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What is the difference in using a Dillon taper crimp die as opposed to a Lee precision *factory crimp* die? For less than $20 shipped to my door is it something worth considering?



I reloaded about 200 rounds using the Dillon taper die and ran them through my MP40 at a local USPSA match Sunday without any feeding problems at all. I adjusted the Dillon die per the instructions and have a decent crimp when compared by eye to a factory round. The crimp is not an exaggerated bevel but rather a nice edge to the bullet.



Is there a specific crimp measurement that I should be looking for in thousandths?



I'm using a 180 gr Berry flat point bullet (40 cal), OAL of 1.125.



Any help would be greatly appreciated.



Regards,

Throwin Lead
 

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You didn't mention what caliber you are loading so I'll give a little information for both 9mm and .40SW. I have both the factory Dillon crimp dies and the Lee Factory Crimp dies for both 9 and 40SW and have found this. For anything other than a WAY tight toleranced barrel, you are fine with the Dillon dies you already have. I have found better success getting my .40SW loads to chamber check since adding the LFCD to my toolhead. I'm shooting a custom built Millennium Custom USPSA Limited gun with insane tolerances for my .40SW shooting though so keep that in mind. My 9mm Glock and M&P feed all day long with the Dillon dies with no issues at all.



I load my .40SW with 180gr Zero JHP, 1.200" OAL, 4.7gr Titegroup.

I load my 9mm with 115 Zero JHP, 1.125" OAL, 4.3gr Titegroup



Best way to tell if you have the crimp properly set is to measure the width of the base of your bullet. Then take sample measurements of the thickness of the brass you are shooting at the mouth of the case. Take an average of that measurement and double it and add it to the bullet width. This gets you a crimp that is the bullet + the brass. This works fine for both .40SW and 9mm and is recommended by Brian Enos in his Competition Reloading DVD.
 

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It is my understanding that the difference of the two is the Lee FCD resizes the case the whole way down while it applies the taper crimp where as the dillon is just a crimp die.



Please tell me if I am wrong on this.
 

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I believe you are right Dan. I use a RCBS taper crimp die for my 9mm; and I have never had problems with it.
 

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I've been using the Dillon taper crimp dies for years in 9mm and 45 acp, and since last June in 40 S&W, they work just fine!
 

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I load some pretty heavy .357 mag and .44mag cartridges for my revolvers which require a really serious roll crimp. For this application the Lee factory crimp die is a godsend. Using the regular roll crimp dies you can get a bulge below the bullet and the cartridge won't chamber. The Lee FCD irons this bulge out when you pull the cartridge out through the carbide sizing ring of the Lee FCD.



I have not had this problem loading lots of 9mm & .45acp cartridges and find no need to use anything other than the standard taper crimp dies.



FWIW
 

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A regular taper crimp is recommended for auto pistol cartridges.
 
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