causing the wound to separate and open again.

The last photo is an example of a forearm wound that would be inappropriate for staples alone or a wound that an untrained person should not attempt to close.
In a healthy person, this wound would heal fine in a couple weeks with simple cleansing twice a day and some manner of clean bandage if available. Yes, there would be scar, maybe ugly, but that is what scar revision procedures are for.

Hope this helps.






 

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Surgical staplers are only for the most superficial and simple wound closures. The wound should not be any deeper than the depth of the staple itself, which is usually 3'16" - 1/4" in depth.

Self application of the stapler to close your own wounds is quite limited....it will require at least one forcep in one hand and the stapler in the other....it will require the wound be visible an reachable by both hands, e.g. that rules out upper extremity wounds, most head wounds, all wounds on the backside of the body and back side of most of your lower legs.

Most novices will require an assistant to use 2 forceps to properly align the wound edges and perhaps a third person to apply the staples.

The stapler is intended to close simple lacerations that are clean with sharp wound edges......not ragged wound edges, not deep wounds.

The staples hurt to apply without local anesthetic. The staples require a special staple remover device to remove them without gouging the wound that has healed.

The staples will generally be required to remain in place for 7-14 days depending on the site of the wound closure.

Virtually all traumatic wounds, small / large will heal without sutures or staples if attended to with topical simple cleansing and patience. The final result of the scar might be improved with the use of staples, however when applied by a novice for the sake of closing a wound, your scar might not be one bit better.

The most important judgment in closing traumatic wounds is whether or not it is safe to close the wound .......was the wound depths properly cleansed, is it a high risk wound for infection e.g. farm yard soil, dirty underwater rock, animal bite, puncture wound etc.... all the above at risk for closing the wound and risking tetanus infection and what is commonly referred to as "flesh eating bacteria" to proliferate when the jubilence of closing a laceration is superceded by medical training. Most of the time when a laceration is repaired in an emergency room setting etc. the patient will not be prescribed antibiotics as all the above concerns have already been considered. Closing a wound with staples by a novice and not having even basic microbiology antibiotic coverage (which are wound specific) could be a medical disaster, leading to a severe infection or even death.
Excellent. Antibiotics should be only to treat wounds that are already dangerously infected, Otherwise, you risk making super-bugs that resist antibiotics. Ditto for sulfa(prontosil).

Only 2.8% of German soldiers died from wound infections in WWI. Antiseptics, wound debriding, tetanus antitoxin, and prompt medical treatment were the reasons.
 

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I discovered staplers some years ago when having my head stapled shut one time. Lost an argument with a fencepost-driver in 2006; one of my sons took this pic when I fell asleep on the couch the next day. These were put in by an ER doctor; not at home.



To me, they're like scalpels, sutures, and a lot of things - a person needs to know the limits of both the equipment and their own skill & knowledge. I do keep several on hand, but both I and my wife have been thru substantial first-aid training (my wife's actually a medical technologist of 27 years now). She's removed stitches from various parts of my body and has pulled staples out of my head at our dinner table. Not during dinner....

I'm also a fan of super glue; KrazyGlue specifically. I carry it in my woods first aid kit, and have used it on myself and numerous others quite a few times over the years. Again, not a cure-all, miracle or magic, but a handy tool within its limitations.
 
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