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For those of you out there that like spending time out in the wildnerness etc. check this link out.....its awesome.



WildwoodSurvival.com - Fire from a Can of Coke and a Chocolate Bar
 

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if you have access to some Willow, the bow drill is pretty easy (once you make up a bow with a little flex to it.



you can do it with others, but willow is the easiest to learn with.
 

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WOW!!!! WHO"DA THOUGHT!

This is truely amazing! I think I'll try this out. Hope it works with a beer can so I can drink a can (or ten) of beer in the name of science.
 

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Re: WOW!!!! WHO"DA THOUGHT!

TxPhantom said:
This is truely amazing! I think I'll try this out. Hope it works with a beer can so I can drink a can (or ten) of beer in the name of science.


LMAO.....good thinking.....lol
 

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synergy said:
if you have access to some Willow, the bow drill is pretty easy (once you make up a bow with a little flex to it.



you can do it with others, but willow is the easiest to learn with.


will give it a shot!!!! I am always open to new survival tips!!!!! after all we could be at war at any monute, why wait you know!! thanks for the tips!
 

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finalfusion said:
[quote name='synergy']if you have access to some Willow, the bow drill is pretty easy (once you make up a bow with a little flex to it.



you can do it with others, but willow is the easiest to learn with.


will give it a shot!!!! I am always open to new survival tips!!!!! after all we could be at war at any monute, why wait you know!! thanks for the tips![/quote]



I taught kids how to do this all summer...we just handed them the kits, and let them go for it. It's shaping the fireboard, and getting the bow right that's difficult.



You want a flat board, about 1.5" thick (willow) then a spindle with a flat tip about .75" in diameter at the tip...a socket that's a harder material and slick (fatty pine works amazingly well) then a bow with a little bit a flex to it (ash, hickory, ossage orange, etc)



Cut a starter hole in the board, deep enough so you can start spinning in the spindle. Drill slow and consistant...to burn in the hole. Once you get a little smoke, square off the tip, and cut a v notch in the side of the board, into the hole (hole should be about 1.5" from the edge of the board). Cut out about 1/6th of the hole with the V notch.



Fit it all together, and set the notch on top of something to collect the powder (piece of bark works just fine)



Spin slow, steady, with a light to firm amount of down pressure (you have to feel the blend of speed vs. pressure....will be different depending on the wood used) After a few secs (provided the wood is good and dry) it'll start to smoke. Keep rolling the drill, same speed and pressure...you're looking for chocolate colored powder to form at the notch. Once you get a ball of that a little smaller than a dime...ROLL THAT BOW FOR ALL YOU'RE WORTH!!! Hard and fast, for a good 10 secs. You should be CHURNING out smoke....then stop. Take the spindle out, and see if you get a little whisp of smoke from the powder in the v-notch. If so, you have a Coal..that's what you're looking for. If not, keep drillin'.



Once you have your Coal, KNOCK the fireboard (freeing it from the board, and keeping it in one clump on your bark) then whisper to it a little bit, just a touch of oxygen...you should see it glow a little.....transfer that coal into a bundle of tinder...and blow on it a little bit....it should go up in flames in a couple seconds.



Cedar bark works real well for tinder bundles.



Keep in mind, the rest of your fire HAS TO be able to a "1 match fire". You HAVE to have more than suffecient tinder and kindling...cause your fire is VERY dellicate, and you have to coach it from an ember in the powder you drilled...up to material the size of logs. A lot of practice with 1 match fires is nescessary before you can make a fire with a bow-drill. You need to have the feel for blowing on a fire, and building up combustion from twigs the size of matchsticks, up to finger thickness stuff...in a minute or two, tops. You need to know how to structure a fire, and how to feed it oxygen to heat it up fast.



It takes a lot of practice to get effecient at this....once you know how it all goes together...and how things need be shapped an all....you really just have to get a hang for the "feel" of it (the pressure vs speed thing for drilling).



Once my kit was built, and I had my tinder and kindling laid out...I could start drilling and have a flame inside of a minute. That being said, I have about a 10% sucess rate, when I go out and try and make a kit from scratch with gathered material on the spot. I take a cord/ rope, and a knife, and make the rest. It takes a LOT of practice, and the right wood. When I go out in the woods...it's with not less than 2 lighters, a metal match, a candle, and some flint. I keep a lot of other stuff in my "essentials kit" but that's the fire stuff.



Fire gives you a lot of things....heat, water that's safe to drink, tool making, cooking, smoke signals, companionship, protection from animals, light, etc. Mastering it is a valuable skill for those who venture outdoors.



Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
synergy said:
[quote name='finalfusion'][quote name='synergy']if you have access to some Willow, the bow drill is pretty easy (once you make up a bow with a little flex to it.



you can do it with others, but willow is the easiest to learn with.


will give it a shot!!!! I am always open to new survival tips!!!!! after all we could be at war at any monute, why wait you know!! thanks for the tips![/quote]



I taught kids how to do this all summer...we just handed them the kits, and let them go for it. It's shaping the fireboard, and getting the bow right that's difficult.



You want a flat board, about 1.5" thick (willow) then a spindle with a flat tip about .75" in diameter at the tip...a socket that's a harder material and slick (fatty pine works amazingly well) then a bow with a little bit a flex to it (ash, hickory, ossage orange, etc)



Cut a starter hole in the board, deep enough so you can start spinning in the spindle. Drill slow and consistant...to burn in the hole. Once you get a little smoke, square off the tip, and cut a v notch in the side of the board, into the hole (hole should be about 1.5" from the edge of the board). Cut out about 1/6th of the hole with the V notch.



Fit it all together, and set the notch on top of something to collect the powder (piece of bark works just fine)



Spin slow, steady, with a light to firm amount of down pressure (you have to feel the blend of speed vs. pressure....will be different depending on the wood used) After a few secs (provided the wood is good and dry) it'll start to smoke. Keep rolling the drill, same speed and pressure...you're looking for chocolate colored powder to form at the notch. Once you get a ball of that a little smaller than a dime...ROLL THAT BOW FOR ALL YOU'RE WORTH!!! Hard and fast, for a good 10 secs. You should be CHURNING out smoke....then stop. Take the spindle out, and see if you get a little whisp of smoke from the powder in the v-notch. If so, you have a Coal..that's what you're looking for. If not, keep drillin'.



Once you have your Coal, KNOCK the fireboard (freeing it from the board, and keeping it in one clump on your bark) then whisper to it a little bit, just a touch of oxygen...you should see it glow a little.....transfer that coal into a bundle of tinder...and blow on it a little bit....it should go up in flames in a couple seconds.



Cedar bark works real well for tinder bundles.



Keep in mind, the rest of your fire HAS TO be able to a "1 match fire". You HAVE to have more than suffecient tinder and kindling...cause your fire is VERY dellicate, and you have to coach it from an ember in the powder you drilled...up to material the size of logs. A lot of practice with 1 match fires is nescessary before you can make a fire with a bow-drill. You need to have the feel for blowing on a fire, and building up combustion from twigs the size of matchsticks, up to finger thickness stuff...in a minute or two, tops. You need to know how to structure a fire, and how to feed it oxygen to heat it up fast.



It takes a lot of practice to get effecient at this....once you know how it all goes together...and how things need be shapped an all....you really just have to get a hang for the "feel" of it (the pressure vs speed thing for drilling).



Once my kit was built, and I had my tinder and kindling laid out...I could start drilling and have a flame inside of a minute. That being said, I have about a 10% sucess rate, when I go out and try and make a kit from scratch with gathered material on the spot. I take a cord/ rope, and a knife, and make the rest. It takes a LOT of practice, and the right wood. When I go out in the woods...it's with not less than 2 lighters, a metal match, a candle, and some flint. I keep a lot of other stuff in my "essentials kit" but that's the fire stuff.



Fire gives you a lot of things....heat, water that's safe to drink, tool making, cooking, smoke signals, companionship, protection from animals, light, etc. Mastering it is a valuable skill for those who venture outdoors.



Cheers.[/quote]



Very well done synergy. especially for the kido's!! Thats awesome, I cant wait to take my little girl out and show her these things. Ok now I must read over this several more times....haha Think I will copy paste it.......Thanks for the awesome post my freind.
 
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