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When dry firing, do you cycle the slide all the way or just far enough back to cock the gun ?



Also, how do you use SnapCaps when dry firing? (I know, you don't need 'em for the M&P, but if you were using a different semi-auto that recommended using them.)



Seems like it would certainly slow things down to reload them all the time, even if one happens to be independently wealthy and can afford to buy 18 of the little buggers. :wink:
 

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I don't generally use snap-caps for dry-fire practice.



I only pull the slide back enough to charge the striker.



Using snap-caps on pistols like the M&P and Glocks, etc can be annoying. Pistols that feature a traditional hammer are much less hassle.
 

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You should pull the action to the rear and snap it back as you normally would. You want to do this because in dry firing exercises, you want to train with the snap caps just as you would if they were live rounds. The slide is designed to slam into action and you should treat it like such. Also, I load them into the magazine as I would live rounds. I only have one package of five, so yes it does get a little repetative at times. But this provides a couple of good things for me. First, it helps to break in the two new, free clips that I received from Smith. Secondly, I try do this as fast and as smoothly as I can to practice reloading a mag as if I were in a pressure situation...you never know if you may need to do this one day. These examples are why I use the snap caps even though many will tell you that you don't need them with newer semi-auto guns.
 

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I use snap caps, even if I only pull the slide back far enough to reset the striker. You can argue all day with people as to whether dry fire causes even minimal damage or none at all. I see no reason why you shouldn't use them if you have them. They are certainly worth the money for practice drills.
 

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FieroCDSP said:
I use snap caps, even if I only pull the slide back far enough to reset the striker. You can argue all day with people as to whether dry fire causes even minimal damage or none at all. I see no reason why you shouldn't use them if you have them. They are certainly worth the money for practice drills.


Is this practice bad for the extractor? I know hand loaded a round into the chamber and then shutting the slide is bad for the extractor. I wonder if this is doing the same thing?
 

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FieroCDSP said:
I use snap caps, even if I only pull the slide back far enough to reset the striker. You can argue all day with people as to whether dry fire causes even minimal damage or none at all. I see no reason why you shouldn't use them if you have them. They are certainly worth the money for practice drills.


+1 I bought a pack of Action Trainers and I use one in both my Glock and M&P every time I dry-fire. I tend to put about 100 dry-fire "rounds" through my Glock and/or M&P almost every night.



As an FYI though, I prefer the Action Trainers to the other snap-cap type dummy rounds that I have with the orange bullet and primer (forgot the brand). The Action Trainers have a hard plastic primer that sits flush with the case, as a real bullet does. The orange snap-caps have a primer that sits in to the case a bit and the Glock striker barely contacts it (if at all) when firing. It's useless for the purpose for which I bought it, which was to keep the striker from slamming into the breech-face.
 

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BonoVox said:
Is this practice bad for the extractor? I know hand loaded a round into the chamber and then shutting the slide is bad for the extractor. I wonder if this is doing the same thing?


No, it's not. Once the bullet is seated properly in the extractor when it's stripped from the magazine, it stays there until it's ejected.



You can manually put a bullet in the chamber of a gun if you wanted to (for whatever reason). You just need to ease the slide forward until you see the rim of the case engage the extractor. If the bullet is all the way into the barrel you can shake the gun lightly until the bullet backs out far enough for the extractor to be able to catch it when you ride the slide forward.



None of this serves much of a purpose aside from learning how the gun works and farting around with Action Trainers.
 

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BonoVox said:
[quote name='FieroCDSP']I use snap caps, even if I only pull the slide back far enough to reset the striker. You can argue all day with people as to whether dry fire causes even minimal damage or none at all. I see no reason why you shouldn't use them if you have them. They are certainly worth the money for practice drills.


Is this practice bad for the extractor? I know hand loaded a round into the chamber and then shutting the slide is bad for the extractor. I wonder if this is doing the same thing?[/quote]





Inserting a round into the chamber and letting the slide slam forward is bad for the extractor because it has to pop over the case rim, which is not how it is meant ot operate. The case rim is supposed to slide up from below into the gap between the claw and breech face.



However, short stroking the slide liek a chamber check to reset the striker won't hamr anything because the case rim starts out where it needs to be. That is as long as you chambered the snap cap normally.
 
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