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I wanted to start shooting USPSA.



I had been thinking of it for a while.



I got lasik surgery done to see 15/20.



I Traded my Glock 17 for a M&P 9mm (Sense sold that for a .40)



I had a great trigger job done on the M&P .40 and fiber optic front sight installed.



I had shot IMHSA for a long time so accuracy was OK.



I practiced 3 to 5 times a week at the range and did 50 to 100 draws a night.



My practice was done at long range ...another mistake.



I also sit and do mag changes while watching TV.



I went to my first match with the 9mm and shot production.



Stage one and two I shot somewhat slow to be sure of all Alfas.



At 3 and 4 I had spoke to other competitors and learned that charlies were OK so I stepped it up a bit.



On 1 and 2 I was 12th and 15th out of 20. On 3 and 4 I was 6th and 8th.



I had made a mistake in dressing and wore jeans that were to tight and heavy boots.



This next match coming up I will be in shorts, sneakers and move my mag holders more to the front.



I will stay with the steady rate of fire I figure the speed will come in time.



I had zero misses and zero penalties.



Is this a good plan? :?:
 

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Excellant- you are on the right track! With your focus you will be winning in no time. :wink:
 

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"You can never shoot fast enough to make up for misses!" Take your time and learn cadence. Hit all A's and then push yourself to go faster. When you are dropping shots you need to slow down a little.
 

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I'd respectfully disagree. Once fundamental marksmanship is up to the task, the most effective and efficient way to improve speed is to go faster. Just as you won't automatically get more accurate shooting the same cadence day after day, you won't automatically get faster shooting the same tight group day after day.



If you can hit a 3x5 card on demand 10 times in a row at a distance of 7yd, your marksmanship fundamentals are refined enough to start spending some of your training time specifically on speed. Learn to understand how speed and accuracy interact and how to shift gears to eek out a little more speed or accuracy as the target dictates.



The most important aspect to improving your shooting speed is accepting misses. If you're using an IPSC target for your practice, understand that when you are working on speed-improvement drills you will have C- and even D-zone hits. If you're getting 100% A's, you're not pushing yourself hard enough. You've simply hit a comfort zone. To shoot faster you need to shoot faster ... it's pretty simple when you think about it.




However, I will repeat the caveat: if you can hit a 3x5 card on demand 10 times in a row at a distance of 7yd. If you can't do that, then my advice is to work on your visual reference and trigger manipulation skills. You have to be able to hit before you can start trying to hit fast.
 

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coltman1985 said:
"You can never shoot fast enough to make up for misses!" Take your time and learn cadence. Hit all A's and then push yourself to go faster. When you are dropping shots you need to slow down a little.


:? I would have to disagree with what you are saying here. You don't need to slow down, you need to see faster and learn to call an acceptable shot. And you can miss fast enough to win. I have done it in IDPA matches due to how misses are assessed a "time penalty". All you have to do is shoot 2.5 seconds faster than the next guy and that miss is washed out. USPSA matches are a different story. Cadence is good if all the targets are the same size and distance, but that is rarely the case. JMHO from the last 6 years shooting in competition. :roll:
 
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