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When I was shooting my M&P in 9MM last weekend I notice I started getting better hits when I placed my first joint of my trigger finger on the trigger. I had been shooting the M&P like I do my Glocks with the pad of my finger. Where do you place your trigger finger and if any of you know where does Ernest Langdon and Julie Goloski place their trigger finger?
 

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Welcome! I personally use the pad of my finger. I have always understood this to be the most effective trigger placement.
 

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I have no idea what Goloski does. I know Langon uses the pad. The generally accepted way is to us the pad. Using the joint may cause you to twist the gun slightly inward as you curl your finger toward your thumb/palm while firing. Using the pad allows you to press straight back.
 

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I always use the the part close to the first joint. It has to do with hand size and finger length. If I had shorter fingers or the trigger broke further out, I could use the pad with good results. As it is, I get the best results close to the first joint. I am using the large palmswell.



Thanks, Mark
 

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The thing that confuses the issue is whether a pistol is a single action or double action, the striker fired MP is similar in trigger pull length to a double action revolver.



I shot double action revolvers for years competitively in PPC in the Master Class, we were taught to curl the trigger finger around the trigger, and most double action shooters do it the same.



On a single action pistol like the 1911, the recommendation is usually to place the pad of the trigger finger on the trigger.



In the photo's at the link, you will notice Jerry Miculek shooting a double action revolver with his finger wrapped around the trigger, in the next photo you see Julie Goloski shooting a MP with the first pad of the finger, this shows the different techniques used by different shooters.



So what is the "correct" answer? Whatever works for you!
 

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G56 said:
In the photo's at the link, you will notice Jerry Miculek shooting a double action revolver with his finger wrapped around the trigger, in the next photo you see Julie Goloski shooting a MP with the first pad of the finger, this shows the different techniques used by different shooters.


Actually it show different techniques with the same shooter as well. if you notice Jery shooting the D/A revo is using the joint but when shooting the M&P he is using the pad.



But you are right practice what works best for you with your gun.
 

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I have longish fingers. I can get a good solid sight picture using the first joint, but no speed. To get both I have to use the pad of my finger and get it just right without too much wiggle room. More picky than a 1911, but less picky than my old H&K USP. A hair pickier than my baby eagle.



It one of those ergonomics things with more opinion and less physics, so there won't be an answer that is right for everyone.
 

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I personally use the pad and I know Todd Jarrett and most all top shooters use the pad when shooting autos. They most all use the first joint when shooting revolvers, but pad when shooting autos.
 

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K said:
I personally use the pad and I know Todd Jarrett and most all top shooters use the pad when shooting autos. They most all use the first joint when shooting revolvers, but pad when shooting autos.
I was watching one of the shooting shows recently, and they were talking to one of the "top" experts, although I had never heard of this particular guy, and he was training people to never remove their finger from the trigger, only let the trigger return enough to reset, and never let it go further than that, in his opinion it was just terrible to let the trigger finger come off the trigger to reset. In some of the other shows they have shown tips by other top shooters, the ones you have heard of like Rob Leatham, clearly saying they recommend taking the finger completely off the trigger to reset!

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_..._28/ai_n6204146



Different opinions from different people, all talking about trigger control!




Also known as different strokes for different folks!
 

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Slapping the trigger as they call it, and yep, some shoot faster slapping, and some with the reset style. I slap, and it works fine.
 

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I've used both methods but prefer to ride the reset and use my pad with semis. I have only found trigger slapping to be accurate for me with light triggers.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for the replies and the link to the pictures. I guess I'll go back to using the pad of my finger and spend some momey to get the trigger lighten some.
 

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leadfoot said:
Ayoob recommends the distal joint and not the pad.


Ayoob recommends a lot of things, many of them contradictory, and lots of them without any real world evidence to back them up. Which makes me basically ignore the man.



As for slapping the trigger, some do, some don't. Some of it is mechanics. I can get away with slapping the trigger on my 1911 with a short straight pull trigger. On a CZ based gun, it slowd me down, but I more or less get away with it accuracy-wise. With glocks it slows things down and disturbs accuracy. With the M&P hinged trigger, It slows things down, hurts accuracy, and I can actually cause the trigger safety to "work" on occasion, which is real bad for peroformance.



In general, guns with trigger safeties need you to ride the reset for max performance.
 

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I've always been taught to use the pad and as a consequence I teach using the pad. Pad use is important if you use the reset. There are more sensory neurons in the pad so you will have a better feel. With the short action of reset shooting use of of the joint can cause you to shoot low and to the left/right depending on what handed you are.



But as others have said, in the end you should use what works for you.



Bomber
 

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G56 said:
[quote name='K']I personally use the pad and I know Todd Jarrett and most all top shooters use the pad when shooting autos. They most all use the first joint when shooting revolvers, but pad when shooting autos.
I was watching one of the shooting shows recently, and they were talking to one of the "top" experts, although I had never heard of this particular guy, and he was training people to never remove their finger from the trigger, only let the trigger return enough to reset, and never let it go further than that, in his opinion it was just terrible to let the trigger finger come off the trigger to reset. In some of the other shows they have shown tips by other top shooters, the ones you have heard of like Rob Leatham, clearly saying they recommend taking the finger completely off the trigger to reset!

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_..._28/ai_n6204146



Different opinions from different people, all talking about trigger control!




Also known as different strokes for different folks!
[/quote]



That's true, different things for different people, but slapping vs riding the trigger is a little different than whether you place the pad or joint on the trigger. Even Jerry Miculek (the greatest revolver shooter that ever lived) uses his pad on semi autos and his first joint on revolvers.



Slapping is easier and easier to get away with when the trigger is lighter. If your trigger is above 5lbs and you slap typically, you'll throw rounds frequently. Plus, Rob and others can get away with slapping 1.5lb triggers.
 

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personally, i dont think there is a correct answer.



i dont give a crap if you stand on your head and pull the trigger with your toes while farting the theme song to the "Cosby Show"...



if you're hitting the bullseye, you're hitting the bullseye!!!!!
 

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I agree that it is more shooter preference than anything else, but just to note. I found that I had been firing off the joint with the M&P. Not sure why this occurred, maybe just due to my grip on that particular gun, I have always fired my Glocks off the pad. I concentrated on adjusting my grip style and shooting off the pad yesterday and saw my patterns improve quite a bit. Just my .02 if you have been stuck in one position try something new and see if it helps or hurts. As far as slapping, I want to feel someone else’s trigger, because if you guys can pull that off I think I got a bad gun......
 

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I agree that it is more shooter preference than anything else, but just to note. I found that I had been firing off the joint with the M&P. Not sure why this occurred, maybe just due to my grip on that particular gun, I have always fired my Glocks off the pad. I concentrated on adjusting my grip style and shooting off the pad yesterday and saw my patterns improve quite a bit. Just my .02 if you have been stuck in one position try something new and see if it helps or hurts. As far as slapping, I want to feel someone else’s trigger, because if you guys can pull that off I think I got a bad gun......
 
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