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Discussion Starter #1
okay i have a full size 40, and i want to pick up a compact. now i can get a 9c and have cheaper ammo and larger round count. But then i would have to buy different clips for each gun and ammo. I'm not sure i would want a 40c, i can handle a 40 and a 45 and 357 mag just fine. but being a small guy, im not sure how a 40c would feel with recoil.



if i get a 9c i would then be confused on rather to keep the 40 full size or switch to a 9mm!!



sigh the options dont end there, no doubt i will be picking up a 45 mp.



anybody have some insight or thought on the real difference in calibers and recoil. I had a full size nine, a carbine nine, and a kel tec 380 (snappy little gun). I also have a pistol grip mossberg that i shoot with no problems. Right now i feel the .40 is the best of both worlds, fairly large caliber, stoping power, plus good round count.
 

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As someone who has owned multiple models/calibers of Glocks at the same time, I can tell you this can get tricky. It's hard to make a sure recommendation without ever firing the M&P .40 compact.



At one time I had 3 different guns that I carried depending on the circumstances. The problem was I had 3 different calibers. 9mm, .40, 357sig.



I don't feel undergunned at all carrying 9mm. With modern self-defense ammo, the difference b/t the calibers is negligible. For this reason I am slowly going to 9mm across the board. The problem I have right now is hunting laws. I am an avid hunter; and I always carry a handgun with me. The law in Oklahoma in regards to hunting with a handgun states you have to use a minimum of .40 or 357Sig.



I want a compact also. But I think I'm going to wait and see how the M&P .40 compact behaves. I have a lot of experience with both the Glock 26 and 27. I love the Glock 26. The Glock 27 has enough recoil, that I prefer the Glock 26 for training and carry. I can handle the recoil, but it is stiff. I think the recoil of the M&P .40 compact won't be as bad as the Glock 27, but I don't know for sure.



If you can wait until the compact .40 comes out, wait and see how well it shoots. If you don't have a problem carrying 9mm, then trade your fullsize .40 for a 9mm. It is much easier to have the same caliber in multiple guns. But sometimes it just doesn't work out that way. If you plan on carrying both guns at the same time, then the caliber needs to be the same.
 

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I just got the full size M&P .40

If I get the Compact one day I'm sure it'll be the .40 because of all the things you already mentioned PLUS



A while back - one of our officers had someone break into their home while they were there with family. The guy had an ax and came through the front door. Our officer warned him to stop - he kept on coming. Our officer fired one 9mm into him - kept coming - fired another - kept coming - took 5 before he stopped - staggered outside and dropped.

Next day that officer got a .40



Now, No way to know if he'd had a .40 to begin with if it'd be a different story or not but he feels like it would have been.
 

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caliber

If the shot is placed in the right spot with a 9mm or .40, it will stop the assailant. You can shoot a 9mm more accurately most of the time for shooters with normal skills and you can shoot a lot more for the costs of shooting a .40. I used to worry about all this, now I carry a 9mm in 3 different guns, one of which is a compact. I feel comfortable that I can place the shot where needed.
 

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Not to second guess but that officer sounds like he needs some training. Anyone who is defending himself with a pistol and fires one shot, stops, fires another shot, stops, and fires another on up to 5 shots does not understand what poor manstoppers pistol calibers are. 9, 40, 45 or 50 AE, it doesn't matter. You always shoot until the threat disappears from your sights.



If he expects one shot stops he's gonna find out that the 40 doesn't do too well either.





Gringop
 

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Discussion Starter #6
double tap is what i have been always taught. but i think im confused on the options and accessories for each gun. that and the wonder on how the 40c when released will recoil vs the 9c. sigh
 

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gringop said:
Not to second guess but that officer sounds like he needs some training. Anyone who is defending himself with a pistol and fires one shot, stops, fires another shot, stops, and fires another on up to 5 shots does not understand what poor manstoppers pistol calibers are. 9, 40, 45 or 50 AE, it doesn't matter. You always shoot until the threat disappears from your sights.



If he expects one shot stops he's gonna find out that the 40 doesn't do too well either.





Gringop


The "Supect" was his Uncle & he was wired up on something - Dunno how much that might have affected the situation.
 

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You have to understand that your gun is just a tool. Handguns are a relatively weak tool at that, even in .40 which is what I carry (hell, even in .44 mag. You can only put so much powder in a case that's maybe 1 1/2" long). In my opinion, protecting your home with a handgun is a bit like roofing your house with a 6 oz finishing hammer. It's better than a rock, but not the right tool for the job.



Your home defense gun doesn't have to be light, small, comfortable, or concealable. So why would you choose a handgun?



I recommend a pump action shotgun for home defense. They're cheap, powerful, simple, and shoot a ton of different kinds of rounds. Plus, with a giles sling they are nearly impossible to take away. And they put more distance, which equals time, between you and the bad guy.



They even make something like a GunVault for long guns which mounts to a wall and covers the reciever of the gun with a quick access lock plate.



Smooth bore guns are CA compliant. You can do whatever you want to them. There's even a kit called the sidewinder which converts a pump shotgun into a gun which accepts 10 round drum mags.



Even the best handgun in the world can't do every job equally well.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
i have a Mossberg (maverick) 88 with buck shot at home. my question was more along the lines of when i get the 9c, or the 40c if it comes out it time.



should i stick with one caliber so i can have interchangeable mags, because i plan to buy a ton. And we all know they ain't cheap with shipping.



Plus I can order 1k to 2k rounds, and to do that for two calibers like i used to can be very expensive.





For now i plan to wait and rent the 40c and see how i like the recoil. And If its not comfortable i will just get the 9c and trade my .40 in for a full size 9 and get the 45 later.
 

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Oh, wait for the 40c, multiple calibers/magazines is a PITA. Someone will come out with a mag sleeve and you'll be good to go. Plus it makes reloading simpler if you decide to get into that (I highly recommend it).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
that is one thing i have been looking into for some time, but living in a apt makes it hard. I have been eying the hand press though. I just seems like when i add up the cost to reload it doesn't make any financial sense?
 

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Let me make this very clear up front: no one ever saved money by reloading. What really happens is, you spend about the same amount, but you get almost twice the amount of ammo if you load yourself. You spend the same but shoot way more. If you like looking at your gun more than shooting it, don't get into reloading.



You can easily load .40 for less than $0.10/rd if you keep your brass. If you take your time and shop around, you can load .40 for less than $0.07/rd. That's a savings of $70-100 per 1000 rds. I usually shoot 1000-1500 rds per month. Saving $70-100 per month, it didn't take me long to save the $500 I spent on a full auto indexing progressive setup. (if you shoot alot, I wouldn't get anything less)



I live in a very small house. Go to a welder and have him take an old car rim, weld a 3 ft length of pipe to it, and a 4"x4" piece of 1/2" plate to the top of the pipe. Drill & tap your holes, and you have a nice work surface with a small footprint. Keep the rest of your stuff in a STURDY duffle bag, or a few ammo cans.



I have a Hornaday L-N-L press $350 + stand described above $50 + dies, shell plate holder, scale, flip tray, etc. $100. Eventually I'll get the automatic case feeder too $300.



Be honest with yourself. Reloading only makes sense if you really like shooting a lot. If you can't, or don't shoot a lot, don't get into reloading.
 

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I use both 9MM and 40 S&W pistols. The Wally World WWB 165 Gr. FMJ 40 S&W ammo is almost the same price as 9MM (about $.20 per round with tax) for both cal. when you buy the 40 S&W in the 100 rd. economy box and it is good for range work. I use Winchester Ranger SXT for carry and both types of ammo shoot about the same POI in both guns. So even when not reloading ammo price is not much if a factor. I to found that at first I was more accurate with the 9MM but after several hundred rounds of practice with the 40, I now shoot about the same with either.



But Yes, if I am defending my home, I'll grab my Mossberg 500 Persuader 12 Ga. with 8 rounds of 00 Buck not a handgun. In addition to more fire power, the shotgun is way more intimidating to an intruder than a handgun especially when they hear that "chunk-chunk" of a round being chambered.
 

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I will reach for the AR-15 if I ever find an intruder in my house. If I don't have time to get to it, I keep my MP9 handy though.



The most important thing is to practice lots with it to make sure you can put the bullet where you want to
 

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The only down side to the AR-15 is that for me, my next door neighbor may not be to happy when those .223 bullets come sailing through his walls. I've got a 30-06 in the house but if I were to use it, I may have neighbors in several houses upset or dead.
 

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bobbthompson said:
... Reloading only makes sense if you really like shooting a lot. If you can't, or don't shoot a lot, don't get into reloading.


Reloading also makes sense if you want some extremely accurate, or light recoiling, cartridges.

Reloading gives you complete control over the finished cartridges.
 

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cb900f said:
...In addition to more fire power, the shotgun is way more intimidating to an intruder than a handgun especially when they hear that "chunk-chunk" of a round being chambered.


There are advantages to a handgun in close combat situations such as a house, especially if you have a wife and/or kids.



The purpose of a weapon is not to intimidate someone. If your handgun does not intimidate a home intruder, then you get to show him how it works...



The only thing a "chunk-chunk" will do is give away your position. Always try to keep the element of surprise.
 

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cb900f said:
The only down side to the AR-15 is that for me, my next door neighbor may not be to happy when those .223 bullets come sailing through his walls. I've got a 30-06 in the house but if I were to use it, I may have neighbors in several houses upset or dead.


Despite what most people believe, most .223/5.56 bullets do not penetrate hard barriers well. Usually a layer or 2 of sheet rock will cause the bullet to fragment. And if you have a brick/stone home, you have nothing to worry about.
 

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And if you have a brick/stone home, you have nothing to worry about.


Houses around here we're talking 1/2 in. of drywall, 3 in. fiberglass insulation, 1/2 inch of foam sheeting and plastic siding for an outside wall. I don't think a couple of these walls will frag a .223 bullet. At least I wouldn't want to bet my neighbors life on it.
 
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